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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

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https://www.google.c...01.JPG;1280;853

Those wheels look vaguely like Jol Script...

Vaguely. I don't see any 6-spoked wheels and don't see anything really script-like though.

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This is a very interesting (and long in-depth) article about the Nordwestblock languages and how it just doesn't fit right, within the realms of Celtic timeline. http://rokus01.wordp...-origin-revise/

It mentions Barry Cunliffe's Book Facing The Atlantic (which I've read and recommend) and how his researches (along with DNA) are finding these inconsistencies in long-held views.

However, if Celtic expansion to the Low Countries should be traced back to Atlantic influences in the Bronze Age, then the issue of local cohabitation should be addressed as well. The Celtic blueprint conceived in coastal languages of later periods (Frisian!) might have provided a complicated mixture to start with, part of which probably only nominally Celtic.

Genetic evidence points at an abundance of YDNA R1b-P312 markers for the Celtic/Atlantic hemisphere, though unfortunately this didn’t get the picture straight north of the Rhine. Different degrees of marker differentiation into subclades might point at special circumstances in the Netherlands. At first sight ‘Celtic’ intrusions from the Isles would suggest a profusion of typical British YDNA markers like R1b-L21, but so far such results are far from convincing. The region is littered with R1b-U106 instead, a marker that typically runs high among Germanic Anglosaxons and low among Celts. This R1b-U106 marker clearly diverged from the combined Atlantic “Celtic” association under investigation, that heavily leans on the very prolific R1b-P312 sisterclade as a genetic marker. The vast majority of current YDNA results in the Low Countries simply doesn’t reveal the derived Celtic affiliation we are looking for.

The Dutch river mouth mentioned by Pliny the Elder was called Helinium in accusitivus, what would probably indicate a Latin river name Helinius, consistent with the Latin ending -us that generally applies to rivers. Normally, -ius instead of simply -us would imply a derivation of a region called Helinus. In Frisia numerous toponyms feature the hel element, what Clerinx translates into “low lands, marsh” and subsequently connects to Brythonic “marsh” or “estuary”. Other Celtic etymologies have been proposed, like “salt” – probably inspired by now obsolete ideas that involve a Hallstatt origin of Celtic. The Friso-Brythonic etymology does a much better job in addressing reminiscent Celtic features in Frisian, or the Ingvaeonic hemisphere as a whole. The implication would be that the -lin suffix might as well have been Germanic, distorted by Latin transcription issues. This intertwining of ancestral Celtic heritage and west Germanic loans and culture could be extended to the puzzling etymology of local goddess Nehalennia (also transcribed as Neihalennia), that now from a mixed local heritage easily translates to water-ghost (nikker ~IE *neig, to wash) of a region called Halennia – not unlike the latinized form Helinus deduced above. Since the description of the region delimited by Pliny between Helinium ac Flevum neatly corresponds to the historic region of Holland, I wonder if this is mere coincidence or that Holland indeed represent the ultimate indication of a lost Celtic heritage. This mixture could be symptomatic for the almost intangible potpourri that is might be implicated by the Nordwestblock or “Belgae” denomination. This may have been nothing but emerging West Germanic from a shared heritage.

This is interesting if you consider what the OLB says about Celts - that is, they derived from a split group around the Holland/Belgium border as followers of Kalta, who then developed associated cultural tendencies we know as "Celtic" - Kaltic. (water-ghost in Celtic - new and whole in Frisian - Frisians would not name her from that kind (water-ghost/nikker) of etymology but Kalta based Celts would use a language that developed into more 'spiritual/druidic/priestessy' for want of a better term.)

I particularly DO NOT subscribe to their given etymology for Nehallenia.

The confusion seen in the article could be rectified if this was considered - a Celtic group who spread from lower Holland, whose language came from Frisian and became Celticised after language transformations took place out of the continuing Frisian language realm. ie; Southern Europe, Iberia etc.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Great. I posted that a year or more ago, lol.

