Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 11
Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

BEJIN

begin (v.) Look up begin at Dictionary.comOld English beginnan "to begin, attempt, undertake," a rare word beside the more usual form onginnan (class III strong verb; past tense ongann, past participle ongunnen); from bi- (see be-) + West Germanic *ginnan, of obscure meaning and found only in compounds, perhaps "to open, open up" (compare Old High German in-ginnan "to cut open, open up," also "begin, undertake"), with sense evolution from "open" to "begin." Cognates elsewhere in Germanic include Old Frisian biginna "to begin," Middle Dutch beghinnen, Old High German beginnan, German beginnen, Old Frisian bijenna "to begin," Gothic duginnan.

http://www.etymonlin....php?term=begin

So, they have no idea, "perhaps" to 'open up' from an obscure meaning. in-ginnan is slightly different for to cut open imo, it's in+go = to go in (side) ie; surgery - the ginnan remains the same, the prefix makes a different word meaning.

BI+GAN = be go - on the go - be going - (commence, start)

bi-, afries., Präf.: nhd. be...; ne. be..., at (Pref.), on

gān 9, gā-n, afries., anom. V.: nhd. gehen; ne. go (V.);

This is where the proof lies imo, and the OLB has given numerous examples of root words, that can only be made up into the meanings and words from Frisian.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

So, I wonder if Makkum has any chance of being Lumkamakia..?

About Lumkamakia, I have now an idea totally different from what i was looking before.

Not as much for the meaning of Lum, Loom, Leem like meanings ... that all can stand but more in the figurative meaning, contrary to the possible toponyms.

I'm not convinced 100% percent anymore we should actually look for a place called Lumkamakia.

The sentence and context goes like this

"Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us. Ênes was er hêrman wêst"

So Wodin was leisuring from his 'army' or soldier activities at his parents home.

"To Lumka Makja" -> om een luimke te doen -> om te luieren -> om te ontspannen -> to relax

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...id=M037959.re.5

edit:

More to build a case for this:

Gent's dialect (Gent = Capital City of East Flanders):

afternoon nap/middagdutje: luimke

http://www.mijnwoord...ct/gents&page=3

And from the first link on the verb "luimen" it is stated that it is only used presently as bargoens and soldierlanguage !

If we see that Gent's dialect is using 'luim-ke' (diminuitive for luim) to describe reposing, we can imagine the link between East Flanders (Ast Flyland?) en Fries Dialect.

Edited by Van Gorp
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About Lumkamakia, I have now an idea totally different from what i was looking before.

Not as much for the meaning of Lum, Loom, Leem like meanings ... that all can stand but more in the figurative meaning, contrary to the possible toponyms.

I'm not convinced 100% percent anymore we should actually look for a place called Lumkamakia.

The sentence and context goes like this

"Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us. Ênes was er hêrman wêst"

So Wodin was leisuring from his 'army' or soldier activities at his parents home.

"To Lumka Makja" -> om een luimke te doen -> om te luieren -> om te ontspannen -> to relax

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...id=M037959.re.5

(...)

More to build a case for this:

Gent's dialect (Gent = Capital City of East Flanders):

afternoon nap/middagdutje: luimke

http://www.mijnwoord...ct/gents&page=3

And from the first link on the verb "luimen" it is stated that it is only used presently as bargoens and soldierlanguage !

If we see that Gent's dialect is using 'luim-ke' (diminuitive for luim) to describe reposing, we can imagine the link between East Flanders (Ast Flyland?) en Fries Dialect.

Excellent, Van Gorp, congratulations!

This indeed seems like the best interpretation to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

About Lumkamakia, I have now an idea totally different from what i was looking before.

Not as much for the meaning of Lum, Loom, Leem like meanings ... that all can stand but more in the figurative meaning, contrary to the possible toponyms.

I'm not convinced 100% percent anymore we should actually look for a place called Lumkamakia.

The sentence and context goes like this

"Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us. Ênes was er hêrman wêst"

So Wodin was leisuring from his 'army' or soldier activities at his parents home.

"To Lumka Makja" -> om een luimke te doen -> om te luieren -> om te ontspannen -> to relax

http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...id=M037959.re.5

edit:

More to build a case for this:

Gent's dialect (Gent = Capital City of East Flanders):

afternoon nap/middagdutje: luimke

http://www.mijnwoord...ents&page=3

And from the first link on the verb "luimen" it is stated that it is only used presently as bargoens and soldierlanguage !

