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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Only just spotted this post of yours , must have missed it before .

haven't we discussed this before , when different people from different time zones write parts of the OLB , the spelling of words , or their word usage

changes , making it seem more likely that a different person has indeed written that section , but it does not really help , it could mean different people

wrote their own sections according to their experiences , or it could mean the forgers were exceedingly devious ?? .... didn't Puzzler say recently O with a hat

translated to a , so just a different hand/time zone from those using land, would be interesting to know if those using lande and land were

also supposed to be written by different people/times from each other . ??

Well, that part of the OLB could indeed have been written by someone from a different area, but I found it kind of typical you won't see that spelling of "land" anywhere else in the OLB, while all the rest of the words used in that part are the same as in other parts of the OLB.

If it was a different dialect, more words would have been spelled differently.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I am reading on old Indian Saga at the moment ..Katha Sagit Sagara.....but its quite mythological in it's content .........but you know i am looking for OLB frisians

in India , there are a few mentions of Swans being taken as wives of kings , but also of Crows being overheard talking , i note you love your crows/ravens in

your avatars Abe , what is the significance....... if any ??.......... between crows and Scans....just wondering if this old book is hinting at fris/vikings ??

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The significance of the crow in my avatar? None, I just like them. Some would say it's my 'totem', but nah.

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1200 BCE again:

Abstract

Identified in April of 1995, and still without geologic definitive prove of its origin, it was applied to the Panela crater (PE)a multidisciplinary study to investigate its cosmic origin. From geometric data of the crater it was possible to determine the size of the meteoroid, direction and angle of fall of the meteor that formed it. The ray (300 km) of vision of its troposphere explosion and the projection of 1000 km of the bolides’ trajectory from the impact place were analyzed in the Northeast region of Brazil. Archaeological sites with presence of meteoritic rock art theme were mapped in this region. The relation of the observer’s position, the parallax and his view of the phenomenon in the sky were investigated on these prehistoric registers, from different sites. The analyses of the rock arts of these prehistoric sites are coherent for a cosmic phenomenon, a Tunguska like (1908) event for the Panela crater formation, the Tupana event, around the year 1200 B.C.

http://www.scribd.co...stronomy-Expert

The Panela Crater(field) is located in Pernambuco, Brazil, at the north-eastern shouldertip of South America.

And again (posted by "The_L" today (Paleontology forum) :

Rapid cooling triggered Bronze-Age collapse and Greek Dark Age

Of course the politically correct verbiage is “climate change.”

Between the 13th and 11th centuries BCE, most Greek Bronze Age Palatial centers were destroyed and/or abandoned throughout the Near East and Aegean, says this paper by Brandon L. Drake

A sharp increase in Northern Hemisphere temperatures preceded the wide-spread systems collapse, while a sharp decrease in temperatures occurred during their abandonment. (Neither of which, I am sure – the increase or the decrease – were caused by humans.)

Mediterranean Sea surface temperatures cooled rapidly during the Late Bronze Age, limiting freshwater flux into the atmosphere and thus reducing precipitation over land, says Drake, of the Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico.

This cooling and ensuing aridity could have affected areas that were dependent upon high levels of agricultural productivity. The resulting crop declines would have made higher-density populations unsustainable.

Indeed, studies of data from the Mediterranean indicate that the Early Iron Age was more arid than the preceding Bronze Age. The prolonged arid conditions – a centuries-long megadrought, if you will – lasted until the Roman Warm Period.

Those four centuries – known as the ‘Greek Dark Ages’ – were typified by low population levels, rural settlements, population migration, and limited long-distance trade.

The Late Bronze Age collapse is associated with the loss of writing systems such as Linear B, and the extinction of Hatti as both a written and spoken language. Writing and literacy do not return to the Aegean until the end of the ‘Greek Dark Ages’ in 8th century BCE with the spread of the Phoenecian alphabet.