Anyway, this is a competing view on the Germanic languages (and also posted before):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theo_Vennemann

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What does anyone notice the same about all these 'Nekkers'?

220px-Ernst_Josephson-N%C3%A4cken.jpg

220px-DieRheint%C3%B6chter.jpg

220px-Armitage_Siren.JPG

170px-The_Siren.jpg

220px-Ulysses_and_the_Sirens_by_H.J._Draper.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekker & Siren

They are all NAKED of course.

puzzling etymology of local goddess Nehalennia (also transcribed as Neihalennia), that now from a mixed local heritage easily translates to water-ghost (nikker ~IE *neig, to wash)

The neig - to wash imo obviously comes from the concept of naked. We don't wash with our clothes on do we...?

If Nehalennia is based in Frisian it could mean naked (spirit/nekker) lowlander..? water spirit of the marshes.

However the OLB gives us new and whole and a NY prefix.

But my main point here was to show that IE * neig and the whole Nekker/Nikker thing can easily be based in Frisian 'naked' (young maiden/man swimming=nekker) - a 'skinny-dipper'.

Edited by The Puzzler

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To go even further, it could be that the word 'night' actually derives from this same concept - you have nocht (naked) in Old Irish and also Nyx as a name for the Nekker, which is also an old mythological name for night.

to be naked - "to bathe in the moonlight"

I know with crystals, they are cleansed by the moonlight - moonlight has that watery, cleansing concept about it.

Edited by The Puzzler

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Its interesting to see GENEIGT in this list - because it actually appears it has the IE stem of NEIG in it. nikker ~IE *neig, to wash)

hald (1)***, hal-d***, afries., Adj.: nhd. geneigt, gerichtet; ne. inclined; Vw.: s. nor-th-, ūt-; Hw.: s. hal-d-ia, hel-d-e (3); vgl. got. *halþs, an. hallr, ae. heald (3), ahd. hald* (1); E.: germ. *halþa-, *halþaz, Adj., geneigt; s. idg. *kel- (5), V., treiben, antreiben, Pokorny 548?; idg. *kᵘ̯el- (1), *kᵘ̯elə-, *kᵘ̯elh-, V., drehen, sich drehen, sich bewegen, wohnen, Pokorny 639; W.: nnordfries. helde; L.: Hh 37b, Rh 790b

That has me asking then: does 'hal' as 'inclined' actually have a connection to 'nek' as naked'..? And how does geneigt mean inclined...? Its reminding me of GENU for knee and the meaning of bend.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/neigen ge+neig

to bend, tilt, incline, lean over.....

SO, the root NEIG/NEIK for 'to wash' which I summise means naked - may lie in 'to tilt, lean over' - your NECK actually equals HALD

That means the NEK/NEIG root imo is the same for both naked and incline/tilt/lean over/bend.

to bow down, to curtsy - to lean down, lean over - Swedish niga = sink down

Nekkers were known to pull you under the water and drown you - sink you down.

So, naked may come from the concept of being submerged and moving by tilting or leaning (swimming) .

Edited by The Puzzler
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Great. I posted that a year or more ago, lol.

Anyway, this is a competing view on the Germanic languages (and also posted before):

http://en.wikipedia..../Theo_Vennemann

Only for completeness:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=227240&st=1965#entry4548059

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Puzz, Nehalennia (or whichever spelling you prefer) is depicted (and described in the OLB) as being anything but naked:

260px-Nehalennia.jpg

[An interesting site about this goddess:

http://freya.theladyofthelabyrinth.com/?page_id=377 ]

And you asked what we should notice about those "nekkers"... and it's not only that they are all naked, but also that these paintings/depictions are very recent, based on romantic ideas.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Nehalennia is most often depicted with her foot on a ship.

Now, playing along, I found this (in an old post of mine in this thread):

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/aak1

A "naak" is a boat, a ship. Later it became "aak".

