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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I don't think that's what they mean: what would it prove or disprove if a granddaughter owns a photo of her grandfather? But it would certainly look like a clue if it was Over de Linden's granddaughter who owned a photo of HaverSchmidt.

It could even be Verwijs' granddaughter....

This is a passage just before the one of my former post:

In de correspondentie rondom het boek trof men een briefje van Verwijs

aan dat nota bene op hetzelfde, in die tijd bijzondere ‘Engelse’ papier was

geschreven. ‘Te toevallig om toevallig te zijn,’ grinnikt Kardinaal. En zo liet,

na Over de Linden, ook Verwijs zich als medeplichtige betrappen.

In English:

In the correspondence about the book they found a note from Verwijs that was really written on the same, for that time special 'English paper'. "Too coincidental to be a coicidence," Kardinaal chuckles. And that's how, after Over de Linden, also Verwijs let himself be caught as an accomplice.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I don't think that's what they mean: what would it prove or disprove if a granddaughter owns a photo of her grandfather? But it would certainly look like a clue if it was Over de Linden's granddaughter who owned a photo of HaverSchmidt.

Jensma still hopes to find proof that HaverSchmidt did it, because he knows his job is not well done.

He hopes that a letter will appear in which he confesses that he was involved.

That photo simply shows that after all these years, still unknown material from/ about HaverSchmidt can surface.

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In the correspondence about the book they found a note from Verwijs that was really written on the same, for that time special 'English paper'. "Too coincidental to be a coicidence," Kardinaal chuckles. And that's how, after Over de Linden, also Verwijs let himself be caught as an accomplice.

I cannot believe these people are serious.

Here is the fragment prior to yours.

Het ontsluiten van hout was een specifiek Amerikaanse procédé, in 1866 voor het eerst commercieel toegepast in Pennsylvania en in een Engelse papierfabriek in Gloucestershire. Omdat het Oera Linda-papier sodapulp bevat, wat wijst op ontsloten hout, dateert het van minimaal 26 jaar later dan altijd werd aangenomen.

The unlocking of wood was a specific American procedure, for the first time commercially applied in 1866 in Pennsylvania and in an English paper factory in Gloucestershire. Because the Oera Linda-paper contains sodapulp, which suggests unlocked wood, it dates of minimally 26 years later than always was assumed.

How realistic is this, really?

In 1867 OdL started trying to have the manuscript translated, and he would have written it in less than one year previously, when he was already an old man, and on the newest possible paper available?!

This is totally insane.

They have not proven that the OLB paper is from that English factory, only that it contains sodapulp, "which suggests unlocked wood".

They are not even sure that Verwijs' paper is the same.

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Jensma still hopes to find proof that HaverSchmidt did it, because he knows his job is not well done.

He hopes that a letter will appear in which he confesses that he was involved.

That photo simply shows that after all these years, still unknown material from/ about HaverSchmidt can surface.

No, of course he has no 100% proof that his theory is correct: the socalled suspects - Over de Linden, Verwijs, Halbertsma and HaverSchmidt - all died 120 years ago.

But one letter with a confession is enough to settle the whole thing.

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Posted (edited)

I cannot believe these people are serious.

Here is the fragment prior to yours.

Het ontsluiten van hout was een specifiek Amerikaanse procédé, in 1866 voor het eerst commercieel toegepast in Pennsylvania en in een Engelse papierfabriek in Gloucestershire. Omdat het Oera Linda-papier sodapulp bevat, wat wijst op ontsloten hout, dateert het van minimaal 26 jaar later dan altijd werd aangenomen.

The unlocking of wood was a specific American procedure, for the first time commercially applied in 1866 in Pennsylvania and in an English paper factory in Gloucestershire. Because the Oera Linda-paper contains sodapulp, which suggests unlocked wood, it dates of minimally 26 years later than always was assumed.

How realistic is this, really?

In 1867 OdL started trying to have the manuscript translated, and he would have written it in less than one year previously, when he was already an old man, and on the newest possible paper available?!

This is totally insane.