The collapse of Palatial Civilization occurred in different places at different times. Many of these destructions have been attributed to human-causes. (We love to blame humans for climate-driven circumstances, don’t we?) Large population migrations took place, most famously with the incursions of the ‘Sea Peoples’ into the Nile Delta and the Levant.

In Egypt, several inscriptions detailed wars with ‘Sea People’ beginning in the reign of Ramses II (1279-1213 BCE). While population movements of the ‘Sea People’ were better documented in Egypt and the Levant, they have been tied to destabilization of the Aegean region as well.

More here:

http://iceagenow.info/2013/05/rapid-cooling-triggered-bronze-age-collapse-greek-dark-age/

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The messsage here is: there are many clues that some (climatological) disaster had taken place around 1200 BCE,something UNknown in the 19th century, and that's why we don't find one single word about it in the OLB.

I have posted earlier that people in Europe went on the move around 1200 BCE, that countries were depopulated, wars ,unrest, general mayhem. And also around the Med (the Sea Peoples for instance).

The only thing from that period that shows up in the OLB is the mentioning of Ulysses sailing to Frisia.

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Posted (edited)

The messsage here is: there are many clues that some (climatological) disaster had taken place around 1200 BCE,something UNknown in the 19th century, and that's why we don't find one single word about it in the OLB.

I have posted earlier that people in Europe went on the move around 1200 BCE, that countries were depopulated, wars ,unrest, general mayhem. And also around the Med (the Sea Peoples for instance).

The only thing from that period that shows up in the OLB is the mentioning of Ulysses sailing to Frisia.

Yes. The whole book could be wrong datewise but then Ulysses, in Trojan War time...so unless the Trojan War is also a different time...

It mentions this, which sounds to me a possible conciliation of the events in the Meditteranean. Cecrops time.

The sea-king of the Tyrians brought them altogether through the strait which at that time ran into the Red Sea (now re-established as the Suez Canal). At last they landed at the Punjab, called in our language the Five Rivers, because five rivers flow together to the sea. Here they settled, and called it Geertmania. The King of Tyre afterwards, seeing that all his best sailors were gone, sent all his ships with his wild soldiers to catch them, dead or alive. When they arrived at the strait, both the sea and the earth trembled. The land was upheaved so that all the water ran out of the strait, and the muddy shores were raised up like a rampart. This happened on account of the virtues of the Geertmen, as every one can plainly understand.

The changes of 1200BC might not have had an effect on the Fryans overall.

Edited by The Puzzler

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Posted (edited)

Yes. The whole book could be wrong datewise but then Ulysses, in Trojan War time...so unless the Trojan War is also a different time...

It mentions this, which sounds to me a possible conciliation of the events in the Meditteranean. Cecrops time.

The sea-king of the Tyrians brought them altogether through the strait which at that time ran into the Red Sea (now re-established as the Suez Canal). At last they landed at the Punjab, called in our language the Five Rivers, because five rivers flow together to the sea. Here they settled, and called it Geertmania. The King of Tyre afterwards, seeing that all his best sailors were gone, sent all his ships with his wild soldiers to catch them, dead or alive. When they arrived at the strait, both the sea and the earth trembled. The land was upheaved so that all the water ran out of the strait, and the muddy shores were raised up like a rampart. This happened on account of the virtues of the Geertmen, as every one can plainly understand.

The changes of 1200BC might not have had an effect on the Fryans overall.

What you described happened 4 centuries earlier (the Suez Canal story).

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

What you described happened 4 centuries earlier (the Suez Canal story).

OK, yes, 10 times 12 + 24 makes it around 1600BC back then.

Thera eruption, I think Alewyn said.

We don't know of any changes in climate in the Med. at 1200BC really, (drought at c. 800-650BC) some Sea People appeared, the Hittites broke down with the Mycenaeans and the Dark Ages of the Med. began, but I see no real need for any changes such as earthquakes or anything to have occurred and be mentioned as part of this kind of book.