If we see that Gent's dialect is using 'luim-ke' (diminuitive for luim) to describe reposing, we can imagine the link between East Flanders (Ast Flyland?) en Fries Dialect.

OK, I can see it could say that:

He may have been on rest at his parents home, if Lumka Makia is not Makkum. That's the tricky thing with the OLB, we don't actually know which letters are capitals, so the word lumkamakia may not be a place name at all.

luimke/nap imo is still based in lame, slow, lounging = resting

Wodin thene/then aldeste/oldest hemde/homed to lumka makia be there/near the Emude to astflyland by sin/his eldrum/parents t-us/house.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

how does foddik mean lamp?

I can't even find it in the Frisian dictionary.

Jon nam thêre foddik fon Kaelta aend hira fàmna mitha, aend Minerva hild hira ajn foddik aend hira ajn fàmna.

Jon took the lamp of Kalta and her maidens with him. Min-erva retained her lamp and her own maidens.

Anyone got an idea on foddik for lamp...?

food (n.) Old English foda "food, nourishment; fuel," also figurative, from Proto-Germanic *fodon (cognates: Gothic fodeins), from Germanic root *fod-, equivalent of PIE *pa- "to tend, keep, pasture, to protect, to guard, to feed" (cognates: Greek pateisthai "to feed;" Latin pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd," literally "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" Old Church Slavonic pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Russian pishcha "food").

to protect, to guard = the lamp.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how does foddik mean lamp?

I can't even find it in the Frisian dictionary.

Jon nam thêre foddik fon Kaelta aend hira fàmna mitha, aend Minerva hild hira ajn foddik aend hira ajn fàmna.

Jon took the lamp of Kalta and her maidens with him. Min-erva retained her lamp and her own maidens.

Anyone got an idea on foddik for lamp...?

food (n.) Old English foda "food, nourishment; fuel," also figurative, from Proto-Germanic *fodon (cognates: Gothic fodeins), from Germanic root *fod-, equivalent of PIE *pa- "to tend, keep, pasture, to protect, to guard, to feed" (cognates: Greek pateisthai "to feed;" Latin pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd," literally "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" Old Church Slavonic pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Russian pishcha "food").

to protect, to guard = the lamp.

Well Puzz, this seems lingering on the same root -> lom-p.

I like your link with food, fodder, lively stock.

But on some other sentences foddik is associated with putting on (upstoken, aansteken) and fading (utga, uitgaan).

"thaen skil thju foddik naemer utgâ thêr ik far jo vpstoken haev."

I think the connection is vod, lomp (fuse/wick: lont), slap like old rags (lompen) used to keep a fire burning.

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/vod

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/lont

Vadsig is also flabby, s-lap -> vaddig or voddig (foddik?)

http://www.wnt.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article_content&wdb=WNT&id=M073119

A small fire/light: vaddig (fade) fire?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we see that Gent's dialect is using 'luim-ke' (diminuitive for luim) to describe reposing, we can imagine the link between East Flanders (Ast Flyland?) en Fries Dialect.

. Linguistically, the tribes in this area were under Celtic influence in the south, and Germanic influence in the east, but there is disagreement about what language was spoken locally, which may even have been an intermediate "Nordwestblock" language related to both.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flanders

However it is possible in Belgium that especially in the northern areas the Hallstatt and La Tène cultures were brought by new elites, and that the main language of the population was not Celtic.

On the other hand, linguists have proposed that there is evidence that the northern part of the Belgic population had previously spoken an Indo European language related to, but distinct from, Celtic and Germanic, and among the northern Belgae, Celtic may never have been the language of the majority. (See Belgian language and Nordwestblock.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Belgium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

See de Haan Hettema (1832), p.27: foddik - lamp

Ok thanks.

But how is foddik a lamp?

I tried to get the 'breaking news' on foddik as lamp from knuls site but I can't access it.

Van Gorp, you say wick, vod, bundle of sticks, so I'm thinking English wad.

Swedish vadd.

Could be fryan fod then, the lamp is the wadding, which became a wick, but yes, they did use a wad of something to light, in a lamp. For all I know, maybe they originally used a lump of blubber or such, a lump of Amber...

