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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

Moreover, the inscriptions on the burgh-walls would have been the very first that would fall prey to the conquerors' ravage - they would have been annihilated in the most thorough ways.

Exactly.

And adding to what was said in the last three posts (Apol, NO-ID-EA and Puzzler):

Most archaeological finds are labelled "Germanic", "Keltic", "(Anglo-) Saxon" (since '45 the label 'Germanic' is less popular), while some might as well have been labelled "Frisian".

History, including archaeology are for a part politically relevant as they help create or sustain a national identity, even more so in these times of secularization.

I can't copy the photo's, but in another thread there are finds in the the Römisch-Germanische Museum in Köln of a big 6-spoked wheel (remains) and this was said:

Als toelichting in de tentoonstellingsgids stond hierover nog dat de Franken in de 4e en 5e eeuw 'heidense' symbolen, zoals dit wiel, systematisch vernietigden. Dit zal zeker ook zijn gebeurd met eventueel overgeleverde teksten.

=> In the catalogue of the exhibition it was explained that the Franks in the 4th and 5th century systematically destroyed all 'pagan'symbols, like this wheel. This will surely also have happened with texts that might have been saved until then.

In this museum was also a bowl (dated: first ten years of CE) with the name Horus scratched on it with a 'Fryan' H (although it may also have been meant as an L: Lorus?, because that is sometimes written as a mirrored Greek Lambda), but the photo is not very clear. I hope someone can make a better picture of it some day.

The Greek alphabet has no H, and the Latin one is the same as our capital H.

Typical is that in the explanation this name was not mentioned, while that of another bowl (in normal letters) in the same showcase was.

My point is, that once archaeologists go look for JOL script, they may find more of it.

Many letters that diverge from the classic ancient alphabets as we know them can be found here: http://otharus.tumblr.com/

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Thank you.

Now I ask you: will you agree when a post a link to the Stormfront site, where HLH/Otharus is posting?

I don't want you to report me as some kind of nazi again, I have been banned from that stupid site already for not being "White" enough.

.

This thread should be free from neonazi links including the neonazi blog Fryskednis. In fact everybody can see, that this thread is again poisened by neonazism by Otharus, HLH, Gestur. I told you, that it was a big mistake of you to register with Stormfront.

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I'd like you to show me an example of that.

Not from the OLB, of course.

Here, try to read this (without Googling):

Eiris sazun idisi, sazun hera duoder; suma hapt heptidun, suma heri lezidun, suma clubodun umbi cuoniouuidi: insprinc haptbandun, inuar uigandun

.

I'll pass right now thanks.

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Exactly.

And adding to what was said in the last three posts (Apol, NO-ID-EA and Puzzler):

Most archaeological finds are labelled "Germanic", "Keltic", "(Anglo-) Saxon" (since '45 the label 'Germanic' is less popular), while some might as well have been labelled "Frisian".

History, including archaeology are for a part politically relevant as they help create or sustain a national identity, even more so in these times of secularization.

I can't copy the photo's, but in another thread there are finds in the the Römisch-Germanische Museum in Köln of a big 6-spoked wheel (remains) and this was said:

=> In the catalogue of the exhibition it was explained that the Franks in the 4th and 5th century systematically destroyed all 'pagan'symbols, like this wheel. This will surely also have happened with texts that might have been saved until then.

In this museum was also a bowl (dated: first ten years of CE) with the name Horus scratched on it with a 'Fryan' H (although it may also have been meant as an L: Lorus?, because that is sometimes written as a mirrored Greek Lambda), but the photo is not very clear. I hope someone can make a better picture of it some day.

The Greek alphabet has no H, and the Latin one is the same as our capital H.

Typical is that in the explanation this name was not mentioned, while that of another bowl (in normal letters) in the same showcase was.

My point is, that once archaeologists go look for JOL script, they may find more of it.

Many letters that diverge from the classic ancient alphabets as we know them can be found here: http://otharus.tumblr.com/

I agree the absence of the writing is a problem. However, I do think that some good reasons have been given on why we can't find any relics of it.

Just to recall the Nordwestblock theory....because even though we may not find any writing, evidences point to a people in the exact area of Frisia whose language may have been more important than we know.