Any opinion of Credo for Crete, considering it's the first word spoken by the Apostles. Unusual connection imo, with the first word spoken co-incidence. creta isn't in the Frisian dictionary nor an English word. creda would be creta if the sailors said it, which they did name it, Minno's crew named Crete.

Edited by The Puzzler

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OK, yes, 10 times 12 + 24 makes it around 1600BC back then.

Thera eruption, I think Alewyn said.

We don't know of any changes in climate in the Med. at 1200BC really, (drought at c. 800-650BC) some Sea People appeared, the Hittites broke down with the Mycenaeans and the Dark Ages of the Med. began, but I see no real need for any changes such as earthquakes or anything to have occurred and be mentioned as part of this kind of book.

Any opinion of Credo for Crete, considering it's the first word spoken by the Apostles. Unusual connection imo, with the first word spoken co-incidence. creta isn't in the Frisian dictionary nor an English word. creda would be creta if the sailors said it, which they did name it, Minno's crew named Crete.

We know a whole lot more about what happened around 1200 BCE. Just read my former posts about it (see the links I posted). Something major was going on. I am not even talking about earthquakes, but whatever happened, people went on the move, wars broke out, countries were depopulated, and so on.

Events a lot minor compared to this were socalled recorded in the OLB, and around 1200 BCE the Fryans stll were much part of Europe.

==

"creda would be creta if the sailors said it, which they did name it, Minno's crew named Crete."

The sailors named it Kreta after the screams (singular: KRETE , plural: KRETA) the inhabitants uttered upon their arrival. That's the explanation the OLB gives us.

The word may not be in the Old Frisian dictionary, but it sure is an Old Germanic word, only maybe not used that much by the Old Frisians ( = 10th century CE).

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Posted (edited)

CREDO is the first word spoken by the Apostles, but the KRETA were not 'spoken':

OLB:

Tha-k althus wêi faren was mith mina ljvd fon Athenia, kêmon wi to tha lesta an en êland thrvch min ljvd Krêta hêten vm-a wilda krêta tham et folk anhyv by vsa kvmste.

Dutch:

Toen ik aldus weg (ge)varen was met mijn lieden van Athenia, kwamen we te(n langen) leste aan bij een eiland door mijn lieden Kreta (ge)heten om de wilde kreten dat het volk aanhief bij onze komst.

Sandbach:

When I came away from Athenia with my followers, we arrived at an island named by my crew Kreta, because of the cries that the inhabitants raised on our arrival.

Mine:

when I had thus sailed away with my people from Athenia, we finally arrived at an island called Kreta by my people because of the wild cries that the inhabitants raised on our arrival.

+++

EDIT:

The word may even come from Vulgar Latin:

cry (v.)

early 13c., "beg, implore," from Old French crier, from Vulgar Latin *critare, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek" (source of Italian gridare, Old Spanish cridar, Spanish and Portuguese gritar), of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of quirritare "to squeal like a pig," from *quis, echoic of squealing, despite ancient folk etymology that traces it to "call for the help of the Quirites," the Roman constabulary. The meaning was extended 13c. to weep, which it largely replaced by 16c. Related: Cried; crying.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

'To cry' in (Middle and Modern) Dutch is "krijten" and "krijsen"

What's interesting is that it only shows up in Middle Dutch (and later) and Middle High German (and later), not in Old German(ic) as I said before. And of course in the earlier Vulgar Latin.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

CREDO is the first word spoken by the Apostles, but the KRETA were not 'spoken':

OLB:

Tha-k althus wêi faren was mith mina ljvd fon Athenia, kêmon wi to tha lesta an en êland thrvch min ljvd Krêta hêten vm-a wilda krêta tham et folk anhyv by vsa kvmste.

Dutch:

Toen ik aldus weg (ge)varen was met mijn lieden van Athenia, kwamen we te(n langen) leste aan bij een eiland door mijn lieden Kreta (ge)heten om de wilde kreten dat het volk aanhief bij onze komst.