The word lamp could then be thought of as a lump. Dutch lomp, a rag.

Now the question could be, does lamp actually come from lum/luminous root, or does luminous words actually derive from an early concept for a lamp...? The vadd, the wad is a lump.

How could anyone get bored with this?

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

But how is foddik a lamp?

Greek φωτια (photia - fire, light) is related, hence photo.

Edited by gestur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Greek φωτιa (photia - fire, light) is related, hence photo.

Hmm interesting.

Fod gets to light.

Wad gets to licht to lumer

I'm convinced that the source of lum for light is in lump for the lamp and that this is also the root for luminous words, not the other way around.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
More to build a case for this:

Gent's dialect (Gent = Capital City of East Flanders):

afternoon nap/middagdutje: luimke

After having had a better look at the text, considering the word-order, I do after all think that Lumkamakja is a geographical (place) name, but the meaning could indeed be as you suggest; a place where people (sailors?) have a rest.

Or: the name means "to make a joke", "to make fun"

Lume, luumkin = scherts, grap, plezier

source: http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=MNW&id=27198&lemmodern=luim

OLB has some examples of geographical names derived from a historical (or mythical) event (Kaat's gat, Medea's blik).

The same could be the case here.

Anyway, great find, VG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

In case anyone didn't notice, that was NOT a Ligurian, but a Frisian, showing off his long auburn locks flowing with pride supreme on his neck.

Co-incidence? I think not.

According to Plutarch they (Ligurians) called themselves Ambrones, but this does not necessarily indicate a relationship with the Ambrones of northern Europe. Not necessarily but it also does not rule it out.

They weren't Celtic and they weren't Mediterranean, they spoke an Indo-European language and had been in Europe with the Iberians for a long time, was the held-thought.

They may have passed on their language to the people of Latium, who became known for their Latin language, which may have had its roots in Frisian to start, since a maritime trading people obviously had a more used, important language, these languages dominated. This is also how the Phoenician alphabet and language became so well used. This Frisian/Fryan/Ligurian language was taken on by Romans while the original Ligurian language, which would have been a form of Fryan - faded into obscurity - the Frisian roots being then in Latin and then Roman Latin.

This is how I can see it and why Latin may be made up of root words that came from Fryan, via Ligurian, since the Ligurians were imo the Fryans who had warehouses, sailed and traded in Italy.

Remember this one? (part -1-) :

http://www.proto-english.org/o21.html

The alternative Welsh word for the territory we call England today is Lloegr or Lloegyr ("Lloegr the lost land") in Welsh. Pronounce 'leuger'. The Welsh 'y' is a 'u' sound that no longer exist in English. It is the same 'u' as in French or German. Even in Old English, all 'y' have to be read as a French 'u'.

The etymology of Lloegr has always been unclear. The Loire river in France was called Liger in Latin. That word is temptingly close. Was it an old Azelian word for lowland? Or is Lloegr simply a Germanic loanword in old Welsh meaning lower land?

Compare with 'lager' in Dutch, possibly 'loager' in Old English, its modern cognate is 'low' and 'layer'. The oldest meaning of 'low' is flat, levelled, a plain.

Compare the possible semantic of Lloegyr with the one of 'Danes' : cognate in English is 'den' (= lair, low place), Danes were originally southern lowland people in Sweden, referring to the lowlands in the southern tip of Sweden.

.

Edited by Abramelin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I was first Abe ;-) : what is that all about, what coinicidence and where is the E-mude in Odense?

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Odense_River

The Odense River (Danish: Odense Å) is a river located on the island of Funen, in central Denmark.

......

Odense Å......

http://da.wikipedia....dense_Ã…

++++

EDIT:

The name Odense is derived from Odins , meaning "Odin's sanctuary" as the area was known as a sanctuary for worshippers of the Nordic god, Odin.[1]

Odense is one of Denmark's oldest cities. Archaeological excavations in the vicinity show proof of settlement for over 4,000 years since at least the Stone Age.[2][1] The earliest community was centred on the higher ground between the Odense River to the south and Naesbyhoved Lake (now dry) to the north. Nonnebakken, one of Denmark's former Viking ring fortresses, lay to the south of the river.[3] Today, Odense's Møntergården Museum has many artefacts related to the early Viking history in the Odense area.[4] The Vikings built numerous fortifications along the river banks to defend it against invaders coming in from the coast.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odense

.