They have not proven that the OLB paper is from that English factory, only that it contains sodapulp, "which suggests unlocked wood".

They are not even sure that Verwijs' paper is the same.

Jesus, lol.

CodL had the mansucript ready, or most of it. Then he buys that special paper, makes it look as old as the former version, and voila.

I think I can make such a copy in a week.

OK, maybe a month, heh.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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CodL had the mansucript ready, or most of it. Then he buys that special paper, makes it look as old as the former version, and voila.

I respect your belief.

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Posted (edited)

I respect your belief.

But it is at least not as insane as you suggested.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

No, of course he has no 100% proof that his theory is correct: the socalled suspects - Over de Linden, Verwijs, Halbertsma and HaverSchmidt - all died 120 years ago.

But one letter with a confession is enough to settle the whole thing.

LOL, I am a 100% sure that when they find that letter, it will be considered a hoax!!

.

Edited by Abramelin

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But it is at least not as insane as you suggested.

So you would use paper that is made with a technique that is only used since let's say 2011?

LOL, I am a 100% sure that when they find that letter, it will be considered a hoax!!

And I am a 100% sure they will never find such a letter, because it never existed.

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Posted (edited)

So you would use paper that is made with a technique that is only used since let's say 2011?

If I found out it was better suited for manipulation (= make it look old), then yes.

You cannot just use any kind of paper.

,

Edited by Abramelin

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If the paper is proven to be from that Gloucestershire factory, they should clearly say so.

They don't, they are merely suggesting it.

"The Oera Linda-paper contains sodapulp, which suggests unlocked wood."

First let them clearly prove and state that it is from that factory.

Until then I will not take them seriously.

Again, I am the skeptic here, not you.

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If the paper is proven to be from that Gloucestershire factory, they should clearly say so.

They don't, they are merely suggesting it.

"The Oera Linda-paper contains sodapulp, which suggests unlocked wood."

First let them clearly prove and state that it is from that factory.

Until then I will not take them seriously.

Again, I am the skeptic here, not you.

Well, how nice for you.

But let me repeat: wait for the end of this year when they have published all their results.

And let's hope we won't have to beg for it.

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Posted (edited)

If the paper is proven to be from that Gloucestershire factory, they should clearly say so.

They don't, they are merely suggesting it.

"The Oera Linda-paper contains sodapulp, which suggests unlocked wood."

First let them clearly prove and state that it is from that factory.

Until then I will not take them seriously.

Again, I am the skeptic here, not you.

Everybody can read for themselves:

http://oeralinda.blogspot.nl/2012/06/oera-linda-boek-literary-forgery-and.html

OLBpaper7.jpg

Edited by Abramelin

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Okke min svn.

Thissa boka mot i mith lif aend sêle wârja. Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk âk fon vsa êthlum. Vrlêden jêr haeb ik tham ut-er flod hred tolik mith thi aend thinra moder. Tha hja wêron wet wrden; thêr thrvch gvngon hja aefternei vrdarva. Vmbe hja navt to vrlysa haeb ik-ra vp wrlandisk pampyer wrskrêven.

Sa hwersa thu se erve, mot hu se âk wrskryva. Thin baern alsa til thju hja nimmerthe wêi navt ne kvma.

Skrêven to Ljuwert. Nêi âtland svnken is thaet thria thû sond fjvwer hvndred aend njugon aend fjvwertigoste jêr, thaet is nei kersten rêknong that tvelfhvndred sex aend fiftigoste jêr. Hidde tobinomath oera Linda. - Wâk.

OKKE MY SON—

You must preserve these books with body and soul. They contain the history of all our people, as well as of our forefathers. Last year I saved them in the flood, as well as you and your mother; but they got wet, and therefore began to perish. In order not to lose them, I copied them on foreign paper.

In case you inherit them, you must copy them likewise, and your children must do so too, so that they may never be lost.

Written at Liuwert, in the three thousand four hundred and forty-ninth year after Atland was submerged—that is, according to the Christian reckoning, the year 1256.