+++

EDIT:

Even the OLB seems to hint at the original meaning of the name "Nehalennia":

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=227240&st=1185#entry4486211

Remember Min-erva/Nehalennia came over the seas in a "hulk/ulk"?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Puzz, Nehalennia (or whichever spelling you prefer) is depicted (and described in the OLB) as being anything but naked:

260px-Nehalennia.jpg

[An interesting site about this goddess:

http://freya.thelady...om/?page_id=377 ]

And you asked what we should notice about those "nekkers"... and it's not only that they are all naked, but also that these paintings/depictions are very recent, based on romantic ideas.

.

That's right, SHE'S not naked, shes not a Nekker, so the etymology for her as water-spirit as stated in that article is not Fryan based and not correct imo.

I agree they are modern depictions but the word is steeped in bend, tilt, incline and Ive checked it out for another 24 hours and can assure you this meaning is everywhere, including naked.

It can even mean die, you bend right over, fall down, literally. Bending around you do get an arc - 6 arcs make a Jul - 6 arcs make a circle, a whole. Everything based on bending, tilting, turning and completing or nearing completion of a full tilt (whole) is connected. If you start to look at the GEN part as the same as in BEJIN, it gets really interesting. Start an incline.

incline - geneigt - I got everything from journey to genesis for ya.

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Nehalennia is most often depicted with her foot on a ship.

Now, playing along, I found this (in an old post of mine in this thread):

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/aak1

A "naak" is a boat, a ship. Later it became "aak".

+++

EDIT:

Even the OLB seems to hint at the original meaning of the name "Nehalennia":

http://www.unexplain...85#entry4486211

Remember Min-erva/Nehalennia came over the seas in a "hulk/ulk"?

.

Hint? They tell us straight out - it means new and whole.

ne+hal+enia(fem.)

A naak as boat is not surprising, like a swimmer, it inclines, tilts and bends as it makes a pathway along a route.

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What adds to it all is that you find geneigt in hald: hald (1)***, hal-d***, afries., Adj.: nhd. geneigt, gerichtet; ne. inclined;

These words don't have the same root but they do have the exact same meaning.

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Nehalennia (...) is depicted (...) as being anything but naked:

If Nyhellenja was indeed another name of Minerva, as suggested in OLB, you might want to reconsider...

WLANL_-_legalizefreedom_-_Minerva.jpg

Minerva (1611) by Hendrick Goltzius

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Its interesting to see GENEIGT in this list - because it actually appears it has the IE stem of NEIG in it. nikker ~IE *neig, to wash)

That has me asking then: does 'hal' as 'inclined' actually have a connection to 'nek' as naked'..? And how does geneigt mean inclined...? Its reminding me of GENU for knee and the meaning of bend.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/neigen ge+neig

to bend, tilt, incline, lean over.....

SO, the root NEIG/NEIK for 'to wash' which I summise means naked - may lie in 'to tilt, lean over' - your NECK actually equals HALD

That means the NEK/NEIG root imo is the same for both naked and incline/tilt/lean over/bend.

to bow down, to curtsy - to lean down, lean over - Swedish niga = sink down

Nekkers were known to pull you under the water and drown you - sink you down.

So, naked may come from the concept of being submerged and moving by tilting or leaning (swimming) .

Wow, and then I think we can't skip the 'niger'-word for our black fellows. Maybe because they were wild, rude and uncivilised walking around naked all the time.

But there is a third possibilty everytime people try to say niger is not an insult but just meaning black, like we call ourselves white.

I'm thinking: slaves were in great numbers taken from Africa for serving the white people:

why can't the word 'niger' be derived from the service they delivered to the whites?

The most casual sign for obedience is making a bow, bending over: neigen!

So the niger can be the man/woman in service who bows for his masters. Then i prefer talking about black people.

Neigen in dutch is also used figuratively for having a tendency (to be inclined towards a certain habit, force).