Edited by Abramelin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember this one? (part -1-) :

http://www.proto-english.org/o21.html

The alternative Welsh word for the territory we call England today is Lloegr or Lloegyr ("Lloegr the lost land") in Welsh. Pronounce 'leuger'. The Welsh 'y' is a 'u' sound that no longer exist in English. It is the same 'u' as in French or German. Even in Old English, all 'y' have to be read as a French 'u'.

The etymology of Lloegr has always been unclear. The Loire river in France was called Liger in Latin. That word is temptingly close. Was it an old Azelian word for lowland? Or is Lloegr simply a Germanic loanword in old Welsh meaning lower land?

Compare with 'lager' in Dutch, possibly 'loager' in Old English, its modern cognate is 'low' and 'layer'. The oldest meaning of 'low' is flat, levelled, a plain.

Compare the possible semantic of Lloegyr with the one of 'Danes' : cognate in English is 'den' (= lair, low place), Danes were originally southern lowland people in Sweden, referring to the lowlands in the southern tip of Sweden.

.

Hi Abe, interesting and I think that that is actually the root for Liguria - even though Ligurians wasn't the Fryan name for themselves, but a Roman word, the roots for Latin as you noticed in my post, would come from Fryan, also we don't actually know if they named Liguria or not, maybe they did, Liguria may just be a Romanized form of the name they had named it, which would still be a form of Liger. from PIE *legh- "to lie" (see lie (v.2)).

In geographical usage, low refers to the part of a country near the sea-shore (c.1300, as in Low Countries "Holland, Belgium, Luxemburg," 1540s). As an adverb c.1200, from the adjective.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=low

250px-Liguria_in_Italy.svg.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

After having had a better look at the text, considering the word-order, I do after all think that Lumkamakja is a geographical (place) name, but the meaning could indeed be as you suggest; a place where people (sailors?) have a rest.

Or: the name means "to make a joke", "to make fun"

Lume, luumkin = scherts, grap, plezier

source: http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=luim

OLB has some examples of geographical names derived from a historical (or mythical) event (Kaat's gat, Medea's blik).

The same could be the case here.

Anyway, great find, VG

I'm a bit this way too.

At the mouth of rivers it's typically slow sailing, sluggish, muddy deltas make for slow sailing. At the mouth of a river indicates to me that the place is named after this reason.

lahm machen = paralyse - I believe lumka makia is a form of this phrase (lamma) (Funny enough Sterik actually may mean the same thing, stricken - see lam)

The context appears he 'homed to lumka-makia' - which is why the English translation may have 'lived' and even the transliteration has a capital as in a place name.

I also noticed in the sentence with Sterik - the word rested is there. Sterik rested at Aldergamude. "At Aldergamude there rested an old sea-king" http://www.rodinbook.nl/olbscans.html

resta* 3, re-s-t-a*, afries., sw. V. (1): nhd. rasten, ruhen; ne. rest (V.); Hw.: vgl. ae. rėstan, anfrk. resten, rastōn, as. restian, ahd. resten, rasten*; Q.: R, Jur, AA 22; E.: s. germ. *rastja, Sb., Ruhe, Rast; vgl. idg. *res-, *ros-, Sb., Ruhe, Rast, Pokorny 339; idg. *erə- (2), *rē- (4), V., ruhen, Pokorny 338; W.: nfries. resten, V., rasten, ruhen; W.: saterl. resta, V., rasten, ruhen; L.: Hh 87a, Rh 992b, AA 22

restelik 1 und häufiger, re-s-t-e-lik, afries., Adj.: nhd. ruhig; ne. quiet; E.: s. germ. *rastja, Sb., Ruhe, Rast; vgl. idg. *res-, *ros-, Sb., Ruhe, Rast, Pokorny 339; idg. *erə- (2), *rē- (4), V., ruhen, Pokorny 338; s. afries. -lik (3); L.: Hh 145b

restene 19, re-s-t-ene, afries., F.: nhd. Ruhe; ne. rest (N.), silence; Hw.: vgl. ahd. restī (1); Q.: AA 22; E.: s. re-s-t-a; L.: Hh 145b, AA 22

If Wodin was 'resting' one would think a form of the word 'rest' would be used. They clearly have a word for this. Lumka Makia could have been named by sailors therefore contains sailor language being luimke/lumke as a place to slow down but not rest or reside at. However I find it very hard to say either way - another of those typical OLB incongruities. (disharmonies)

Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us.

