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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

Dr. J.H. Halbertsma wrote the original text.

That is your theory, not fact.

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This is not true.

What is not true?

I have a copy of the letter at home.

Will check next week.

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"Klankleer en Vormleer in het OLB" (phonology and morphology in the OLB) masters thesis (2000) by V. vd Bossche (Univ. Leuven)

Fragment p.5, with translation:

"... in het midden van de twintigste eeuw [werd] het papier, de inkt en de binding onderzocht. Het resultaat van dit onderzoek was eensluidend: Thet Oera Linda Boek kon geen vervalsing zijn. Toch vallen de voorstanders van de echtheid na dit onderzoek stil. In de tweede helft van de twintigste eeuw zijn enkel nog stemmen te horen die de onechtheid van het boek onderstrepen."

"... in the mid-20th century, paper, ink and binding were investigated. The result of this research was unambiguous: The OLB could not be a forgery. Yet the proponents of its authenticity stay silent after this. In the 2nd half of the 20th century only voices are heard that claim it's a hoax."

Unfortunately, vd Bossche does not give sources for this mid-20th C. investigation.

I don't know what he was referring to.

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"Klankleer en Vormleer in het OLB" (phonology and morphology in the OLB) masters thesis (2000) by V. vd Bossche (Univ. Leuven)

Fragment p.5, with translation:

"... in het midden van de twintigste eeuw [werd] het papier, de inkt en de binding onderzocht. Het resultaat van dit onderzoek was eensluidend: Thet Oera Linda Boek kon geen vervalsing zijn. Toch vallen de voorstanders van de echtheid na dit onderzoek stil. In de tweede helft van de twintigste eeuw zijn enkel nog stemmen te horen die de onechtheid van het boek onderstrepen."

"... in the mid-20th century, paper, ink and binding were investigated. The result of this research was unambiguous: The OLB could not be a forgery. Yet the proponents of its authenticity stay silent after this. In the 2nd half of the 20th century only voices are heard that claim it's a hoax."

Unfortunately, vd Bossche does not give sources for this mid-20th C. investigation.

I don't know what he was referring to.

Here you find a citation:

http://www.nederlandsetaalkunde.ugent.be/file/9

I have contacted v.d. Bossche by mail to find out about his article.

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Posted (edited)

Abe today on Historum (thread closed):

"Can we go back to the OLB?"

Sure.

So, since we are all genuinely interested in the OLB, let's unite forces and pose some relevant research questions that we can focus on.

For example:

1) AUTHENTICITY

Is there any hard evidence against OLB's authenticity?

2) IDEOLOGY

What ideas as described in OLB can be 'dangerous' or questionable, and what ideas can be relevant and inspiring in our time?

3) SCRIPT & LANGUAGE

The letters U and V seem to have been used at random. Yet there are words with both U and V and some words seem to have been consequently spelled with one of the two. Can we find out if they represented a different sound?

U can be as in the English "puck" and Dutch "druk", or as in the Dutch "muur" and German fühl, or as in the German "Schule" and Eglish "you", or ...?

Edited by Otharus

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Posted (edited)

1. Not unless the paper can be shown to be modern unquestionably imo.

2. That requires more thought before I answer.

3. Yes, it's an odd one, I've been thinking about that one since I thought svn was really sven, in Swedish, young warrior, rather than son, but that was a while back...

Edited by The Puzzler

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If I look to other words in similar vein we get Suebi, which may be a form of sve sound - like sve could become sue even, it could be that V is being used in a 'ue' situation and V is also being used for v - ue; svn = suen - ue could possibly go to u or o = son or sun from svn - if the v in that case s being used for a ve that equates to ue - that became o or u in it's word use.

It's possibly nothing but might help you find something else in it. Swain, which sounds somewhat like suen, came from sven.

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For whom it may be interesting (maybe Otharus, cuz I saw you have allready some more elaborate work posted on the word ‘Bal’ and derivatives in OLB and elsewhere (like Baltic))

Schrieckius (beginning 1600’s) declares latin Balticum bears the meaning of Bfaltyck (Valdijk).

Some may think, ridiculous etymology :-)

But after some reflection we can relate one and another (remember V-B interchange like in V(b)amos, V(b)alencia, …):

'Bal' as circumstanced as ‘not so good’ we have also ‘vaal’. Vaal is Bfale -> pale.