The nekkers as natural tendencies, which can make a man drown figuratively when followed without internal control?

Maybe the reason why in many tales the nekkers are looked on as not so benevolent.

Edited by Van Gorp

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Hint? They tell us straight out - it means new and whole.

ne+hal+enia(fem.)

Ny Hellenia (New and Hel): New Moon

Maybe also a connection with Hel (incline, bending) is that Nyhellenia can be linked with the new and crescent moon.

Ny: new

Hel-ene: moon, because bending (hellend). On top the word moon (maan in dutch) is possibly connected with the verb 'manen' (to make remember, to urge, to reprimand, warn, ...).

So also the moon makes us remember and help to follow the point in time and act on it (fe agriculture and helpfull tool in time keeping and predicting eb/flood).

'Ze maant ons aan'. She helps us to remember/urges to do the right things on the right moment -> see how Ny-hellenia in OLB is described as giving new and fresh/bright advice to the people.

And how strange the manes of a horse can be explained with the same: you guide the horse with his manes, urge the horse to follow a certain route.

Even stranger (or natural mirror) is that the manes of a horse are right on his neck, that also can mean bending like the moon.

So here comes together neck-maan-moon-hellenia

And hellenia of course is with skipping the 'H' in front just the luna.

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Ny Hellenia (New and Hel): New Moon

Maybe also a connection with Hel (incline, bending) is that Nyhellenia can be linked with the new and crescent moon.

Ny: new

Hel-ene: moon, because bending (hellend). On top the word moon (maan in dutch) is possibly connected with the verb 'manen' (to make remember, to urge, to reprimand, warn, ...).

So also the moon makes us remember and help to follow the point in time and act on it (fe agriculture and helpfull tool in time keeping and predicting eb/flood).

'Ze maant ons aan'. She helps us to remember/urges to do the right things on the right moment -> see how Ny-hellenia in OLB is described as giving new and fresh/bright advice to the people.

And how strange the manes of a horse can be explained with the same: you guide the horse with his manes, urge the horse to follow a certain route.

Even stranger (or natural mirror) is that the manes of a horse are right on his neck, that also can mean bending like the moon.

So here comes together neck-maan-moon-hellenia

And hellenia of course is with skipping the 'H' in front just the luna.

Mind-bending stuff hey VG? My mind just about exploded last night going back to the PIE* roots for all these hal/hel words and their seems to be 4 or 5 PIE words, that actually seem quite explainable within this context - to all connect - to one root meaning incline (tilt, bend) - I also see the Moon as a crescent, a bend, and then also think of the nicks, notches made for ancient lunar calendars, and on it goes....lol

Interesting thoughts there on the Moon word connections that I'll look more at tonight for sure. Like a guiding moon, or light, or Lamp...

The Greek Moon goddess Selene's name would seemingly be rooted in same SEL is only a skip away from hel. (Greek and Latin col/cal/cel)

With the niger word, which didn't escape me either, then how the Nekkers were a spirit, 'water-spirit' for example, gave thought to why another term for them may be 'spooks', probably all names given by people whose ancestry had been Northern Europe into USA, without necessarily being what seems quite derogatory now.

Edited by The Puzzler

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Mannus, according to the Roman writer Tacitus, was a figure in the creation myths of the Germanic tribes. Tacitus is the only source of these myths.[1]

Tacitus wrote that Mannus was the son of Tuisto and the progenitor of the three Germanic tribes Ingaevones, Herminones and Istvaeones.[2] In discussing the German tribes Tacitus wrote:

In ancient lays, their only type of historical tradition, they celebrate Tuisto, a god brought forth from the earth. They attribute to him a son, Mannus, the source and founder of their people, and to Mannus three sons, from whose names those nearest the Ocean are called Ingvaeones, those in the middle Herminones, and the rest Istvaeones.

Mannus, born from Tuisto (Twisto) lol.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Nehalennia is most often depicted with her foot on a ship.

