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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

My point was that if all of Europe was in turmoil around 1200 BCE, why does he OLB not mention that period, not one single word.

I'll tell you why: those who created the OLB in the 19th century didn't know anything about it.

I think so. They knew from Tacitus and other Roman and Greek historians and writers what peoples were on the move in the 1st millennium, but had no reports about the Celtic era or earlier. The relied mainly on the Bible.

Edited by Knul

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There is no gap, Ulysses is mentioned, and his story is placed at the time of these upheavals.

But these upheavals which got people all over Europe on the move are not even as much as hinted at in the OLB.

.

The gap is between 1200BC to 600BC, from the end of Ulysses passage where the upheaval at (Suez) canal at 1200BC but the next entry is 600 years later. It may be why there is such a long gap in the entries even, because of the upheavals nothing was written in this time.

There would be no need to write something in 600BC that occurred in 1200BC.

And the c. 1200BC entry, nothing might have happened much at the time of writing, so wasn't included. (Except the upheaval as they went through the canal).

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The gap is between 1200BC to 600BC, from the end of Ulysses passage where the upheaval at (Suez) canal at 1200BC but the next entry is 600 years later. It may be why there is such a long gap in the entries even, because of the upheavals nothing was written in this time.

There would be no need to write something in 600BC that occurred in 1200BC.

And the c. 1200BC entry, nothing might have happened much at the time of writing, so wasn't included. (Except the upheaval as they went through the canal).

If you read that long quote of mine (from a website) a page or so back, you will know that Troy, Ulysses and the Sea peoples (and many peoples on the move within Europe, whole coutries depopulated, signs of massive floodings in Europe) happened around 1200 BC, and that all that was caused by some catastrophical event, some even suggest an impact or multiple impacts of comets (which would make Jürgen Spanuth very happy, btw).

So I am not talking about a gap between 1200 and 600 BCE, I am talking about the episode in the OLB about Ulysses or a decade before his arrival.

The OLB talks in detail about what was supposed to have happened around 2200 BCE - which was also written down in 600 BCE -, but not a word about what they now know really happened around 1200 BCE.

And maybe I'm mistaken, but was the upheaval at the Suez canal according to the OLB not 300 years or so earlier?

+++

EDIT:

It was actually 400 years earlier (Geertmen, Punjab).

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I have been reading Fomenko over the holiday, out of interest , to try to understand their theory.

He seems to think the country and name Russians , came from Rus-Scans , and talks about Frisians and Phrygians as if they are one and the same, without explanation as if " well sure , doesn't everyone know that "

So far i am on book 2, and am looking for anything which might tie in with OBL.

but their theory about the Trojan war , the Gothic war , and the Tarquinian war , all being the same event , by different historians , and given different dates by Scaligeri and Petavius is blowing my mind , trying to keep up .

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sorry... duplicate post

Edited by NO-ID-EA

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Yep , i am just interested to at least understand what their theory entails ...... they are a group of noted mathematicians after all.

having read some velikovsky , isaac Newtons amended chronology , Peter James, David Rohl, etc.......there could be something in it , why did caesar feel the need to change chron to AD1 , and from what, and then for it to change again in 1582.with a possible gain of 300 ghoste years

with Hebrews, Syriac , egyptian , Sumarians all having different calculation it is probably worth keeping an open mind.............. but subject for a whole other thread.

I only mentioned it to say about Rus-scans and Phrygians with poss connectons to OLB....Askar etc

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Well No, read the Wiki page I linked.to: it appears that what Fomenko accuses historians of, he is doing himself. And his statistical analyses are not that great.

But what is the relation with the OLB?

The MS does place certain events at about the same time as in official history, or many times ages earlier. But certainly not ages later.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Yep , i am just interested to at least understand what their theory entails ...... they are a group of noted mathematicians after all.

having read some velikovsky , isaac Newtons amended chronology , Peter James, David Rohl, etc.......there could be something in it , why did caesar feel the need to change chron to AD1 , and from what, and then for it to change again in 1582.with a possible gain of 300 ghoste years

with Hebrews, Syriac , egyptian , Sumarians all having different calculation it is probably worth keeping an open mind.............. but subject for a whole other thread.

I only mentioned it to say about Rus-scans and Phrygians with poss connectons to OLB....Askar etc

Great ID-EA :-)

Alongside 'deplacements'/doublures in time, there are also abundant deplacements/doublures in location.