Val like in Valley is also low (see to fall).

So all toghether connected with bad, low, platvloers, laag bij de grond, bleekskes, niet hoogstaand.

A ‘valdijk’ is a dike threathened to fall.

But besides the ‘valdijk’ we have also on several places the ‘koedijk’.

I don’t know if previously mentionned allready in connection, but could these two be connected etymologically?

Reasons of this possibility:

  • Koe coming from Kwa(de), we say for a worn-off pants ‘min kooi broek’, ‘my bad pants’
  • ‘Kwa’dijk as related to ‘Bal’dijk as related to ‘Val’dijk
    • See also familyname Kwadijk
    • Variantes de ce patronyme : KWADIIJK | KWADIJK | QUADIJK

    [*]By the last one you can think of Cadik (Cadiz) where the Dike is broken

    [*]Broken is ‘Kaduk’ -> Koedijk -> Valdijk -> Baldijk -> Baltic

Wiki says for Codanus Sinus: “The origin of the name is obscure.” As with many Latin names.

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Very interesting VG, it makes sense.

Val => Dutch verb "falen" (to fail) => German noun "fehler" (mistake)

North-Holland has two villages Kwadijk and Koedijk.

One would initially associate the latter with "koe" ="cow", but I agree it could come from KVA = KV =KU

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1. Not unless the paper can be shown to be modern unquestionably imo.

If the paper would be more modern than from the 13th century, one could still wonder if someone copied it after Hidde, without adding a letter.

The current paper research group is only comparing with western 19th century techniques, because they have started from the assumption that OLB is a hoax (which is unforgivably stupid IMO). Yet we know that - for example in China - high quality paper was made, long before the 13th century.

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How does one suppose the teenage boy who was from the Mediterranean Sea area end up at Stonehenge c.1550BC?

More recently two major new theories have been proposed. Professor Geoffrey Wainwright OBE, FSA, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Professor Timothy Darvill, OBE of Bournemouth University have suggested that Stonehenge was a place of healing – the primeval equivalent of Lourdes.[18] They argue that this accounts for the high number of burials in the area and for the evidence of trauma deformity in some of the graves. However they do concede that the site was probably multifunctional and used for ancestor worship as well.[19] Isotope analysis indicates that some of the buried individuals were from other regions. A teenage boy buried approximately 1550 BC was raised near the Mediterranean Sea; a metal worker from 2300 BC dubbed the "Amesbury Archer" grew up near the alpine foothills of Germany; and the "Boscombe Bowmen" probably arrived from Wales or Brittany, France

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

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How does one suppose the teenage boy who was from the Mediterranean Sea area end up at Stonehenge c.1550BC?

More recently two major new theories have been proposed. Professor Geoffrey Wainwright OBE, FSA, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Professor Timothy Darvill, OBE of Bournemouth University have suggested that Stonehenge was a place of healing – the primeval equivalent of Lourdes.[18] They argue that this accounts for the high number of burials in the area and for the evidence of trauma deformity in some of the graves. However they do concede that the site was probably multifunctional and used for ancestor worship as well.[19] Isotope analysis indicates that some of the buried individuals were from other regions. A teenage boy buried approximately 1550 BC was raised near the Mediterranean Sea; a metal worker from 2300 BC dubbed the "Amesbury Archer" grew up near the alpine foothills of Germany; and the "Boscombe Bowmen" probably arrived from Wales or Brittany, France

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Stonehenge

People came from all over Europe to visit Stonehenge:

The charcoal fragments also add haunting new evidence to the Stonehenge story. Darvill and Wainwright revealed yesterday, at the Society of Antiquaries in London, that the earliest has been dated to 7,000BC, and the most recent to medieval times, suggesting that the site was already important 4,000 years before the oldest stone circle, and continued to draw visitors for centuries after it was believed to have been abandoned.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=179840&st=180#entry3332462

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Posted (edited)

People came from all over Europe to visit Stonehenge:

The charcoal fragments also add haunting new evidence to the Stonehenge story. Darvill and Wainwright revealed yesterday, at the Society of Antiquaries in London, that the earliest has been dated to 7,000BC, and the most recent to medieval times, suggesting that the site was already important 4,000 years before the oldest stone circle, and continued to draw visitors for centuries after it was believed to have been abandoned.

http://www.unexplain...80#entry3332462

And that's my point. The mythology of Britain and Northern Europe could have easily embedded into Mediterranean Culture, even at 1550BC.