Sandbach:

When I came away from Athenia with my followers, we arrived at an island named by my crew Kreta, because of the cries that the inhabitants raised on our arrival.

Mine:

when I had thus sailed away with my people from Athenia, we finally arrived at an island called Kreta by my people because of the wild cries that the inhabitants raised on our arrival.

+++

EDIT:

The word may even come from Vulgar Latin:

cry (v.)

early 13c., "beg, implore," from Old French crier, from Vulgar Latin *critare, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek" (source of Italian gridare, Old Spanish cridar, Spanish and Portuguese gritar), of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of quirritare "to squeal like a pig," from *quis, echoic of squealing, despite ancient folk etymology that traces it to "call for the help of the Quirites," the Roman constabulary. The meaning was extended 13c. to weep, which it largely replaced by 16c. Related: Cried; crying.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

'To cry' in (Middle and Modern) Dutch is "krijten" and "krijsen"

What's interesting is that it only shows up in Middle Dutch (and later) and Middle High German (and later), not in Old German(ic) as I said before. And of course in the earlier Vulgar Latin.

.

We may have overlooked the bloody obvious:

Oudfries grēta ‘groeten; aanklagen’. / Old Frisian grēta 'to greet; to accuse'

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...wdb=ONW&id=ID80

greet (v.)

Old English gretan "to come in contact with" (in sense of "attack, accost" as well as "salute, welcome," and "touch, take hold of, handle"), from West Germanic *grotjan (cf. Old Saxon grotian, Old Frisian greta, Dutch groeten, Old High German gruozen, German grüßen "to salute, greet"), perhaps originally "to resound" (via notion of "cause to speak"), causative of Proto-Germanic *grætanan, root of Old English grætan (Anglian gretan) "weep, bewail," from PIE *gher- "to call out." Greet still can mean "cry, weep" in Scottish & northern England dialect, though this might be from a different root. Grætan is probably also the source of the second element in regret.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

grēt 4, afries., M.: nhd. Gruß, Klage; ne. greeting (N.), complaint; Vw.: s. -kam-pa,

-man-n, -man-n-skrÆ-v-ere, -wor-d, -wer-d-ere; Q.: W; E.: s. germ. *greutan (1)?,

st. V., weinen; L.: Hh 36a, Hh 159, Rh 783b

grē-t-a 24, afries., sw. V. (1): nhd. grüßen, klagen, anklagen; ne. greet, complain,

accuse; Vw.: s. bi-; Hw.: vgl. an. grãta, ae. grêtan, as. grætian, ahd. gruozen; Q.: S,

W, E, AA 15; E.: germ. *grætjan, sw. V., weinen machen, reden machen,

anschreien, grüßen; idg. *ghrēd-, V., weinen, Pokorny 439; s. idg. *gher- (1), V.,

rasseln, lärmen, gurgeln, murren, Pokorny 439; W.: nfries. groetjen, V., grüßen; L.:

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

Too late to edit:

wilda krêta may mean nothing but "fierce greetings", lol.

Imagine people going nuts when they see you arrive with your friends from a distance, HEY !! HELLO?? HEEEY!! WHO ARE YOU?? HEEEY !! OVERHERE !!

But the next line gives a different impression of what these people may have been shouting:

S: "When they really saw that we did not come to make war, they were quiet".

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

We may have overlooked the bloody obvious:

Oudfries grēta ‘groeten; aanklagen’. / Old Frisian grēta 'to greet; to accuse'

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...wdb=ONW&id=ID80

greet (v.)