The Nordwestblock theory

Some scholars (De Laet, Gysseling, Hachmann, Kossack & Kuhn) have speculated that a separate ethnic identity, neither Germanic nor Celtic, survived in the Netherlands until the Roman period. They see the Netherlands as having been part of an Iron Age "Nordwestblock" stretching from the Somme to the Weser.[25][26] Their view is that this culture, which had its own language, was being absorbed by the Celts to the south and the Germanic peoples from the east as late as the immediate pre-Roman perod.

Disappearance of the Frisii

The ancient Frisii were forced to resettle within Roman territory as serfs (laeti) about 300, and disappeared as a distinct group. Three factors contributed to the disappearance of the Frisii from the northern Netherlands. First, according to the Panegyrici Latini (Manuscript VIII), the ancient Frisii were forced to resettle within Roman territory as laeti (i.e., Roman-era serfs) in ca. 296.[31] This is the last reference to the ancient Frisii in the historical record.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Netherlands

What makes the OLB seem all the more real to me is that these people were a people who had everything wiped out - by nature, Romans, Franks and every other man and his dog, losing most of their identity and language in the process. Who knows what has been built over, kept secret or lost to the sea and time, before archaeology was even 'invented'.

Edited by The Puzzler

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It's interesting that the Frisii and Frisiaevones disappeared to be replaced by their old kin the Angles and Saxons - Anglo-Saxons and Jutes - it's these people who settled in ancient Frisia and became "Frisians" although not descended from the ancient Frisii.

Continued: What happened to them, however, is suggested in the archaeological record. The discovery of a type of earthenware unique to 4th century Frisia, called terp Tritzum, shows that an unknown number of them were resettled in Flanders and Kent,[32] likely as laeti under Roman coercion. Second, the environment in the low-lying coastal regions of northwestern Europe began to deteriorate ca. 250 and gradually worsened over the next 200 years. Tectonic subsidence, a rising water table and storm surges combined to flood some areas with marine transgressions. The situation was aggravated by a shift to a cooler, wetter climate in the region. If there had been any Frisii left in Frisia, they would have fallen victim to the whims of nature.[33][34][35][36] Third, after the collapse of the Roman Empire, there was a decline in population as Roman activity stopped and Roman institutions withdrew. As a result of these three factors, the Frisii and Frisiaevones disappeared from the area. The coastal lands remained largely unpopulated for the next two centuries.

As climatic conditions improved, there was another mass migration of Germanic peoples into the area from the east. This is known as the "Migration Period" (Volksverhuizingen). The northern Netherlands received an influx of new migrants and settlers, mostly Saxons, but also Angles and Jutes. Many of these migrants did not stay in the northern Netherlands but moved on to England and are known today as the Anglo-Saxons. The newcomers that stayed in the northern Netherlands would eventually be referred to as "Frisians", although they were not descended from the ancient Frisii. These new Frisians settled in the northern Netherlands and would become the ancestors of the modern Frisians.[37][38] (Because the early Frisians and Anglo-Saxons were formed from largely identical tribal confederacies, their respective languages were very similar. Old Frisian is the most closely related language to Old English[39] and the modern Frisian dialects are in turn the closest related languages to contemporary English.) By the end of the 6th century, the Frisian territory in the northern Netherlands had expanded west to the North Sea coast and, by the 7th century, south to Dorestad. During this period most of the northern Netherlands was known as Frisia. This extended Frisian territory is sometimes referred to as Frisia Magna (or Greater Frisia).

Dorestad and main traderoutes

In the 7th century and 8th century, the Frankish chronologies mention this area as the kingdom of the Frisians. This kingdom comprised the coastal provinces of the Netherlands and the German North Sea coast. During this time, the Frisian language was spoken along the entire southern North Sea coast. The 7th century Frisian Kingdom (650–734) under King Aldegisel and King Redbad, had its centre of power in Utrecht.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Netherlands

English may only show relics of Fryan/early Frisian that was used in Old Saxon. So some Fryan words are probably lost and the English words are Saxon versions of Fryan words.

Edited by The Puzzler

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Dorestad and main traderoutes

In the 7th century and 8th century, the Frankish chronologies mention this area as the kingdom of the Frisians. This kingdom comprised the coastal provinces of the Netherlands and the German North Sea coast. During this time, the Frisian language was spoken along the entire southern North Sea coast. The 7th century Frisian Kingdom (650–734) under King Aldegisel and King Redbad, had its centre of power in Utrecht.

http://en.wikipedia....the_Netherlands

English may only show relics of Fryan/early Frisian that was used in Old Saxon. So some Fryan words are probably lost and the English words are Saxon versions of Fryan words.