Hiddo, surnamed Oera Linda.—Watch.

wrlandisk = overlands = foreign.

CodL must have thought: let's continue a good, old and solid tradition....

Anyway - now comes the 'insane' part - how was Ireland called in Old Frisian??

"Wrland" , maybe??

:P

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If it was a hoax and the supposed makers appearantly made supernatural efforts to create an illusion of authenticity, why would they include things that made it totally unbelievable (in that time), like the story of Jes-us from Kasamir, and many other examples?

In this thread it became clear that the ideas in it, that in the 19th century were seen as absolutely outrageous, are all, in fact possibly true.

One needs some psychological logic to see this.

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Posted (edited)

If it was a hoax and the supposed makers appearantly made supernatural efforts to create an illusion of authenticity, why would they include things that made it totally unbelievable (in that time), like the story of Jes-us from Kasamir, and many other examples?

In this thread it became clear that the ideas in it, that in the 19th century were seen as absolutely outrageous, are all, in fact possibly true.

One needs some psychological logic to see this.

I wouldn't want to call it 'supernatural efforts', but it sure must have been a lot of work.

The things that might have made it unbelievable at the time were known, but not generally known.

The Jesus in Kashmir thing was known, and mentioned by that French author I forgot the name of, but at least a Cornelis Over de Liinden had read his book.

In fact it was a really great tactic: critics would say such and such was nonsense, but that was just because the creators of the OLB expected the critics to be unaware of the availability of certain info.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Another argument for the OLB's authenticity is the fact that it mentions lung disease in cattle before it was known...

1778 3 October, Ds. Eelco Alta te Bozum heeft een uitvoerig artikel in de Leeuwarder Courant over de nieuw ontdekte longziekte der kalveren. 1778 28 November, De Maatschappij ter Bevordering van Landbouw te Amsterdam besluit uit te geven: Verhaal van de inentingen verricht op kalveren door Ds. E. Alta te Bozum. Tot zover enige wetenswaardige berichten over ons familielid ds. Eelco (Eelko) Alta, predikant, patriot en amateur-wetenschapper inzake veeziekten.

1778, October 3, Ds. Eelco Alta Bozum has a detailed article in the Leeuwarden Courant (a newspaper) about the newly discovered lung disease of calves. 1778 November 28, the Society for Promoting Agriculture, in Amsterdam, decided to issue: Tale of the vaccinations carried out on calves by Ds. E. Alta in Bozum. So far, all posts worth knowing about our family Rev. Eelco (Eelko) Alta, preacher, patriot and amateur scientist on cattle diseases

http://www.alta.name/anekdotes/eelko.htm

Vicar, preacher, patriot and amature scientist: the Frisian Eelco Alta, 1778.

He treated cattle (vaccinations) that suffered from lung disease already in the 18th century, and published his findings.

Just to show lung-disease of cattle was known LONG before the OLB was published.

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Posted (edited)

From Dutch Wiki (translated into English):

Boaz (Biblical name)

The name Boaz means "In Him is force/ power".

http://nl.wikipedia....(Bijbelse_naam)

Like so many names from antiquity, this name can be explained by a Dutch/ Frisian word, in this case 'baas'/ 'baes' (English: boss).

Some OLB fragments with it:

THA BÁSA ÀND HJARA STORSTA SVNUM

FORSTA. GRÉVA. RÉDJÉVAR ÀND ALLE BÁSA ÀND MÁSTERA

ÀND ÉNIS BÁS SKOLDE WERTHA OVIR ALLE KÉNINGKRIK JRTHA.S

WAS THENE MÁGÍ BÁS WRDEN OVIR SKÉNLANDIS ASTAR DÉL

HWAND THENE MAGÍ WRDE BÁS

IK HÀV THI FRÉJETH JEFTH IK BÁS SKILDE WERTHA

THRJU JÉR LÉTTER WÉR THENE MÁGÍ BÁS

ALSA NÉARCHUS THÉR SELVA NÉN BÁS OVIR BILÍWA NE KV

NÉNE ORA MÁSTERA NACH FORSTA NER BÁSA

THÉRVMBE SKIL.ER ÁK BÁS ÀND RJUCHTER OVIR WÉSA

Edited by Otharus

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Posted (edited)

From Dutch Wiki (translated into English):

Boaz (Biblical name)

The name Boaz means "In Him is force/ power".

http://nl.wikipedia....(Bijbelse_naam)

Like so many names from antiquity, this name can be explained by a Dutch/ Frisian word, in this case 'baas'/ 'baes' (English: boss).