Wall remarks that "It is highly significant that no lunar calendar other than the Coligny system, anywhere in the world or at any time in history, began its months at the first quarter moon- except the one embodied in the stones and holes of Stonehenge" (32). In the first century B.C., the historian Diodorus Siculus remarked that in the regions beyond the lands of the Gauls, there lies an island where the moon god visits every nineteen years, "the period in which the return of the stars to the same place in the heavens is accomplished; and for this reason the nineteen year period is called by the Greeks 'the year of Meton.' " Here, states Siculus, is a "notable temple which is spherical in shape" (quoted in Wall 32).

http://www.themystica.com/mystica/articles/s/stonehenge_and_the_sequani_calendar.html

Edited by The Puzzler

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I remembered "The Archer" whose skeleton and burial gifts proved that there was even contact between Europe and Britain at an earlier time:

The Amesbury Archer is an early Bronze Age man whose grave was discovered during excavations at the site of a new housing development in Amesbury near Stonehenge. The grave was uncovered in May 2002, and the man is believed to date from about 2300 BC. He is nicknamed the "archer" because of the many arrowheads that were among the artefacts buried with him.

(...)

However his grave is of particular importance because of its connections with Continental Europe and early copper smelting technology. He is believed to have been one of the earliest metalworkers in Britain and his discovery supports interpreters who claim that the diffusion of Beaker Culture pottery was the result of population movement, rather than just the widespread adoption of an artefact 'package'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amesbury_Archer

A man dubbed the "King of Stonehenge" had probably travelled from the Alps to settle in Britain more than four millennia ago, revealing that an extensive European trade network existed in the Early Bronze Age, archaeologists said yesterday.

Tests on the teeth of the man, whose rich grave near Stonehenge amazed archaeologists last year, show he was originally from an Alpine region, probably Switzerland.

The media dubbed him "The King of Stonehenge", however, the presence of 16 flint arrowheads and two sandstone wristguards led archaeologists to call him "The Amesbury Archer".

(...)

The knives came from Spain and France. However, a study of oxygen isotopes in his teeth suggests that he came from a colder Alpine region.

The archer was an example of the spread of the Beaker culture from the continent, marked by a new style of pottery, the use of barbed flat arrow heads, copper knives and small gold ornaments.

(...)

Also found at the site was a second skeleton of a younger man, aged 20 to 25. Bone analysis showed he and the archer were related and it is likely that they were father and son.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1421680/The-King-of-Stonehenge-was-archer-from-Alps.html

Dr Andrew Fitzpatrick, of Wessex Archaeology, said: “This was a time of great change in Britain – the first metals were being brought here from abroad and great monuments such as Stonehenge were being built.

“We have long suspected that it was people from the continent of Europe who initiated the trade that first brought copper and gold to Britain, and the Archer is the first discovery to confirm this.

http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/projects/amesbury/archer_finds.html

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But now Imagine that for instance an "Ötzi the Iceman" came from Britain...

As far as I know, no skeletal remains from Europe ever showed people from ancient Britain ended up in Greece.

The only thing the remains of 'the Archer' tell us is that this man was born and spent his childhood near the Alps, but grew up in Britain.

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Posted (edited)

Just an offnote, I recall Otharus wondering about nocht - being night and nuts and couldn't help but think of it when I saw Nut, as night...

300px-Goddess_nut.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nut_(goddess)

Edited by The Puzzler

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Otharus, ik heb contact gehad met Vincent van den Bossche. Hij is inderdaad de auteur. Zijn thesis is beschikbaar bij de K.U. Leuven, Centrale Bibliotheek. Promotor is Prof. Joop van den Bosch.

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Otharus, ik heb contact gehad met Vincent van den Bossche. [...] Zijn thesis is beschikbaar bij de K.U. Leuven, Centrale Bibliotheek. [...]

Thank you, Menno.

Yes, I saw it and copied fragments there.

He posted on the other forum.

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The Finda, a Mongolian people according to the OLB, orginated near the Himalayas (by their own words what the OLB tells us about them; the Ald Land, the Old Land).