Dorestad (city) never existed. s. http://www.rodinbook.nl/indexdorestad.html .

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It's interesting that the Frisii and Frisiaevones disappeared to be replaced by their old kin the Angles and Saxons - Anglo-Saxons and Jutes - it's these people who settled in ancient Frisia and became "Frisians" although not descended from the ancient Frisii.

Continued: What happened to them, however, is suggested in the archaeological record. The discovery of a type of earthenware unique to 4th century Frisia, called terp Tritzum, shows that an unknown number of them were resettled in Flanders and Kent,[32] likely as laeti under Roman coercion. Second, the environment in the low-lying coastal regions of northwestern Europe began to deteriorate ca. 250 and gradually worsened over the next 200 years. Tectonic subsidence, a rising water table and storm surges combined to flood some areas with marine transgressions. The situation was aggravated by a shift to a cooler, wetter climate in the region. If there had been any Frisii left in Frisia, they would have fallen victim to the whims of nature.[33][34][35][36] Third, after the collapse of the Roman Empire, there was a decline in population as Roman activity stopped and Roman institutions withdrew. As a result of these three factors, the Frisii and Frisiaevones disappeared from the area. The coastal lands remained largely unpopulated for the next two centuries.

As climatic conditions improved, there was another mass migration of Germanic peoples into the area from the east. This is known as the "Migration Period" (Volksverhuizingen). The northern Netherlands received an influx of new migrants and settlers, mostly Saxons, but also Angles and Jutes. Many of these migrants did not stay in the northern Netherlands but moved on to England and are known today as the Anglo-Saxons. The newcomers that stayed in the northern Netherlands would eventually be referred to as "Frisians", although they were not descended from the ancient Frisii. These new Frisians settled in the northern Netherlands and would become the ancestors of the modern Frisians.[37][38] (Because the early Frisians and Anglo-Saxons were formed from largely identical tribal confederacies, their respective languages were very similar. Old Frisian is the most closely related language to Old English[39] and the modern Frisian dialects are in turn the closest related languages to contemporary English.) By the end of the 6th century, the Frisian territory in the northern Netherlands had expanded west to the North Sea coast and, by the 7th century, south to Dorestad. During this period most of the northern Netherlands was known as Frisia. This extended Frisian territory is sometimes referred to as Frisia Magna (or Greater Frisia).

English may only show relics of Fryan/early Frisian that was used in Old Saxon. So some Fryan words are probably lost and the English words are Saxon versions of Fryan words.

Could you please quote the source ?

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Could you please quote the source ?

The source is there, History of the Netherlands - Wikipedia. You will find all sources of the relevant quotes there too.

Here it is again anyway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Netherlands

Scroll to Disappearance of the Frisii.

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Dorestad (city) never existed. s. http://www.rodinbook.nl/indexdorestad.html .

Looks alot of writing I unfortunately cannot read. But I can read this:

In the Early Middle Ages, Dorestad was the largest settlement (emporia) of northwestern Europe. It was a large, flourishing trading place, three kilometers long, situated where the rivers Rhine and Lek diverge southeast of Utrecht in the Netherlands near the modern town of Wijk bij Duurstede.[1][2] In Roman times a Roman fortress was built there that was still in use during the existence of Dorestad. Between 600 and around 719 Dorestad was often fought over between the Frisians and the Franks.

Dorestad was a North Sea trading centre between the 7th century and the middle of the 9th century,[2] primarily handling goods from the Middle Rhineland.[2][3] Wine was among the major products traded at Dorestad, likely from vineyards south of Mainz.[3]

The place was widely known because it had a mint. Around 640, the master of the mint in Dorestad was Madelinus. Later, sceattas and Carolingian coins were minted there.

Because of its success as a trading place, according to medieval Christian written sources[4] Dorestad drew the attention of Vikings, who frequently raided the place (834, 835, 836, 837, 844, 857 and 863). Vikings were involved in the first raid in 834. The raid of 857 was led by Rorik of Dorestad.[citation needed] Dorestad became the capital of the Viking Kingdom of Dorestad, which lasted from 850 to 885.

Dorestad declined around 850 and shrunk to a small agricultural site. However, in 896 king Zwentibold of Lotharingia refers to the rights and privileges of Dorestad in a document. The town's remains have been partially washed away by the river.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorestad

So this place is what? Imaginary?