Some OLB fragments with it:

THA BÁSA ÀND HJARA STORSTA SVNUM

FORSTA. GRÉVA. RÉDJÉVAR ÀND ALLE BÁSA ÀND MÁSTERA

ÀND ÉNIS BÁS SKOLDE WERTHA OVIR ALLE KÉNINGKRIK JRTHA.S

WAS THENE MÁGÍ BÁS WRDEN OVIR SKÉNLANDIS ASTAR DÉL

HWAND THENE MAGÍ WRDE BÁS

IK HÀV THI FRÉJETH JEFTH IK BÁS SKILDE WERTHA

THRJU JÉR LÉTTER WÉR THENE MÁGÍ BÁS

ALSA NÉARCHUS THÉR SELVA NÉN BÁS OVIR BILÍWA NE KV

NÉNE ORA MÁSTERA NACH FORSTA NER BÁSA

THÉRVMBE SKIL.ER ÁK BÁS ÀND RJUCHTER OVIR WÉSA

Yes, this apart from anything else, convinces me the OLB is true, at least as far as the story itself goes, whether the book is authentic is 2nd to me, the story and history imo is true and correct.

I continue to see this, no other base words will radiate out as much as the Frisian ones, they seem the only probable root words for all the other words imo.

Edited by The Puzzler

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From Dutch Wiki (translated into English):

Boaz (Biblical name)

The name Boaz means "In Him is force/ power".

http://nl.wikipedia....(Bijbelse_naam)

Like so many names from antiquity, this name can be explained by a Dutch/ Frisian word, in this case 'baas'/ 'baes' (English: boss).

Now try that for "Jachin", the other pillar.

Yes, this apart from anything else, convinces me the OLB is true, at least as far as the story itself goes, whether the book is authentic is 2nd to me, the story and history imo is true and correct.

I continue to see this, no other base words will radiate out as much as the Frisian ones, they seem the only probable root words for all the other words imo.

Playing with words will never prove the OLB.

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Now try that for "Jachin", the other pillar.

Playing with words will never prove the OLB.

Which reminds me, do you have the link on hand to the Frisian Dictionary we use? I can't find it anywhere and lost everything on my computer last week.

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Which reminds me, do you have the link on hand to the Frisian Dictionary we use? I can't find it anywhere and lost everything on my computer last week.

Here's all the dictionaries I link to on my blogspot:

dictionarylist.jpg

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Playing with words will never prove the OLB.

So you donot know that the greatest discoveries ever made were the result of 'playing'?!

:D HAHAHA!

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Here's all the dictionaries I link to on my blogspot:

dictionarylist.jpg

Thanks, I did look here but nothing sounded familiar or the few I chose were not it - but I did find it here when I looked again, it's this one I like best...

http://www.koeblergerhard.de/afrieswbhinw.html

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Posted (edited)

Jachin is really Yakin and means founding and really sounds like 'ya kin'- which my founders were, my kin.

Definition:

group of people related by blood or marriage

Class:

group noun (groupings of people and objects)

Related to:

kinship

Plural:

kins

Type of:

social group » grouping » abstraction » entity

Original source:

Princeton WordNet

Examples:

clansman | family unit | folks | genealogy | Lost Tribes | mishpocha | relative | totem | tribesman | Twelve Tribes of Israel

Synonyms:

clan | kin group | kindred | kinship group | tribe

Etymology:

Middle English kin, kyn, ken, kun, from Old English cynn ("kind, sort, rank,...

(Source: Wiktionary) [more]

http://www.memidex.c...in social-group

Edited by The Puzzler

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