Wodin thene/the aldeste/oldest homed to lumkamakia by the Emude to astflyland by sin/his eldrum/parents t-us/house.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

rest and reside becomes a brain strain - don't think I'll go there tonight, since it has 3 etymologies. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rest

What I will declare is that the name Etruscans might come from this etymology. They called themselves Rasna, not Tyrrheni.

Not only is Tuscany a peaceful, restful, quiet area, the Etruscans are HUGE resters.

Always resting and lounging around the place....

250px-Paris_-_Louvre_-_Sarcophage.jpg

Just jesting........Tuscany is quite 'rustic'. They may have simply been 'country-folk'.

rustic (adj.) mid-15c., from Latin rusticus "of the country, rural; country-like, plain, simple, rough, coarse, awkward," from rus (genitive ruris) "open land, country" (see rural).

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Odense_River

The Odense River (Danish: Odense Å) is a river located on the island of Funen, in central Denmark.

......

Odense Å......

http://da.wikipedia....dense_Ã…

++++

EDIT:

The name Odense is derived from Odins , meaning "Odin's sanctuary" as the area was known as a sanctuary for worshippers of the Nordic god, Odin.[1]

Odense is one of Denmark's oldest cities. Archaeological excavations in the vicinity show proof of settlement for over 4,000 years since at least the Stone Age.[2][1] The earliest community was centred on the higher ground between the Odense River to the south and Naesbyhoved Lake (now dry) to the north. Nonnebakken, one of Denmark's former Viking ring fortresses, lay to the south of the river.[3] Today, Odense's Møntergården Museum has many artefacts related to the early Viking history in the Odense area.[4] The Vikings built numerous fortifications along the river banks to defend it against invaders coming in from the coast.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odense

.

Do you think Odense can be in Astflyland though? Astflyland and Denmark are quite distinctly said and Wodin whether he was lumkamakiaing or Lumka Makia is a place, was in Astflyland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

upanishad.jpg

The religiously significant word "upanishad" might very well be of Fryan ('Northwestblock') origin.

Wiki:

The Upanishads are a collection of Vedic texts which contain the earliest emergence of some of the central religious concepts of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. (...)

The Sanskrit term Upanishad translates to "sitting down near", referring to the student sitting down near the teacher while receiving esoteric knowledge.

VPPA, UPPA

op - dutch

up(on) - english

på - norse, swedish, danish

auf - german

NITHER

niður - icelandic

neer, neder - dutch

ned - danish, norse

ner - swedish

nieder - german

nether - english

SITTE - SAT

to sit (he sat on a seat) - english

zitten (hij zat op een zetel/ stoel) - dutch

sitzen (er saß auf einem Sessel/ Sitz) - german

sit (han satt på en säte/ stol) - swedish

sitte (han satt på et sete) - norse

sidde (han sad på et sæde) - danish

sitja (hann sat á sæti) - icelandic

Some Oera Linda examples of many more:

[005/03]

BY THÉRE HÉRD. VPPA HÉM ÀND HWÉR.ET WÉSA MÉI.

near the hearth, at home and wherever it may be

[013/14]

FAL THAN VPPA THAM NITHER LIK BLIXENANDE FJVR

then fall down upon them like lightning fire

[048/24]

HJA THAM THÉR SATON VPPA É.LANDA

they who sat there upon the islands

[049/04]

THÉRA THÉR IN DA HÁGE MARKA SÁTON (...) LAND.SÁTON MÁR.SATA ÀND HOLT JEFTA WOD.SÁTA

those who sat in the high marks (...) Landsáton, Mársata and Holt- or Woodsáta

[057/11]

THAT HJA.RA SELVA NITHER SETTA

that they settle down (themselves)

[070/18]

JEF WI VS IN THÉRE MINNA MACHTE NITHER SETTA

if we might settle (us) down in peace ('in the loving')

[094/29]

HJRA TÁT ÀND GÁDE WÉRON JETA VPPA STOPPENBENKE SÉTEN

her dad and spouse were still sitting upon the stepbench

Edited by gestur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remarkable.