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Looks alot of writing I unfortunately cannot read. But I can read this:

In the Early Middle Ages, Dorestad was the largest settlement (emporia) of northwestern Europe. It was a large, flourishing trading place, three kilometers long, situated where the rivers Rhine and Lek diverge southeast of Utrecht in the Netherlands near the modern town of Wijk bij Duurstede.[1][2] In Roman times a Roman fortress was built there that was still in use during the existence of Dorestad. Between 600 and around 719 Dorestad was often fought over between the Frisians and the Franks.

Dorestad was a North Sea trading centre between the 7th century and the middle of the 9th century,[2] primarily handling goods from the Middle Rhineland.[2][3] Wine was among the major products traded at Dorestad, likely from vineyards south of Mainz.[3]

The place was widely known because it had a mint. Around 640, the master of the mint in Dorestad was Madelinus. Later, sceattas and Carolingian coins were minted there.

Because of its success as a trading place, according to medieval Christian written sources[4] Dorestad drew the attention of Vikings, who frequently raided the place (834, 835, 836, 837, 844, 857 and 863). Vikings were involved in the first raid in 834. The raid of 857 was led by Rorik of Dorestad.[citation needed] Dorestad became the capital of the Viking Kingdom of Dorestad, which lasted from 850 to 885.

Dorestad declined around 850 and shrunk to a small agricultural site. However, in 896 king Zwentibold of Lotharingia refers to the rights and privileges of Dorestad in a document. The town's remains have been partially washed away by the river.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorestad

So this place is what? Imaginary?

Not imaginary, but a misunderstanding. The only source is a monk of Ravenna (ca. 700), who tells that Dorestates (indicated as patria Frisonum) is at the mouth of the Rhine river. The place called Dorestad is 80 km inland. You will not find any old map which shows Dorestad. This is strange, because Dorestad has been regarded as the most important trade place of the early mediaevals. The real name of the so called Dorestad is Vic (lat. vicus, Wijk). They say that Dorestad suddenly disappeared, but the fact is that it never appeared.

Kaart van Blaeu

Kaart van Jansonius

Kaart van Ortelius

Kaart van Tirion

Edited by Knul

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Dorestad (city) never existed.

... and Moses parted the Red Sea :nw: .

Dorestad in the 9th century was the most strategic Frisian trading centre:

frisia4.jpg

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The source is there, History of the Netherlands - Wikipedia. You will find all sources of the relevant quotes there too.

Here it is again anyway: http://en.wikipedia....the_Netherlands

Scroll to Disappearance of the Frisii.

Thanks. I never read this article before.

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Blaeu is a 17th century reconstruction of the Roman times (ca. year zero), it has "Batovodorum", which appears to have been (or was thought to be) the old name.

Jansonius does show its newer name: "Wyc Duyrstede" (south-east of Utregt).

Ortelius is a 16th century phantasy map (reconstruction), it shows a settlement without a name in the area of Dorestad.

Tirion is also a reconstruction and it shows "Batovodorum Vicus - nu Wyk"; which was the new name ('Wyk Durestad').

A modern reconstruction (2012) made with the newest available knowledge (source: Friese Graafschappen tussen Zwin en Wezer ~ een overzicht van de grafelijkheid in middeleeuws Frisia (ca. 700-1200), by Dirk Jan Henstra):

frisia1.jpg

Edited by gestur

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In fact everybody can see, that this thread is again poisened by neonazism ...

I must have missed that, but I do hope you have reported those evil posts.

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Amor-land was not under 'Dorestad' but the area of Amer-s-foort. The Rhine did not end at Noordwijk but at Katwijk. So this map is useless.

frisia1.jpg

Edited by Knul

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this map is useless

It is from a book (2012) by Dr._Henstra from Enkhuizen.

He wrote his doctor-thesis in 2000 (Groningen) and has more authority than librarian Knul.

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I am the first to admit that scholars are not by definition always more right than amateurs, but if an amateur (or alternative historian) makes eccentric statements like "Dorestad never existed", "Amor-land was the area of Amer-s-foort" and "that map is useless", he needs to give good arguments.