Old English gretan "to come in contact with" (in sense of "attack, accost" as well as "salute, welcome," and "touch, take hold of, handle"), from West Germanic *grotjan (cf. Old Saxon grotian, Old Frisian greta, Dutch groeten, Old High German gruozen, German grüßen "to salute, greet"), perhaps originally "to resound" (via notion of "cause to speak"), causative of Proto-Germanic *grætanan, root of Old English grætan (Anglian gretan) "weep, bewail," from PIE *gher- "to call out." Greet still can mean "cry, weep" in Scottish & northern England dialect, though this might be from a different root. Grætan is probably also the source of the second element in regret.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

grēt 4, afries., M.: nhd. Gruß, Klage; ne. greeting (N.), complaint; Vw.: s. -kam-pa,

-man-n, -man-n-skrÆ-v-ere, -wor-d, -wer-d-ere; Q.: W; E.: s. germ. *greutan (1)?,

st. V., weinen; L.: Hh 36a, Hh 159, Rh 783b

grē-t-a 24, afries., sw. V. (1): nhd. grüßen, klagen, anklagen; ne. greet, complain,

accuse; Vw.: s. bi-; Hw.: vgl. an. grãta, ae. grêtan, as. grætian, ahd. gruozen; Q.: S,

W, E, AA 15; E.: germ. *grætjan, sw. V., weinen machen, reden machen,

anschreien, grüßen; idg. *ghrēd-, V., weinen, Pokorny 439; s. idg. *gher- (1), V.,

rasseln, lärmen, gurgeln, murren, Pokorny 439; W.: nfries. groetjen, V., grüßen; L.:

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

.

lol it wasn't overlooked - I asked if greet was the English version of kreta in the first post when I questioned the word - because it was all I could imagine krete could be with a g change - but then got off track - because it didn't seem to still be kreta in Frisian.

The Apostle thing took my attention - because it seemed something that might be included - if it was a hoax - in keeping in tune with the rest of the OLB.

I agree ' wild cries' - with cries based in greet etymology sounds fair.

greet (v.)

Old English gretan "to come in contact with" (in sense of "attack, accost"

Would be interesting to know of any form of this word was found for Crete..

Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek"

Edited by The Puzzler

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I meant overlooked when we thought there was no equivalent in Old Frisian. And apparently there was.

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Posted (edited)

I meant overlooked when we thought there was no equivalent in Old Frisian. And apparently there was.

I wondered why it was no form of Kreta, only greta - like it had never been kreta in Frisian - English doesn't have it.

Edited by The Puzzler

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I wondered why it was no form of Kreta, only greta - like it had never been kreta in Frisian - English doesn't have it.

And even in modern Frisian they don't have a word like "kreta". The modern and old Frisians use(d) a word akin to English "scream" or better, the Dutch "schreeuw" (just change the -CH- for a -K- and there it is).

It looks like OLB-ian borrowed a word from Middle Dutch...

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And even in modern Frisian they don't have a word like "kreta". The modern and old Frisians use(d) a word akin to English "scream" or better, the Dutch "schreeuw" (just change the -CH- for a -K- and there it is).

It looks like OLB-ian borrowed a word from Middle Dutch...

Looks like it but that's why I'm exploring the other possibilities.

cry and greet might even be connected underneath.

cry (v.)

early 13c., "beg, implore," from Old French crier, from Vulgar Latin *critare, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek"

This looks similar to Linear B imo - not the same but the beginning is there - ke-re sound The current name of Crete first appears in Mycenaean Greek as ke-re-si-jo "Cretan" in Linear B texts. In Ancient Greek, the name Crete (Κρήτη) first appears in Homer's Odyssey.[4] Its etymology is unknown.

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Posted (edited)

Looks like it but that's why I'm exploring the other possibilities.

cry and greet might even be connected underneath.

cry (v.)

early 13c., "beg, implore," from Old French crier, from Vulgar Latin *critare, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek"

This looks similar to Linear B imo - not the same but the beginning is there - ke-re sound The current name of Crete first appears in Mycenaean Greek as ke-re-si-jo "Cretan" in Linear B texts. In Ancient Greek, the name Crete (Κρήτη) first appears in Homer's Odyssey.[4] Its etymology is unknown.