The Exterminated & Subjugated Races : Blacks (`Dasyus' &

`Sudras'), Semites (`Panis') and Mongoloids (`Nagas')

(...)

The Mongoloids are also mentioned by the Sanskrit poets. In Sanskrit they are

referred to as Yakshas, in Pali as Yakkos & in Chinese as Yueh-Chih [ 1800,p.45

]. These yellow races descended from the Himalayas and occupied much of the

Ganges valley. Being natives of higher regions they considerd themselves to be

superior to the inhabitants of the plains, and assumed the name of daivaputra of

the sons of gods' [ 1800,p.45 ]. They spread over the whole of Bengal, and

emigrated thence by sea to southern Indian and Ceylon.

http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/23515725/1004649425/name/Aryan+Invasion.pdf

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The Finda, a Mongolian people according to the OLB, orginated near the Himalayas (by their own words what the OLB tells us about them; the Ald Land, the Old Land).

The Exterminated & Subjugated Races : Blacks (`Dasyus' &

`Sudras'), Semites (`Panis') and Mongoloids (`Nagas')

(...)

The Mongoloids are also mentioned by the Sanskrit poets. In Sanskrit they are

referred to as Yakshas, in Pali as Yakkos & in Chinese as Yueh-Chih [ 1800,p.45

]. These yellow races descended from the Himalayas and occupied much of the

Ganges valley. Being natives of higher regions they considerd themselves to be

superior to the inhabitants of the plains, and assumed the name of daivaputra of

the sons of gods' [ 1800,p.45 ]. They spread over the whole of Bengal, and

emigrated thence by sea to southern Indian and Ceylon.

http://xa.yimg.com/k...an Invasion.pdf

I should have added a passage from the OLB:

Punjab, that is five rivers, and by which we travel, is a river of extraordinary beauty, and is called Five Rivers, because four other streams flow into the sea by its mouth. Far away to the eastward is another large river, the Holy or Sacred Ganges. Between these two rivers is the land of the Hindoos. Both rivers run from the high mountains to the plains. The mountains in which their sources lie are so high that they reach the heavens and therefore these mountains are called Himellaia. Among the Hindoos and others out of these countries there are people who meet together secretly. They believe that they are pure children of Finda, and that Finda was born in the Himellaia mountains, whence she went with her children to the lowlands. Some of them believe that she, with her children, floated down upon the foam of the Ganges, and that that is the reason why the river is called the Sacred Ganges.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bx

+++++

EDIT:

(...) and that that is the reason why the river is called the Sacred Ganges. But the priests, who came from another country, traced out these people and had them burnt, so that they do not dare to declare openly their creed. In this country all the priests are fat and rich. In their churches there are all kinds of monstrous images, many of them of gold.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bx

Remnants of civilization in the greater Bengal region date back four thousand years, when the region was settled by Dravidian, Tibeto-Burman, and Austro-Asiatic peoples. The exact origin of the word "Bangla" or "Bengal" is not known, though it is believed to be derived from Bang, the Dravidian-speaking tribe that settled in the area around the year 1000 BCE.

Medieval European geographers located paradise at the mouth of the Ganges and although this was overhopeful, Bengal was probably the wealthiest part of the subcontinent until the 16th century. The area's early history featured a succession of Hindu empires, internal squabbling, and a tussle between Hinduism and Buddhism for dominance.

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Bangladesh

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Gangaridai

So, would that mean that these Tibeto-Burman and Austro-Asiatic peoples were the OLB Finda?

And that the priests "who came from another country" were the Dravidians?

And.....was the mouth of the Ganges (or an area nearby) the OLB Aldland?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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New Stone Age civilisation, showing connection with that of Bihar, Orissa and Asam existed in Bangla around 3000 to 1500 BC.

Then suddenly a metal processing civilization appears. Archaeology has not been able to find the missing link from stone tools to metal tools use. This might suggest the influx of a new people into the region and maybe this goes hand in hand with the legends. The Indus civilization ended around 1800 BCE and there is a marked change in Bangla around this time...this ties in with the story of the Bong and Al peoples. Recently an ancient city has been discovered in West Bangla at Chandraketugarh near Berachampa, in North 24 Pargana. The city is presumed to be of King Chandraketu from the Gupta era (4th to 6th century AD) but will await carbon 14 tests.