Can indeed be puzzling.

History as we are told (WIKI references/myths we put OLB against) can be more fairy tale than OLB :-)

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Great ID-EA :-)

Alongside 'deplacements'/doublures in time, there are also abundant deplacements/doublures in location.

Can indeed be puzzling.

History as we are told (WIKI references/myths we put OLB against) can be more fairy tale than OLB :-)

And that's why it is always a good thing to check the references on a Wiki page before you post a link to that page.

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When Hidde said in the OLB " writen at Liudwert in the 3449th year after Atland was submerged.....that is according to the christian reckoning the year 1256 "

what dating system do we think he was using ?, from creation presumably , but Hebrew , or Byzantine or Persian were you in the north over-run by a mongul/turk invasion , did they use a sumerian dating system , it would not be the Julian calendar , and the gregorian did not start till the 1500's , and he is not using reign lengths.

so what would a 13th century fris be using at that time ?

that gave a 2193 BC reading of Atland sinking , is there a way we can backtrack , and know if the sinking of Atland is the biblical flood ?

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The OLB mentions years and 12 months a year with their old Frisian names, and weeks and days.

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If you read that long quote of mine (from a website) a page or so back, you will know that Troy, Ulysses and the Sea peoples (and many peoples on the move within Europe, whole coutries depopulated, signs of massive floodings in Europe) happened around 1200 BC, and that all that was caused by some catastrophical event, some even suggest an impact or multiple impacts of comets (which would make Jürgen Spanuth very happy, btw).

So I am not talking about a gap between 1200 and 600 BCE, I am talking about the episode in the OLB about Ulysses or a decade before his arrival.

The OLB talks in detail about what was supposed to have happened around 2200 BCE - which was also written down in 600 BCE -, but not a word about what they now know really happened around 1200 BCE.

And maybe I'm mistaken, but was the upheaval at the Suez canal according to the OLB not 300 years or so earlier?

+++

EDIT:

It was actually 400 years earlier (Geertmen, Punjab).

.

Society for Interdisciplinary Studies

The oldest and most up to date society for catastrophist information and research

Proceedings of the Second SIS Cambridge Conference

'Natural Catastrophes During Bronze Age Civilisations:

Archaeological, geological, astronomical and cultural perspectives'.

A conference at Fitzwilliam College. Cambridge. 11th-13th July 1997

Organised by The Society for Interdisciplinary Studies.

The next group of papers is concerned with events which are slightly more recent, occurring around the time certain Late Bronze Age cultures came to an end. Firstly, Amos Nur argues that large earthquakes are likely to have contributed to the physical and political collapse of Late Bronze Age civilisations around the eastern Mediterranean. It is known that, every few centuries, massive earthquakes occur in bursts that sweep across about 1000 km of the eastern Mediterranean over a time-scale of approximately 50 years. In Nur's scenario, the burst at the end of the Late Bronze Age probably began between 1225-1175 BC, and made urban centres vulnerable to opportunist military attacks.

Then, Lars Franzén and Thomas Larsson present evidence from sites in Tunisia and Sweden showing that a major atmospheric cooling event, accompanied by excessive precipitation, which led to flooding, occurred around 1000 BC. Other sources indicate that the event was sudden and widespread, and the finding of small glassy spherules points to a possible impact origin. Franzén and Larsson suggest that an asteroid or comet of diameter in the range 0.5-5 km may have landed in the eastern Atlantic around 1000 BC, affecting in particular Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.

http://www.sis-group.org.uk/cambproc.htm

Btw, Alewyn used Peiser's date of 2200 BCE for his book about the OLB, but Peiser has adjusted that date to 2300 BCE (elsewhere it was said to be 2350 BCE):

Benny Peiser then summarises a survey he has made of around 500 reports of late 3rd millennium BC civilisation collapse and climate change, which shows a significant clustering around 2300 BC. Most sites in Europe, the Middle East, India and China where civilisation collapsed at this time show clear signs of natural disasters and/or rapid abandonment, whilst around the world there is strong evidence of water-level and vegetation changes, glacier and desert expansion, seismic activity, floods and extinctions of animal species. He concludes that only extraterrestrial bodies acting on terrestrial systems could produce the range of glaciological, geological and archaeological features reported.

http://www.sis-group.org.uk/cambproc.htm

That Peiser initially used the date of 2200 BCE could have been because he was influenced by someone who also talked during such a conference (or by articles sent to the SIS), and it was about the OLB :

http://www.sis-group.org.uk/search/node/oera

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1200 BCE again:

Abstract

Identified in April of 1995, and still without geologic definitive prove of its origin, it was applied to the Panela crater (PE)a multidisciplinary study to investigate its cosmic origin. From geometric data of the crater it was possible to determine the size of the meteoroid, direction and angle of fall of the meteor that formed it. The ray (300 km) of vision of its troposphere explosion and the projection of 1000 km of the bolides’ trajectory from the impact place were analyzed in the Northeast region of Brazil. Archaeological sites with presence of meteoritic rock art theme were mapped in this region. The relation of the observer’s position, the parallax and his view of the phenomenon in the sky were investigated on these prehistoric registers, from different sites. The analyses of the rock arts of these prehistoric sites are coherent for a cosmic phenomenon, a Tunguska like (1908) event for the Panela crater formation, the Tupana event, around the year 1200 B.C.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/42492391/THE-PREHISTORIC-REPRESENTATIONS-OF-THE-TUPANA-EVENT-IN-NORTHEASTERN-BRAZIL-PIERSON-BARRETTO-Arcaeoastronomy-Expert

The Panela Crater(field) is located in Pernambuco, Brazil, at the north-eastern shouldertip of South America.

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When Hidde said in the OLB " writen at Liudwert in the 3449th year after Atland was submerged.....that is according to the christian reckoning the year 1256 "

what dating system do we think he was using ?, from creation presumably , but Hebrew , or Byzantine or Persian were you in the north over-run by a mongul/turk invasion , did they use a sumerian dating system , it would not be the Julian calendar , and the gregorian did not start till the 1500's , and he is not using reign lengths.

so what would a 13th century fris be using at that time ?

that gave a 2193 BC reading of Atland sinking , is there a way we can backtrack , and know if the sinking of Atland is the biblical flood ?

The timetable of the OLB is based on the timetable published in each issue the Frisian Almanak (1836-1852). s. http://www.wumkes.nl...ndex.php?per=fa .

Edited by Knul

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The timetable of the OLB is based on the timetable published in each issue the Frisian Almanak (1836-1852). s. http://www.wumkes.nl...ndex.php?per=fa .

I assume Dr. No doesn't read Dutch....

This is from the "Friesche Volksalmanak" from 1839:

2193BC-FriescheVolksalmanak-1839.jpg

The first underlined line says: "The year after the birth of our Lord Jesus Christ: 1839"

The second underlined line says: "Since the Flood: 4032"

1839-4032=2193 / no year zero, so it becomes 2194 BC

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=184645&st=7635#entry4118424

The fourth, ‘Deucalion’s flood’, occurred in the Bronze age, around 2200 BC.

http://books.google.nl/books?id=JlA7BWfNcPAC&pg=PA103&lpg=PA103&dq=The+fourth,+%E2%80%98Deucalion%E2%80%99s+flood%E2%80%99,+occurred+in+the+Bronze+age,+around+2200+BC.&source=bl&ots=7ZOO1_n_jy&sig=vCCTvzoQn7dHSOTofcqe51hwQYU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=SF_dUK_6OqXs0gXj6oGACg&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=The%20fourth%2C%20%E2%80%98Deucalion%E2%80%99s%20flood%E2%80%99%2C%20occurred%20in%20the%20Bronze%20age%2C%20around%202200%20BC.&f=false

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Thanks guys ,so by these systems in the almanack the year of the flood was:-

In the Greek system( Byzantine ? ) ...............................3315 AM

in the Julian system ( Roman or Rumian)....................2520 AM.............would have been nice if they had used the JUUL-ian system

in the Jewish system(Jutische )..................................... 1568 AM..............closest to jewish trad of 1656 AM.. but 88 years difference

have i got that correct , i have a really bad head cold not sure the grey matter is working properly.........but seems to me hidde worked out the AD year from the Jewish time used on what he was copying..............

jewish date from 1839 almanac 5600 - 1839 years , - 2193 years =1568

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Thanks guys ,so by these systems in the almanack the year of the flood was:-

In the Greek system( Byzantine ? ) ...............................3315 AM

in the Julian system ( Roman or Rumian)....................2520 AM.............would have been nice if they had used the JUUL-ian system

in the Jewish system(Jutische )..................................... 1568 AM..............closest to jewish trad of 1656 AM.. but 88 years difference

have i got that correct , i have a really bad head cold not sure the grey matter is working properly.........but seems to me hidde worked out the AD year from the Jewish time used on what he was copying..............

jewish date from 1839 almanac 5600 - 1839 years , - 2193 years =1568

It is not yet clear what source the Frisian Almanak has used.