An old fashioned Dutch verb is ""krijten", and the -ij- is pronounced somewhere between -ay in "hay" and -igh in "high". Its meaning is "to shriek" or "to scream". In modern Dutch it is "krijsen".

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...VMNW&id=ID84832

Funny that you post this:

The current name of Crete first appears in Mycenaean Greek as ke-re-si-jo

ke-re-si-jo .. krijsen....

LOL

.

Edited by Abramelin

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This guy seems to think the Phoenicians not only turned up in Cadiz ,Spain .. but were Indian/Afghan Panis before they even moved to Phoenicia

http://phoenicia.org/rigveda.html

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Posted (edited)

This guy seems to think the Phoenicians not only turned up in Cadiz ,Spain .. but were Indian/Afghan Panis before they even moved to Phoenicia

http://phoenicia.org/rigveda.html

Maybe you should read the theory of Dr Nissim Raphael Ganor:

http://www.whowerethephoenicians.com/

His whole book online:

http://www.whowereth.../free-chapters/

(...)

Thus having eliminated one possibility, it remains for us

to conclude that Herodotus most probably includes the Israelites under the

term "Phoenicians".

According to Herodotus (Vii – 89) "These Phoenicians dwelt in old time,

as they say, by the Red Sea, Passing over from thence, they now inhabit

the sea coast of Syria."9 Which sea does Herodotus call the Red Sea? In his

writings we find that the river Euphrates flows from Armenia and empties

into the Red Sea,10 and that the Tigris also flows into the Red Sea.11 We are

led to assume that Herodotus' Red Sea is today's Persian Gulf, and there are

scholars who believe this to be so.12

(...)

We have already discussed in previous chapters the indubitable

conclusion, based on the el–Amarna tablets and the Bible, that the region

of Sidon, generally accepted as a "Phoenician" region, was conquered by the

tribe of Asher. It was shown that names such as Tyrian and Sidonian do not

specifically mean Canaanites. Any citizen of Tyre or Sidon was called Tyrian

or Sidonian, and these names cannot be equated with the term Canaanite, as

accepted today. We have now seen that if Herodotus tells us anything about

the Israelites it must be looked for under the term "Phoenicians". When

Diodorus gives a summary account of the Jewish origins, he describes them

as aliens in Egypt, of whom "the most outstanding and active among them"

are referred to as Phoenicians. We may therefore definitely conclude that the

term "Phoenicians" is the Greek name for the nation of Israel.

http://www.whowereth...)_p175-p180.pdf

The most like place of their origin is -according to Ganor- in what's now Saudi Arabia.

+++

EDIT:

Correct (= unbroken) link:

http://www.whowerethephoenicians.com/wp-content/uploads/book/phenicos_new%20(2)_p175-p180.pdf

.

Edited by Abramelin

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In part-1 of this thread we had a discussion about the OLB word ULK, which doesn't mean "cloud", but "hulk", a kind of boat:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=184645&st=10620#entry4226730

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=184645&st=10635#entry4227052

KyreniaII_Ship_Sailing_In_Open_Sea_500_bg.jpg

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

Now this:

Uluburun shipwreck:

Peter Kuniholm of Cornell University was assigned the task of dendrochronological dating in order to obtain an absolute date for the ship. The results date the wood at 1305 BC, but given that no bark has survived it is impossible to determine an exact date and it can be assumed that the ship sank sometime after that date.] Based on ceramic evidence, it appears that the Uluburun sank toward the end of the Amarna period, but could not have sunk before the time of Nefertiti due to the unique gold scarab engraved with her name found aboard the ship. For now, a conclusion that the ship sank at the end of the 14th century BC is accepted.