==

We can assume cities existed in ancient Bangla, however, not many ruins dating back in or before the first millennium BC have been located. Certainly some cities like Pundra are refered to in ancient Aryan texts before there was much contact between the Aryans and the Bangales. Were the ruins such as ChandraketuGarh (Gaur) built upon older cities of the past?

http://mukto-mona.net/new_site/mukto-mona/bengali_heritage/bengal_history.htm

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I have said many times in part 1 of this thread that the OLB Aldland/Atland was located in Asia, based on the description of the Finda people and that they lived very far away in their Aldland.

I also said that the OLB story about "Inka" - who said sayonara to Nef Tunis when the latter was about to enter the Med, and then went west to find any remnants of Aldland - was nothing but an adapation of Columbus sailing west across the Atlantic to find a shorter route to Kathay.China/Asia.

Then, that Aldland was the Old Land, Paradise or Eden.

Well, look again where people during medieval times thought Eden was located and what Columbus really set out to find:

Early Mapping of Southeast Asia - Thomas Suarez / 1999

http://books.google.nl/books?id=ZG7ZMAbv_jAC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=Medieval+European+geographers+located+paradise+at+the+mouth+of+the+Ganges&source=bl&ots=x7jgs6OM2l&sig=BWAjRUH2DRZc6xqZOT184xZlT9s&hl=nl&sa=X&ei=0c0kULO8Nqqx0AX7soGoCg&ved=0CFwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=paradise&f=false

Paradise_medieval.gif

Paradise_Columbus.gif

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Is there a connection between South-East Asia and the OLB/Cornelis Over de Linden/Enkhuizen?

I think so.

First:

Enkhuizen was an important harbor for the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) and the company had large warehouses in Enkhuizen, and huge ships entered and left the harbor. Enkhuizen was also one of the largest shareholders of the VOC.

http://en.wikipedia....t_India_Company

http://en.wikipedia....tch_East_Indies

http://kunst-en-cult...er-almanak.html

Second:

A book in CodL's library:

35. John v. Smit, Beschrijving van Indie Ao 1638.

(India/ East Indies Company)

http://oeralinda.blo...of-bio-his.html

Third:

(IV-6) Cornelis Jansz OVER DE LINDEN I, son of (III-3), born 11-1-1811 Enkhuizen, died 22-2-1874 Den Helder, naval timberman, shipbuilder, worked for Royal Navy in Den Helder;

(V-7) Cornelis OVER DE LINDEN II, son of (IV-6), born 5-10-1833 Amsterdam, teacher, left to the Dutch Indies in 1853, where he died in 1868.

http://rodinbook.nl/...schiedenis.html

Fourth (maybe a bit long and complicated, but bear with me please) :

Where does the name "Finda" in the OLB come from, what does it mean? We have all discussed several possible meanings, and they were "(to) find", "fiend" and the like. Also a shift from Hindu > PHindu > Findu > Finda. However, the OLB mentions the "Hindoos" as different from the Finda.

From the OLB:

Sin forme nôm wêre Jes-us, thach tha prestera thêr-im sêralik haeton hêton him Fo thaet is falx, thaet folk hête him Kris-en thaet is herder, aend sin Fryaske frjund hêta him Bûda, vmbe that hi in sin hâvad en skaet fon wisdom hêde aend in sin hirt en skaet fon ljavde.

His first name was Jes-us, but the priests, who hated him, called him Fo, that is, false; the people called him Kris-en, that is, shepherd; and his Frisian friend called him Buda, because he had in his head a treasure of wisdom, and in his heart a treasure of love.

http://oeralinda.blo...ection -1806 AD

Here is a quote from Volney's book ("Les Ruines", a book in Cornelis Over de Linden's library) :

XIII. Christianity, or the Allegorical Worship of the Sun,

under the cabalistical names of Chrish-en, or Christ, and

Ye-sus or Jesus.

"Finally, these traditions went so far as to mention even his astrological and mythological names, and inform us that he was called sometimes Chris, that is to say, preserver,149 {p.160} from that, ye Indians, you have made your god Chrish-en or Chrish-na; and, ye Greek and Western Christians, your Chris-tos, son of Mary, is the same; sometimes he is called Yes, by the union of three letters, which by their numerical value form the number 1,608, one of the solar periods.150 And this, Europeans, is the name which, with the Latin termination, is become your Yes-us or Jesus, the ancient and cabalistic name attributed to young Bacchus, the clandestine son (nocturnal) of the Virgin Minerva, who, in the history of his whole life, and even of his death, brings to mind the history of the god of the Christians, that is, of the star of day, of which they are each of them the emblems."

http://oeralinda.blo...ection -1806 AD

So, does the OLB "Kris-en" indeed mean "herder" or "shepherd"? I can't say, but Krishna's alternative name does...