Edited by Knul

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Today I watched a movie from 1965, "The War Lord". It is about a knight in Normandy fighting of Frisian raiders in the 11th century.

So I wanted to know if that actually happened as portrayed in the movie (starring Charlton Heston), but I found something else...

I have often said that nothing Irish is ever mentioned in the OLB, although Frisians and closely related tribes (Menapii and C(h)auci did settle in Ireland (and Scotland), very long before the middle ages.

Well, the next is not about that early period (Roman times) but later.

I have stumbled once or twice on "Yola" a now extinct dialect in Ireland. But what I didn't realize is where that language may have originated....

OK, so I found this:

In Wexford, a language called Yola was spoken until the 19th century. Yola was

spoken in areas where the Flemish were known to have settled with grants from

Henry II. Linguists have found it unlikely that Yola is related to modern

Flemish. If, however, the language of the Flemish in the 11th and 12th

centuries was Frisian, or a derivative of Frisian, then that might explain

something about the origin of Yola.

Further, the Frisians had been known to dominate the North Sea, to the point

where it had been called the Frisian Sea. I wonder what happened to the

Frisians. I also wonder if some of what we now call Viking raids might have

been Frisian raids, or if some of the Normans were really Frisian rather than

Norse. if the Frisians were more active than they have been given credit for,

that could explain some confusing issues in the history of the English language,

as well. further, if the Frisians lost a homeland to flood and conquest, and

resettled in England, and brought a military tradition of archery with them,

that might explain the prominence of archery in English military history.

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/ancient_waterways_society/message/2338

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yola_language

What this person posted, that Viking raids may have been Frisian raids instead, is what I have discussed quite often in this thread. It is known the Frisii hooked up with the Chaucii who were raiding the seas during Roman times, and it is also suggested that the Vikings actually learned the 'art' from the Frisians.

But what makes the Yola language interesting is that it might be an other source of knowledge for Old Frisian, and might help us explain certain words in the OLB (no, I could not find "Lumka-makia", lol).

Here is a glossary :

http://books.google.nl/books?id=KBEHAAAAQAAJ&printsec=titlepage&dq=A+Yola+Zong&redir_esc=y

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Some will remember that the idea that the OLB guy called "Inka" ended up in South America (or the suggestion that he did, think Incas) most probably originated with the chroniclers Adam von Bremen (11th century) and Martinus Hamconius.

The interesting thing is that maybe there is proof they really ended up in NW America, Baffin Island, because of a recent find there.

So I started this thread in another UM forum:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=239995

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Today I watched a movie from 1965, "The War Lord". It is about a knight in Normandy fighting of Frisian raiders in the 11th century.

So I wanted to know if that actually happened as portrayed in the movie (starring Charlton Heston), but I found something else...

I have often said that nothing Irish is ever mentioned in the OLB, although Frisians and closely related tribes (Menapii and C(h)auci did settle in Ireland (and Scotland), very long before the middle ages.

Well, the next is not about that early period (Roman times) but later.

I have stumbled once or twice on "Yola" a now extinct dialect in Ireland. But what I didn't realize is where that language may have originated....

OK, so I found this:

In Wexford, a language called Yola was spoken until the 19th century. Yola was

spoken in areas where the Flemish were known to have settled with grants from

Henry II. Linguists have found it unlikely that Yola is related to modern

Flemish. If, however, the language of the Flemish in the 11th and 12th

centuries was Frisian, or a derivative of Frisian, then that might explain

something about the origin of Yola.

Further, the Frisians had been known to dominate the North Sea, to the point

where it had been called the Frisian Sea. I wonder what happened to the

Frisians. I also wonder if some of what we now call Viking raids might have

been Frisian raids, or if some of the Normans were really Frisian rather than

Norse. if the Frisians were more active than they have been given credit for,

that could explain some confusing issues in the history of the English language,

as well. further, if the Frisians lost a homeland to flood and conquest, and

resettled in England, and brought a military tradition of archery with them,

that might explain the prominence of archery in English military history.

http://tech.groups.y...ty/message/2338

http://en.wikipedia....i/Yola_language

What this person posted, that Viking raids may have been Frisian raids instead, is what I have discussed quite often in this thread. It is known the Frisii hooked up with the Chaucii who were raiding the seas during Roman times, and it is also suggested that the Vikings actually learned the 'art' from the Frisians.