Note the 6-spoke wheels.

Source: http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/238/

Religion of Indus valley civilization was a theme not found in any ancient accounts. Seals, images and other materials had been unearthed by various archaeologists. Scholars were unable to draw any inference about those people.

Well over 400 distinct Indus symbols (some say 600) had been found on seals, small tablets, or ceramic pots and over a dozen other materials, including a "signboard" that apparently once hung over the gate of the inner citadel of the Indus city of Dholavira. It was one of the largest and most prominent archaeological sites in India in the Kutch Desert Wildlife Sanctuary of Gujarat, India.

display-507.jpg

Banner at the North Gate of Dholavira

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CAUTION

OLB-believers are dangerous!

"Its mythologic-religious character makes the book loved by some loners, whose belief in secret conspiracies entices them to commit (suicide) attacks." (my translation)

Source: "Bedrog, bijgeloof en zelfmoord in Friesland" (Deceit, superstition and suicide in Friesland) in Eos Magazine (sept. 2011), by penny-a-liner Chris Reinewald.

I asked the scribbler for a source and if he knew an example of such an attack. He answered that he had promised his anonymous source to not reveil any details in order to protect him/her.

I found a fascinating possible piece of the puzzle.

Jensma suggested (don't recall where exactly now) that the OLB had made 'victims' (people who believed in its authenticity).

Other authors have suggested that it would be a product of dark forces.

In 1983 Jensma acted (main character) in a short film, titled "Stof tot Stilte" (he used the name Goffe Theunis).

This film can very well be seen as an allegory about the OLB.

The plot in short:

A young photographer falls in love with a mysterious, unattainable woman who was in the background of some photos he took.

He does not know that the woman was sent there on purpose by an man (fate, doom?), to make him the victim of his evil plot.

He gets obsessed with her and enters a limbo of doubt: Does she still live, is she real at all?

At the end he meets her, but she somehow dissappoints him, anyway he looses his mind and commits suicide.

The film ends with the mysterious evil man looking for a new victim.

See and decide for yourself:

[media=]

[/media]

If someone from the group of friends who made this film got obsessed with the OLB, lost his mind and/ or commited suicide, this would explain the fear around the OLB that I sense in Jensma's book (and in Friesland in general). Psychologically it is a well known mechanism to ridicule or demonise something that is feared. (Just speculating out loud.)

The filmtitle "Stof tot Stilte" is a based on the Dutch expression "stof tot nadenken", which can be translated as "food for thought" (litterally: material/ stuff to think about/ reflect on/ ponder).

In this sense, the filmtitle ('food for silence') could be interpreted as "material to be silent about", or "material to not speak about", in other words: taboo.

This could explain much.

10530873_427963200676658_6668429942806099458_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mentioned this in another thread but will bring it to this one as its more suitable.

learn (v.) Old English leornian "to get knowledge, be cultivated, study, read, think about," from Proto-Germanic *liznojan (cognates: Old Frisian lernia, Middle Dutch leeren, Dutch leren, Old High German lernen, German lernen "to learn," Gothic lais "I know"), with a base sense of "to follow or find the track," from PIE *leis- (1) "track, furrow." Related to German Gleis "track," and to Old English læst "sole of the foot" (see last (n.)). http://www.etymonlin....php?term=learn

German GLEIS = track - LAEST = sole of the foot (thing we walk with)

This now, is my opinion about the ancient word GLISAS for glass meaning amber in the context it's known to be used.

The OLB says this: because often they did nothing else than look for amber on the shore.

Thêra tham saton biâsten tha Dênemarka wrdon Juttar hêton, uthâvede hja tomet navt owers ne dêdon as barn-stên juta

They walked along the shore looking for amber - tracked along

The only jut word in the Frisian dictionary is:

jutha, juth-a, afries., sw. M. (n): Vw.: s. joth-a

jotha 1 und häufiger, jutha*, juda, joda, jude, jode, joth-a, juth-a*, jud-a, jod-a, jud-e, jod-e, afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Jude; ne. Jew;

so I'm guessing it's really based in jut. protruding.