Govinda and Gopāla are names of Krishna, referring to his youthful occupation as a cowherd.

Both names translate to "cowherd". Sanskrit go means "cow"; pāla and vinda form tatpurusha compounds, literally translating to "finder of cows" and "protector of cows", respectively.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Govinda

Kris-en, Krishna: "cow-herder" or "cow-finder".... Go-Vinda.

What's also nice is that in Indonesia "Govinda" is spelled as "Gofinda" and still is both a first name as well as a family name in Indonesia.

And did the Dutch have a reason to not like these 'Go-Findas' much? Well, there was of course lot of resistence in the Dutch Indies against the Dutch occupation, and lots of battles were fought.

So what we have now:

- CodL was born in Enkhuizen;

- Enkhuizen was an important harbor for the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC);

- CodL's son left in 1853 for the Dutch East Indies and died there;

- Govinda , cowherd/cow-finder. was an alternative name for Krishna, or Volney's Chris-en, and of course the OLB Kris-en;

- Govinda is spelled like Gofinda in Indonesia and is a first name (males) and a family name in Indonesia.

The only problem for now is that the Finda were depicted in the OLB as enemies of the Fryans, while Kris-en/Krshna (= Govinda/Gofinda) is the altermative name for the much respected OLB Jes-us.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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About that Minoan ship with Minoan artefacts (and even a Minoan seal !) :

=

Linear Inscriptions in Germany

German anthropologist and cultural historian Hans Peter Duerr states that the Minoans visited the British Isles, presumably for the tin in Cornwall. From Cornwall, the North Friesian coast, a rich source of amber, is not much farther. Since its inundation in 1362, the “lost city” of Rungholt, on the Friesian island, Sudfall, has been a rich source of archaeological information. Under the bronze-aged peat layer were found pithoi, such as those carried aboard Minoan/Mycenaean ships during the 14th and 13th centuries BCE. Moreover, Duerr, while visiting the Rungholt site in 1994, found in the mud some amber artefacts[1] with Lin A/B inscriptions [2].

1.Interview: Rungholt. Geo Magazine. 22 Nov 2005. Ret. on 10 Apr 2012. <geo.de>.

2.Bernstein [brownstone]. Ret. on 17 Dec 2012. <kranznet.indi.de>.

RU Zg 1*

PA3-NWA-TI (03.48.37)

PA.NA.TU (KH 7)

KU-PA3-NU-WE-TO (81-03-55-75-05) ► (KN As 1517)**

KU.PA3.NA.TU (81. 56.06. 69) ► (HT 47)

KU.PA3.NU (81. 56.55) ► (HT 1)

Thus far, there is no satisfactory translation. However, working backward from LinB demonstrates possible concordances in both LinA and LinB. Nevertheless, at least one element in PA.NWA.TI is consistent with Japanese. A search for /nwa/, with pattern anywhere, yields at least 100 results. If attested as LinA, this would be the second instance of /nwa/ (see also SY Za 4). Nevertheless, I’m inclined to believe that PA3-NWA-TI belongs to LinB. Here, the value of PA3 may mirror /fu/as /pha/ or /phu/. A further validation for PA3.NWA.TI as Linear B is found in a similar name: TI-NWA-TI. This is to suggest not that the words are the same but that they follow the same morphological structure.

*****

RU Zg 2* (sides A and b )

?.MA?.KO (?.80?.70)

*****

* Assigning RU (Rungholt); Zg (stone object)

**Linear B transcription

[iMAGES OF THE SEAL]

http://kanashi.net/2...-mediterranean/

============

For those who can read German, here is his book:

Rungholt: Die Suche nach einer versunkenen Stadt - Hans Peter Duerr

http://www.amazon.de...t/dp/3458172742

============

But other scientists remain skeptical about his conclusions:

http://www.ndr.de/ge...ungholt101.html

.

Edited by Abramelin

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