But what makes the Yola language interesting is that it might be an other source of knowledge for Old Frisian, and might help us explain certain words in the OLB (no, I could not find "Lumka-makia", lol).

Here is a glossary :

http://books.google....ong&redir_esc=y

Yes, I had heard of, maybe even mentioned this language here, I'd seen it on the Anglo-Frisian Wiki page - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Frisian_languages

Interesting the word Yola actually means 'old'. I was thinking it sounded somewhat like Jul - Yol Jol - so what Jul means might even connect, who knows. Whatever the case, named because it was an 'old' language perhaps. The Jul/Jol/Yola language.

I don't really see the below mentioned characteristic when i read the OLB though.

One striking characteristic of Yola was the fact that stress was shifted to the second syllable of words in many instances: morsaale "morsel", hatcheat "hatchet", dineare "dinner", readeare "reader", weddeen "wedding", etc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yola_language

I've have a look at the glossary you linked too.

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Some will remember that the idea that the OLB guy called "Inka" ended up in South America (or the suggestion that he did, think Incas) most probably originated with the chroniclers Adam von Bremen (11th century) and Martinus Hamconius.

The interesting thing is that maybe there is proof they really ended up in NW America, Baffin Island, because of a recent find there.

So I started this thread in another UM forum:

http://www.unexplain...howtopic=239995

Yup saw the new thread ....the part about lief erikson,.........ie. son of red erik. and friesians........the name friederik may connect the two.. sort of frie/frei/ red and eric all mixed together.

Edited by NO-ID-EA

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I don't really see the below mentioned characteristic when i read the OLB though.

One striking characteristic of Yola was the fact that stress was shifted to the second syllable of words in many instances: morsaale "morsel", hatcheat "hatchet", dineare "dinner", readeare "reader", weddeen "wedding", etc

http://en.wikipedia....i/Yola_language

I've have a look at the glossary you linked too.

We don't really know how the OLB language is pronounced. I am also not suggesting that the OLB language IS the Yola language, only that the Yola language may have preserved words and expressions we cannot find in the Old Frisian dictionaries we all have used for this thread, and that is because no one thought of Yola as a possible old form of Frisian.

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Yup saw the new thread ....the part about lief erikson,.........ie. son of red erik. and friesians........the name friederik may connect the two.. sort of frie/frei/ red and eric all mixed together.

Frederick is a masculine given name meaning "peaceful ruler." It is the English form of the German name Friedrich. Its meaning is derived from the Germanic word elements frid, or peace, and ric, meaning "ruler" or "power."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_%28given_name%29

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The next pdf gives a nice summary of Frisian history and the pre-history of the Netherlands:

The Wadden Sea Region: A Unique Cultural Landscape

by Otto S. Knottnerus, Zuidbroek

For long, permanent settlement was largely

restricted to the edges of the coastal area.

Dozens of sites were located on moraine hillocks

and river dunes, where they were subsequently

buried under marine or riverine sediments or

became overgrown by the mires. In fact, most of

these settlements may be considered as outposts

of the upland funnel-beaker civilization. Appar-

ently, their inhabitants fled the area as soon as

the impact of rising sea levels came to be felt.

Near Delfzijl Neolithic settlers built a megalithic

chambered tomb about 3350 BC. After 2200 BC

the site disappeared under several feet of clay

and peat. Settlement remains are known from

Emden and Winsum (Groningen), but scattered

findings suggest that human activities extended

far into the present Wadden Sea. As much as 77

megalithic graves and 1,000 Bronze Age barrows

are located on Sylt, Föhr and Amrum alone,

whereas the adjoining mudflats and sandbanks

provided dozens of flint daggers and sickles.

Barrows and megalithic graves are also numerous

in the upland districts.