Now, playing along, I found this (in an old post of mine in this thread):

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/aak1

A "naak" is a boat, a ship. Later it became "aak".

+++

EDIT:

Even the OLB seems to hint at the original meaning of the name "Nehalennia":

http://www.unexplain...85#entry4486211

Remember Min-erva/Nehalennia came over the seas in a "hulk/ulk"?

.

I realised upon another read that - yes, it might be that Nyhellenia's name was distorted when placed on an altar or plaque - the priests said that she came over the sea in a 'cloud' etc - after stealing the laws and customs of the Fryans, they erect altars etc. So, the Nehallenia of the Roman age altars, plaques and what nots of her - probably have the distorted version of her, created by the priests - rather than what Nyhellenia originally stood for and represented to Fryans.

but no, in place of abusing her they went all about from the heathenish Krekaland to the Alps, proclaiming that it had pleased the Almighty God to send his clever daughter Min-erva, surnamed Nyhellenia, over the sea in a cloud to give people good counsel, and that all who listened to her should become rich and happy, and in the end governors of all the kingdoms of the earth. They erected statues to her on all their altars, they announced and sold to the simple people advice that she had never given, and related miracles that she had never performed. They cunningly made themselves masters of our laws and customs, and by craft and subtlety were able to explain and spread them around.

The Nyhellenia of the OLB means new and whole but the Nehallenia of the altars and plaques of the Roman Age Netherlands would be the distorted version imo, so her name in these instances might be related to the hulk, light ship, (ulk) 'cloud' - if that has occurred.

Edited by The Puzzler

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If Nyhellenja was indeed another name of Minerva, as suggested in OLB, you might want to reconsider...

WLANL_-_legalizefreedom_-_Minerva.jpg

Minerva (1611) by Hendrick Goltzius

A romantic painting from 1611 won't make me reconsider, lol.

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I realised upon another read that - yes, it might be that Nyhellenia's name was distorted when placed on an altar or plaque - the priests said that she came over the sea in a 'cloud' etc - after stealing the laws and customs of the Fryans, they erect altars etc. So, the Nehallenia of the Roman age altars, plaques and what nots of her - probably have the distorted version of her, created by the priests - rather than what Nyhellenia originally stood for and represented to Fryans.

but no, in place of abusing her they went all about from the heathenish Krekaland to the Alps, proclaiming that it had pleased the Almighty God to send his clever daughter Min-erva, surnamed Nyhellenia, over the sea in a cloud to give people good counsel, and that all who listened to her should become rich and happy, and in the end governors of all the kingdoms of the earth. They erected statues to her on all their altars, they announced and sold to the simple people advice that she had never given, and related miracles that she had never performed. They cunningly made themselves masters of our laws and customs, and by craft and subtlety were able to explain and spread them around.

The Nyhellenia of the OLB means new and whole but the Nehallenia of the altars and plaques of the Roman Age Netherlands would be the distorted version imo, so her name in these instances might be related to the hulk, light ship, (ulk) 'cloud' - if that has occurred.

The name "Nehalennia" has been found engraved on altar-stones spelled in several slightly different ways, but never as "Nyhellenia",

Btw, ULK doesn't mean 'cloud'. The initial H has dropped off; you can see it from the sentence the word is used in.

Nêan an stêde fon hja to bihluda gvngon hja allerwêikes, âk to tha hêinde Krêkalana til tha Alpa ut to kêthane, thaet et thene allervrste drochten hâgth hêde sin wisa toghater Min-erva, to nômth Nyhellênia êmong tha maenniska to sendane in overa sê mith-en ulk, vmbe tha manniska gode rêd to jêvane aend that allermannalik, thêr hja hêra wilde, rik aend lukich skolde wertha,

Anyway, the OLB uses a different word meaning 'cloud' couple of times.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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The name "Nehalennia" has been found engraved on altar-stones spelled in several slightly different ways, but never as "Nyhellenia",

Btw, ULK doesn't mean 'cloud'. The initial H has dropped off; you can see it from the sentence the word is used in.