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Not imaginary, but a misunderstanding. The only source is a monk of Ravenna (ca. 700), who tells that Dorestates (indicated as patria Frisonum) is at the mouth of the Rhine river. The place called Dorestad is 80 km inland. You will not find any old map which shows Dorestad. This is strange, because Dorestad has been regarded as the most important trade place of the early mediaevals. The real name of the so called Dorestad is Vic (lat. vicus, Wijk). They say that Dorestad suddenly disappeared, but the fact is that it never appeared.

Kaart van Blaeu

Kaart van Jansonius

Kaart van Ortelius

Kaart van Tirion

All those maps depict the situation during Roman times, and yes: Dorestad didn't exist during those times.

And at some point in time (during the early middle ages), the North Sea had intruded much further inland and the distance between North Sea and Dorestad would not have been 80 km at all.

Btw: Noordwijk is only 4 miles north of Katwijk. The map Gestur posted is not 'useless'.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Amor-land was not under 'Dorestad' but the area of Amer-s-foort. The Rhine did not end at Noordwijk but at Katwijk. So this map is useless.

frisia1.jpg

ewa_map.gif

http://www.keesn.nl/ewaadamorem/en3_map.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamaland

http://paulbuddehistory.com/europe/holland/

http://www.graafschap-middeleeuwen.nl/hamaland/opkomst-hamaland.html

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Exactly.

And adding to what was said in the last three posts (Apol, NO-ID-EA and Puzzler):

Most archaeological finds are labelled "Germanic", "Keltic", "(Anglo-) Saxon" (since '45 the label 'Germanic' is less popular), while some might as well have been labelled "Frisian".

History, including archaeology are for a part politically relevant as they help create or sustain a national identity, even more so in these times of secularization.

I can't copy the photo's, but in another thread there are finds in the the Römisch-Germanische Museum in Köln of a big 6-spoked wheel (remains) and this was said:

=> In the catalogue of the exhibition it was explained that the Franks in the 4th and 5th century systematically destroyed all 'pagan'symbols, like this wheel. This will surely also have happened with texts that might have been saved until then.

In this museum was also a bowl (dated: first ten years of CE) with the name Horus scratched on it with a 'Fryan' H (although it may also have been meant as an L: Lorus?, because that is sometimes written as a mirrored Greek Lambda), but the photo is not very clear. I hope someone can make a better picture of it some day.

The Greek alphabet has no H, and the Latin one is the same as our capital H.

Typical is that in the explanation this name was not mentioned, while that of another bowl (in normal letters) in the same showcase was.

My point is, that once archaeologists go look for JOL script, they may find more of it.

Many letters that diverge from the classic ancient alphabets as we know them can be found here: http://otharus.tumblr.com/

Like I said in this post :

http://www.unexplain...00#entry4056496

The 'thorn with stroke' ThornBar.gif is the letter to look for. It resembles the OLB -TH- most.

But it's from the early middle ages; you'll never find it as a rune or in any other older script.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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We don't know where the inscriptions were placed - if they were written on the very burgh-walls or on the walls of the houses inside the burghs. The houses may have been made of materials other than stone. In the burgh of Ljudgârda they were made of bricks. If the writings were on the burgh-walls, or on stone in general, we do not know whether they were cut into the stone or painted onto it. Moreover, the inscriptions on the burgh-walls would have been the very first that would fall prey to the conquerors' ravage - they would have been annihilated in the most thorough ways. Another problem is that today the remnants of several of the ancient burghs seem to lay under cities.

There you see, the six spoked wheel of the Bronze Age priest may be one artifact with correlation to the OLB. The point is that what has survived the ravages of time, and what has not, is quite random.

The 'Tex' was inscribed on the walls of the burghs, which were made of brick. And no one paints on brick, they engrave in brick. Or else they had to repaint the whole text after every rain shower., which would be kind of dumb.

There are no remnants of very ancient burghs (OLB age that is) lying under the cities, those are the remnants of medieval ringwall burghs that were created as a defense against attacks from the Vikings.

The 6-spoked wheel of the Bronze Age priest may have been a nice find, but 8-spoked wheels were used as much as - or even more than - 6 spoked wheels.

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I could label your theory that the OLB was concocted a 'conspiracy theory'.

It is a term often used to discredit 'alternative' explanations of an accepted reality.

It is a fallacy.

Let's not go there.

A conspiracy theory purports to explain an important social, political, or economic event as being caused or covered up by a covert group or organization.

http://en.wikipedia....nspiracy_theory

That is more or less what Otharus repeatedly suggested: that the 'truth' is being hidden or ridiculized

And all that because this 'truth' would turn accepted history upside down.