As sea-level rise slowed-down, other tribesmen

began to reclaim the coastal plains. The

oldest known maritime settlements, dating

about 2600 BC, have been found in a former salt

marsh area in West-Friesland. Archaeologists

assume that the beach-ridges may have been

settled even earlier. The earliest findings are

associated with the Vlaardingen civilization

(3500-2500 BC), an amphibious counterpart of

the upland funnel-beaker settlements. But the

overall picture is very incomplete, due to coastal

erosion. Apparently, local people have learned to

build seaworthy boats at an early date. Even the

oldest marshland settlement reveals traces of

haddock, caught in open sea. Wherever possible,

diets were supplemented by large amounts of

shellfish. During the Bronze Age (2100-600 BC)

the island of Helgoland, 100 km off the coast,

apparently developed into a center of copper

production, flint mining and amber trade. The

moraine island of Texel has also been inhabited

since the Bronze Age.

About 1350 BC Bronze Age farmers settled

down at a former salt marsh estuary near

Hoogkarspel (Noord-Holland). As far as we

known, they were the first marshland dwellers

who held out against rising water levels by

building their farmsteads on raised platforms.

Another Bronze Age settlement has been found

at the Weser River banks near Rodenkirchen. In

either case, settlements were abandoned before

the beginning of the Iron Age.

http://www.waddensea...eport/chap2.pdf

2.6.3 Early Medieval Time and Viking Age

(400-1050 AD)

(...)

Christianized merchants from the Frisian districts

played an important part as middlemen

between the Frankish kingdom and the semitribal

societies of Northern Europe. Their kinsmen

established outposts far beyond the borders

of the Empire. Trade concentrated on exchanging

foreign luxury products, which were vital for the

gift economy of local warlords and their retainers.

The port towns were newly created under the protection

of local magnates and royal representatives.

Houses were situated along riverbanks

and tidal creeks, where the inhabitants

could easily moor their cargo ships and pull them

ashore. These flat-bottomed sailing ships are

considered the forerunners of the Hanseatic cog

ship (kogge), of which an example from 1380 is

exhibited in the Bremerhaven shipping museum.

The most famous of the maritime emporia

were the towns of Dorestadt (Wijk bij Duurstede

near Utrecht) and Hedeby/Haithabu (Schleswig).

The former was the gate to the German

Rhineland, the latter controlled the shipping

route from the Baltic along the Eider and Treene

Rivers towards the North Sea. The towns of Ribe

and neighboring Dankirke, Hamburg, Bardovick

(Landkreis Lüneburg), Stade, Brüggehusen (Bremerhaven-

Lehe), Bremen, Jever, Emden, Stavoren

and Medemblik had a similar history. Moreover,

foreign outposts were established along Europe’s

main waterways from Scandinavia to Britain

(York) and down to the Rhine and Loire valleys.

This was not only the case in the towns, but

sometimes also in the surrounding countryside.

In most cases, Frisian presence is documented by

the pottery meagered with grinded musselshells.

Frisian grave-goods have been discovered

in Darum near Ribe, along the banks of the Elbe

river and in Dunum (Landkreis Wittmund). The

Frisian guild in Sigtuna (Sweden) existed up to

the 11th century. Cities like Cologne, Mainz and

Strasbourg had their own Frisian quarters,

Frisian small coins (sceattas) were widespread,

whereas the North Sea was sometimes called

‘Mare fresicum’.

Consequently, international commerce brought

the Frisians homelands in contact with foreign

countries all over Europe. In the Wadden Sea

Region a new type of village came into existence:

oblong mercantile dwelling mounds, situated

along tidal creeks, populated by merchants,

skippers and artisans, and protected by a local

lord. In many cases these villages developed into

centers of political and ecclesiastical power, as

was the case with Emden, Farmsum,

Appingedam, Winsum, Dokkum, Leeuwarden,

Bolsward, Oldeboorn, Stavoren and Medemblik.

(...)

On the whole, foreign visitors were surprised

by the prosperity of the coastal inhabitants.

Archaeological findings show a rich and diverse

material culture, witnessing extensive commercial

contacts and a considerable degree of specialization.

Next to stockbreeding, sheep breeding

and some arable farming, people were

engaged the production of cloth, salt and hides.

Spinning, dying and weaving were female work.

Weaving patters were sometimes quite delicate.

Apparently, the woad-died cloths served as currency.

Quality and quantity was dropping in the

Late Middle Ages, probably due to competition

from Flanders. Nordfriesland was a last resort. By

the middle of the 16th century, however, local

production had come to a halt.

http://www.waddensea...eport/chap2.pdf

Add to that what I posted long ago about the Frisians during the Crusades, and you'll get an idea why someone wanted to give the Frisians their own 'ancient history' by transplanting medieval events to a time thousands of years earlier.

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Edited by Abramelin

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