This word is the same as jet.

jet 4, gat, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Loch, Öffnung; ne. hole (N.); Vw.: s. gru-n-d-; Hw.: vgl. an. gat, ae. geat (1), as. gat*; Q.: H, W, E, Jur; E.: germ. *gata-, *gatam, st. N. (a), Loch; vgl. idg. *gʰed-, V., Sb., scheißen, Loch, Pokorny 423; W.: nfries. gat; W.: saterl. gat; L.: Hh 53b, Rh 847a

Its hole because a jet of something creates a hole - if something juts out, it's in a hole. http://dictionary.re....com/browse/jut - see jet that connects. This is a super interesting word - I'd also say that GATE comes from it - a gate is a hole in the wall.

What I found really interesting there though is the word is the same as GEAT then GAT - imo the meaning of the name of the GEATS and possibly even the GOTHS and GOTLAND, land of the GOTS - all amber finders - JUTTERS of East Denmark - exactly where they are said to be with a name connection that makes perfect sense (as all the etymology of the OLB does to me).

(I'd challenge anyone to find the meanings of Jove and Minerva elsewhere than Frisian.)

This tells me who was at the other end of the Amber Road that led to Mycenaean Greece and Rome - even if we don't go with the OLB it's easy to see how the language could have transferred into the Mediterranean in the Bronze Age.

If we look at Gothic lais=I know - you can see the ais sound very clearly and it also mean "to follow or find the track" - so I'm also going to say this is the root for aster for Greek star.

Edited by The Puzzler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think Odense can be in Astflyland though? Astflyland and Denmark are quite distinctly said and Wodin whether he was lumkamakiaing or Lumka Makia is a place, was in Astflyland.

Yes, because we don't know exactly what the eastern border of this Astflyland was.

It could be Emden, it could be Odense, but not Van Gorp's Audinghem (?). Why not? When the Geertmanne came back after 1200 years, Jon settled in Staveren, and Wicherte went TO THE EAST to THE Emude, not to the south-west.... or, if Van Gorp is right, Staveren should be located in England...

-

Today I was solving a gigantic crossword puzzle, and it asked for a river in Friesland. What was the only possible answer? The Ee.

And that was the river (it barely diserves the name river, lol) to which mouth Lemster was located, one possible candidate for Lumka-makia/Emude. Even nearer to the mouth of this tiny river is Lemsterhoek.

Lemster is almost exactly east of Staveren.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something else, and not that much related to this thread, but I found it in Alewyn's book about the OLB.

Alewyn mentions "barbarians" at some point, and uses the standard etymology to explain the word: that the Greek nicknamed a foreign language they couldn't understand with "bar-bar", or gibberish.

But the word "barbarian" is used for savage, wild people, and not so much for people using a language we don't understand.

I was reading (and by god, trying to learn and write it - cuneiform!) a book about Assyrian Grammar, and in a wordlist I found the word "barbaru", meaning "wolf".

Now I am not saying that the word "barbarian" came from Assyrian, but that it could have come from any Semitic language(Phoenican, Ugarit, Byblos, Ebla, Hebrew), and later adopted by the Greek with whom they were in contact (trade, war, travel).

So I am saying that the word had probably nothing to do with language (bar-bar), but with behaviour (savage, like a wolf: barbaru).

+++

EDIT:

http://www.assyrianlanguages.org/akkadian/dosearch.php?searchkey=1747&language=id

.

.

Edited by Abramelin
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, because we don't know exactly what the eastern border of this Astflyland was.

It could be Emden, it could be Odense, but not Van Gorp's Audinghem (?). Why not? When the Geertmanne came back after 1200 years, Jon settled in Staveren, and Wicherte went TO THE EAST to THE Emude, not to the south-west.... or, if Van Gorp is right, Staveren should be located in England...

-

Today I was solving a gigantic crossword puzzle, and it asked for a river in Friesland. What was the only possible answer? The Ee.

And that was the river (it barely diserves the name river, lol) to which mouth Lemster was located, one possible candidate for Lumka-makia/Emude. Even nearer to the mouth of this tiny river is Lemsterhoek.

Lemster is almost exactly east of Staveren.

I'm not necessarily against the idea of that area being where Lumka Makia is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 11

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.