The origins of the objects aboard the ship range geographically from northern Europe to Africa, as far west as Sicily, and as far east as Mesopotamia. They appear to be the products of nine or ten cultures.[10] These proveniences indicate that the Late Bronze Age Aegean was the medium of an international trade perhaps based on royal gift-giving in the Near East.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uluburun_shipwreck

http://sara.theellisschool.org/~shipwreck/artifacts.html

A Bronze Age Shipwreck at Ulu Burun (Kaş): 1984 CampaignAuthor(s): George F. BassSource:

American Journal of Archaeology,

Vol. 90, No. 3 (Jul., 1986), pp. 269-296Published by: Archaeological Institute of America

http://www.scribd.com/doc/53923310/Uluburun-Bass-AJA-1986

003-bodrum-uluburun-schip.jpg

http://www.bodrum.nl/place/schip-van-uluburun/

uluburun.jpg

http://www.tour-turkey.com/one-year-in-kas.htm

uluburun2.jpg

http://www.foca-marsilya.info/eng_uluburun2reanimasyonprojesi.htm

F3.large.jpg

Simplified reconstruction of the Uluburun ship showing loaded goods and approximate locations of land snails during transit. Cargo compounds from bow to stern: technical utilities, stone anchors, 4th, 3rd and 2nd row of copper ingots, stone anchors, storage jars (pithoi), pilgrim flasks, first row of copper ingots, Canaanite amphoras with terebinth resin, tin ingots, storage jars (pithoi), various valuable merchandise. Xky – Xeropicta krynickii, Xla – Xerocrassa langloisiana.

http://mollus.oxfordjournals.org/content/74/1/79/F3.expansion

http://mollus.oxfordjournals.org/content/74/1/79.full.pdf+html

http://www.merchantnetworks.com.au/periods/1775before/larrywest.htm

With the evidence provided from the cargo on the ship it can be assumed that the ship set sail from either a Cypriot or Syro-Palestinian port. The Uluburun ship was undoubtedly sailing to the region west of Cyprus, but her ultimate destination can be concluded only from the distribution of objects matching the types carried on board. It has been proposed that perhaps the ship’s destination was Rhodes, which was at the time an important redistribution center for the Aegean.

http://www.digplanet.com/wiki/Uluburun_shipwreck

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Posted (edited)

"It has been proposed that perhaps the ship’s destination was Rhodes, which was at the time an important redistribution center for the Aegean."

From the OLB:

NOW I WILL RELATE HOW THE GEERTMAN AND MANY FOLLOWERS OF HELLENIA CAME BACK.

(...)

After nêi gvng Dêmêtrius lâs vp Hrodus thêr hinne brochton wi sina salt-âtha ând liftochta wr. Thâ wi tha leste rêis to Hrodus kêmon, was orloch vrtyan. Dêmêtrius was nêi Athenia fâren.

Daar-na ging Demetrius los op Rodos, daar heen brachten we zijn soldaten en leeftochten over. Toen we de laatste reis te Rodos kwamen, was oorlog over. Demetrius was naa Athene (ge)varen.

Sandbach:

Afterwards, Demetrius (fiercely) attacked Rhodes, and we transported thither his soldiers and provisions. When we made our last voyage to Rhodes, the war was finished (= over). Demetrius had sailed to Athens.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bp

____

vrtyan

for-ti-õ 20, ur-ti-õ, afries., st. V. (2): nhd. aufschieben, verzichten auf, weggehen,

abreißen, zurückziehen, zurückweichen, verweigern, verlassen (V.), aufgeben, im

Stich lassen; ne. postpone, renounce, retreat (V.), refuse, desert (V.); ÜG.: lat.

deficere L 6; Q.: W, R, H, E, B, S, L 6; E.: s. for- (1), ti-õ (1); W.: nfries.

fortjean;

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

salt-âtha

It's obvious the OLB salt-âtha means (DU:) "soldaten", soldiers, but they fabricated an 'ancient' spelling that would translate like "salt-friends", 'friends of salt'. because the OLB uses "atha" as a word for friends.