Nêan an stêde fon hja to bihluda gvngon hja allerwêikes, âk to tha hêinde Krêkalana til tha Alpa ut to kêthane, thaet et thene allervrste drochten hâgth hêde sin wisa toghater Min-erva, to nômth Nyhellênia êmong tha maenniska to sendane in overa sê mith-en ulk, vmbe tha manniska gode rêd to jêvane aend that allermannalik, thêr hja hêra wilde, rik aend lukich skolde wertha,

Anyway, the OLB uses a different word meaning 'cloud' couple of times.

.

I know, 'cloud' (note I used inverted commas before too) is a terrible translation - it really could just be 'light ship' as it would be in Frisian.

I wouldn't expect to see it as Nyhellenia. The Nehallenia of the altars, plaques and Roman era is too different from the original Nyhellenia that Athena was based on but once their would have been a Nyhellenia, by Roman times, she was distorted as Nehallenia.

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huk, hu-k, afries., Pron.: Vw.: s. hwe-lik

hulk, hu-lk, afries., Pron.: Vw.: s. hwe-lik

(note there is no line over the e - but how about that, very close is wheel) 2 sounds hwel and hweel (and everyone sounds pretty much all, complete, whole to me so I'd expect a connection in these words)

hwēl 1 und häufiger, afries., N.: nhd. Rad; ne. wheel (N.); Vw.: s. -mak-er; Hw.: vgl. an. hvēl, ae. hweogl; E.: s. germ. *hwela, *hwegwula, *hwehula, Sb., Rad; idg. *kᵘ̯ekᵘ̯lo-, *kᵘ̯okᵘ̯lo-, Sb., Rad, Pokorny 639; s. idg. *kᵘ̯el- (1), *kᵘ̯elə-, *kᵘ̯elh₁-, V., drehen, sich drehen, sich bewegen, wohnen, Pokorny 639?; vgl. idg. *kel- (1), *kelə-, V., Adj., ragen, hoch, Pokorny 544?; L.: Hh 49a

hwelik 50 und häufiger, hwelk, hwek, hulk, huk, hok, hwe-lik, hwe-lk, hwe-k, hu-lk, hu-k, ho-k, afries., Pron.: nhd. welch, jeder; ne. which, everyone; ÜG.: lat. quīlibet L 1, L 2, L 17, L 24; Vw.: s. jā-, sā-; Hw.: vgl. got. ƕvileiks, an. hvīlīkr, ae. hwelc, as. hwilīk*, ahd. welīh*; Q.: R, E, H, F, W, S, B, Jur, Schw, L 1, L 2, L 17, L 24; E.: germ. *hwelīka-, *hwelīkaz, *hwilīka-, *hwilīkaz, Adj., Pron., welcher, wie beschaffen (Adj.); s. idg. *kᵘ̯o-, *kᵘ̯os (M.), *kᵘ̯e-, *kᵘ̯ā- (F.), *kᵘ̯ei-, Pron., wer, Pokorny 644; idg. *lē̆ig- (2?), Sb., Adj., Gestalt, ähnlich, gleich, Pokorny 667?; W.: nfries. welck, Pron., welch; W.: nnordfries. hock, Pron., welch; L.: Hh 49a, Rh 835a; R.: hwe-lik-er-a hand-a, hwe-lik-er-a hond-a, afries., Attr.: nhd. was für ein; ne. which; Q.: R; L.: Hh 39a, Rh 835a

hweliksā*, hwe-lik-sā*, afries., Pron.: Vw.: s. hwe-k-sā

hwelk, hwe-lk, afries., Pron.: Vw.: s. hwe-lik

hwēlmaker 1 und häufiger, hwēl-mak-er, afries., st. M. (ja): nhd. Radmacher; ne. wheelmaker; E.: s. hwēl, mak-er; L.: Hh 49a, Hh 161

hulk (n.) Old English hulc "light, fast ship" (but in Middle English a heavy, unwieldy one), probably from Old Dutch hulke and Medieval Latin hulcus, perhaps ultimately from Greek holkas "merchant ship," literally "ship that is towed," from helkein "to pull" (from PIE root *selk- "to pull, draw").