Well, you may have read about the finds in Anatolia (for instance Göbekli Tepe); they were not hidden from the public, though they created some sort of revolution of the known pre-history.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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As i keep being told !.... just because someone is given a name at some time in history does not mean you are going to find traces of them under that name , the name may have been given to them by their enemies , as a derogatory name , as the area they came from , or from hearsay , and may be nothing like what they called themselves ,it may have been given them by the archaeologist who first uncovered traces of them in order to record his find .

a name like Hattians or Hittites would have been un-aspirated in biblical times TTNS or TTTS and could well be a name which was wrongly aspirated like Titans , maybe Tatar or even Attica (often the h being a silent letter)..........all those Ts in the same approximate area , could make you think of a God they may have worshipped in the Gobekli Tepe vicinity .or maybe just their TAT's

The name the Hittites gave themselves was Neša or people of Neša.

But not this name, nor Hittites show up in the OLB. Of course not every known ancient people have to show up in the OLB, but these guys were very present all over the Middle East and may have been closely related to the people of Troy.

And 'Hittite' was not a derogatory name, it was the name an invading people adopted from a people, the Hatti, who already lived there.

As I said, there are those who think that the Germanic (?) Chatti were these Hittites, but aside of the name, nothing points to them coming from Anatolia.

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There has been quite some debate about the location to which the Ewa ad Amorem applies. Originally, Pertz (1835, cited by Gaupp, 1855) had the idea that it had been codified at Xanten. However, Gaupp (1855) disagreed: he suggested, the law came from Hamaland, the region of the Chamave tribe. In modern geographical terms this is the eastern part of the Dutch province of Gelderland (including the area around the river IJssel and the eastern part of De Betuwe). Therefore, he suggested the name Lex Francorum Chamavorum. This name has been adopted by many scholars.

Fruin (in a study from 1924, cited by Niermeyer, 1953 and Halbertsma, 2000) looked to the west of The Netherlands, to the present Alblasserwaard. The names Groot Ammers and Ammerstol would refer to the river Amor (or Ammor) that used to flow here. In that case, Amor-land would be a rather small territory.

In 1953, Niermeyer made a thorough analysis of all available date. In his opinion, Amor-land was the whole central Dutch river area: De Betuwe, Maas and Waal and, to the west, Teisterbant. Possibly, further north, the present province of Utrecht could also be considered part of the Amor-area.

This latter vision has not been challenged since, although Algra (2000, p. 92, without source) still mentions Hamaland. I assume, with Blok (1968) and Halbertsma (2000), that Niermeyer is nearest the truth, with the central Dutch river area. Luit van der Tuuk (2005 and pers. comm.) argues that Dorestad was at the border between Frisia and Amorland. This would imply that Amorland was south of the river Rhine and that it did not stretch into the present province of Utrecht, as suggested by Niermeyer.

Anyway, the name Lex Francorum Chamavorum is dubious. Therefore, I have used the name Ewa ad Amorem throughout this article.

http://www.keesn.nl/ewaadamorem/en1_intro.htm

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The 'Tex' was inscribed on the walls of the burghs, which were made of brick. And no one paints on brick, they engrave in brick. Or else they had to repaint the whole text after every rain shower., which would be kind of dumb.

There are no remnants of very ancient burghs (OLB age that is) lying under the cities, those are the remnants of medieval ringwall burghs that were created as a defense against attacks from the Vikings.

The 6-spoked wheel of the Bronze Age priest may have been a nice find, but 8-spoked wheels were used as much as - or even more than - 6 spoked wheels.

I don't think brick is a good material neither for painting nor for cutting texts into. It might be done, but I don't think prominent texts like the ones mentioned in the OLB were written on brickstone.

If texts were painted and not under a projecting roof - for example under a walkway, they would have been exposed to weather, yes.

Anyway, I find it most probable that the texts were written somewhere inside the burghs, for example on the inner burgh-wall. The staffs of the burghs would then be able to read them without being forced to walk out and around the fortification.

The ringwall-burghs in The Netherlands are dated to the Viking Age, that's right. But, as said before, of various reasons there are different opinions about the subject.

'Abramelin', do you have some more information about the spoked priest in Schleswig-Holstein? I haven't heard about him before.

Edited by Apol

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