In reality it means something entirely different:

a-th-th-a 40, a-t-t-a, e-t-t-a* (2), afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Geschworener; ne.

juryman; Vw.: s. dik-, *e-, un-e-, ze-r-k-, -man-n; Hw.: s. ê-th-a (1); Q.: R, W, S,

Schw; E.: s. ê-th; W.: nfries. aita

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

.

Edited by Abramelin

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vrtyan

for-ti-õ 20, ur-ti-õ, afries., st. V. (2): nhd. aufschieben, verzichten auf, weggehen,

abreißen, zurückziehen, zurückweichen, verweigern, verlassen (V.), aufgeben, im

Stich lassen; ne. postpone, renounce, retreat (V.), refuse, desert (V.); ÜG.: lat.

deficere L 6; Q.: W, R, H, E, B, S, L 6; E.: s. for- (1), ti-õ (1); W.: nfries.

fortjean;

Dutch: "verdoen" (verb), English: to waste, squander, dissipate, fling away

(Dutch "doen" is English "to do")

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"It has been proposed that perhaps the ship’s destination was Rhodes, which was at the time an important redistribution center for the Aegean."

From the OLB:

NOW I WILL RELATE HOW THE GEERTMAN AND MANY FOLLOWERS OF HELLENIA CAME BACK.

(...)

After nêi gvng Dêmêtrius lâs vp Hrodus thêr hinne brochton wi sina salt-âtha ând liftochta wr. Thâ wi tha leste rêis to Hrodus kêmon, was orloch vrtyan. Dêmêtrius was nêi Athenia fâren.

Daar-na ging Demetrius los op Rodos, daar heen brachten we zijn soldaten en leeftochten over. Toen we de laatste reis te Rodos kwamen, was oorlog over. Demetrius was naa Athene (ge)varen.

Sandbach:

Afterwards, Demetrius (fiercely) attacked Rhodes, and we transported thither his soldiers and provisions. When we made our last voyage to Rhodes, the war was finished (= over). Demetrius had sailed to Athens.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bp

____

vrtyan

for-ti-õ 20, ur-ti-õ, afries., st. V. (2): nhd. aufschieben, verzichten auf, weggehen,

abreißen, zurückziehen, zurückweichen, verweigern, verlassen (V.), aufgeben, im

Stich lassen; ne. postpone, renounce, retreat (V.), refuse, desert (V.); ÜG.: lat.

deficere L 6; Q.: W, R, H, E, B, S, L 6; E.: s. for- (1), ti-õ (1); W.: nfries.

fortjean;

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

salt-âtha

It's obvious the OLB salt-âtha means (DU:) "soldaten", soldiers, but they fabricated an 'ancient' spelling that would translate like "salt-friends", 'friends of salt'. because the OLB uses "atha" as a word for friends.

In reality it means something entirely different:

a-th-th-a 40, a-t-t-a, e-t-t-a* (2), afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Geschworener; ne.

juryman; Vw.: s. dik-, *e-, un-e-, ze-r-k-, -man-n; Hw.: s. ê-th-a (1); Q.: R, W, S,

Schw; E.: s. ê-th; W.: nfries. aita

http://koeblergerhar...rieswbhinw.html

.

I think Soldiers (Sold-aten) are called like that because they are payed to be loyal (be-zold-iging).

Soldij is the pay, and in Romain times soldiers were payed with salt.

I like your posts :-)

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Posted (edited)

I think Soldiers (Sold-aten) are called like that because they are payed to be loyal (be-zold-iging).

Soldij is the pay, and in Romain times soldiers were payed with salt.

I like your posts :-)

Thanks Van Gorp.

But "soldaten" or "soldier" is derived from medieval Latin. You really think that the Romans soldiers were paid ("soldij") in salt after they had fought for their empire and risking their lives for years on end?

+++

EDIT:

According to De Vries it is derived from Latin "solidus", or a golden coin.

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/soldaat

.

Edited by Abramelin

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