bulk (n.) mid-15c., "a heap," earlier "ship's cargo" (mid-14c.), from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse bulki "a heap; ship's cargo," thus "goods loaded loose" (perhaps literally "rolled-up load"), from Proto-Germanic *bul-, from PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, inflate, swell"

buld 7, blud, afries., N.: nhd. eine Münze (1 Schilling oder 1/16 Mark); ne. coin (N.), shilling; Hw.: vgl. plattd. bult, bulten; Q.: R, H; W.: saterl. bult; L.: Hh 13a, Rh 673a

bulder***, bul-d-er***, afries., Sb.: nhd. Polter; Hw.: s. bulder-slêk; E.: germ. *buljan?, sw. V., dröhnen; idg. ?

bulderslêk 2, bul-d-er-slêk, afries., st. M. (a?): nhd. Polterschlag, lauter Schlag; ne. blow (N.);

clouds blow - now why would this get translated into English as clouds unless it made sense, in English..?

So, maybe ULK is not actually HULK but BULK - she came over as "ship's cargo" that blew in "on a cloud"...clouds blow - she came on an ULK... on a blow -- cloud? or a ship/ships cargo...?

Edited by The Puzzler

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The name "Nehalennia" has been found engraved on altar-stones spelled in several slightly different ways, but never as "Nyhellenia",

Btw, ULK doesn't mean 'cloud'. The initial H has dropped off; you can see it from the sentence the word is used in.

Nêan an stêde fon hja to bihluda gvngon hja allerwêikes, âk to tha hêinde Krêkalana til tha Alpa ut to kêthane, thaet et thene allervrste drochten hâgth hêde sin wisa toghater Min-erva, to nômth Nyhellênia êmong tha maenniska to sendane in overa sê mith-en ulk, vmbe tha manniska gode rêd to jêvane aend that allermannalik, thêr hja hêra wilde, rik aend lukich skolde wertha,

Anyway, the OLB uses a different word meaning 'cloud' couple of times.

.

Well, maybe 'cloud' is actually the right translation and not so terrible after all. Because they have it as English translation is what makes me think it's correct, it's some known Old English word for cloud, so Sandbach has translated it as such, for sure. Since the OLB has several spellings for individual words, generally as time goes on, it is not that surprising to see it spelt in various forms, from ulk to wolka.

Not that she actually came in a cloud, but the priests were able to create this impression from the ability to use that context from the same word, imo and what the paragraph is saying. root:blow

Thâ to tha lesta spraek tongar ut-a wolka aend blixen schrêf an thaet loftrvm, wâk.

then at length thunder burst from the clouds, and the lightning wrote upon the firmament “Watch!”

Hêl thene sümer was svnne aeftere wolkum skolen, as wilde hja irtha navt ne sja.

During the whole summer the sun had been hid behind the clouds, as if unwilling to look upon the earth.

wolken 6, wulken, wolk-en, wulk-en, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Wolke; ne. cloud (N.); Hw.: vgl. an. wolcen, as. wolkan*, ahd. wolkan*; Q.: S, E, W; E.: germ. *wulkana-, *wulkanaz, st. M. (a), Wolke; germ. *wulkana-, *wulkanam, st. N. (a), Wolke; vgl. idg. *u̯elk- (2), *u̯elg-, Adj., feucht, nass, Pokorny 1145; W.: nfries. wolcke; W.: saterl. wolce; L.: Hh 132b, Rh 1158a

Edited by The Puzzler

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