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Waspie_Dwarf

X-37B lands at Vandenberg

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The Vandenberg Air Force Base Press release is reproduced below:

X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle lands at Vandenberg AFB

Posted 12/3/2010 Updated 12/3/2010

30th Space Wing Public Affairs

12/3/2010 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The U.S. Air Force's first unmanned re-entry spacecraft landed at Vandenberg Air Force Base at 1:16 a.m. today.

The X-37B, named Orbital Test Vehicle 1 (OTV-1), conducted on-orbit experiments for more than 220 days during its maiden voyage. It fired its orbital maneuver engine in low-earth orbit to perform an autonomous reentry before landing.

The X-37B is the newest and most advanced re-entry spacecraft. Managed by the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office (AFRCO), the X-37B program performs risk reduction, experimentation and concept of operations development for reusable space vehicle technologies.

"Today's landing culminates a successful mission based on close teamwork between the 30th Space Wing, Boeing and the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office," said Lt Col Troy Giese, X-37B program manager from the AFRCO. "We are very pleased that the program completed all the on-orbit objectives for the first mission."

OTV-1's de-orbit and landing mark the transition from the on-orbit demonstration phase to a refurbishment phase for the program.

The Air Force is preparing to launch the next X-37B, OTV-2, in Spring 2011 aboard an Atlas V booster..

Source: Vandenberg Air Force Base

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle lands at Vandenberg AFB

101203f9709s10766578376.jpg

(U.S. Air Force photo)

101203f9709s20167717326.jpg

(U.S. Air Force photo/ Michael Stonecypher)

12/3/2010 - The X-37B sits on the Vandenberg Air Force base runway during post-landing operations Dec. 3. Personnel in SCAPE (Self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble) suits conduct initial checks on the vehicle and ensuring the area is safe.

Source: USAF - Photos

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The Boeing Press release is reproduced below:

Boeing Built X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle Successfully Completes 1st Flight

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Dec. 3, 2010 -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] today announced the successful de-orbit and landing of the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV), also known as the X-37B, for the U.S. Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office (RCO). The X-37B landed at 1:16 a.m. Pacific time today, concluding its more than 220-day experimental test mission. It was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on April 22.

sef1011611001x37b616324.jpg

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Dec. 3, 2010 -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] today announced the successful

de-orbit and landing of the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV), also known as the X-37B, for the U.S. Air Force Rapid

Capabilities Office (RCO). The X-37B is shown here after landing at 1:16 a.m. Pacific time today, concluding its

more than 220-day experimental test mission. It was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on

April 22.

# # #

Photo credit: Boeing photo

Neg. #: SEF10-11611-001

sef1003278004x37b657404.jpg

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Dec. 3, 2010

-- Boeing [NYSE: BA] today announced the successful

de-orbit and landing of the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV),

also known as the X-37B, for the U.S. Air Force Rapid

Capabilities Office (RCO). The X-37B, shown here in a

photo from before its launch, landed at 1:16 a.m.

Pacific time today, concluding its more than 220-day

experimental test mission. It was launched from Cape

Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on April 22.

# # #

Photo credit: Boeing photo

Neg. #: SEF10-03278-004

sef1011611003x37b721884.jpg

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Dec. 3, 2010 -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] today announced the successful

de-orbit and landing of the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV), also known as the X-37B, for the U.S. Air Force Rapid

Capabilities Office (RCO). The X-37B is shown here after landing at 1:16 a.m. Pacific time today, concluding its

more than 220-day experimental test mission. It was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on

April 22.

# # #

Photo credit: Boeing photo

Neg. #: SEF10-11611-003

The X-37B is the United States' first unmanned vehicle to return from space and land on its own. Previously, the space shuttle was the only space vehicle capable of returning to Earth. The success of this inaugural mission demonstrates that unmanned space vehicles can be sent into orbit and safely recovered.

"We congratulate the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office and the 30th Space Wing at Vandenberg Air Force Base on the success of this mission," said Paul Rusnock, Boeing vice president of Experimental Systems and program director for the X-37B. "This marks a new era in space exploration, and we look forward to the launch of the second vehicle in 2011. By combining the best of aircraft and spacecraft into an affordable, responsive unmanned vehicle, Boeing has delivered an unprecedented capability to the RCO."

The X-37B program is demonstrating a reliable, reusable unmanned space test platform for the Air Force. Its objectives include space experimentation, risk reduction, and concept-of-operations development for reusable space vehicle technologies that could become key enablers for future space missions.

Boeing's commitment to this space-based unmanned vehicle spans a decade and includes support to the Air Force Research Lab's X-40 program, NASA's X-37 program, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's X-37 Approach & Landing Test Vehicle (ALTV) program.

Boeing program management, engineering, manufacturing, test and mission support functions for the OTV program are conducted at Boeing sites in Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, and El Segundo, Calif.

A unit of The Boeing Company, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is one of the world's largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world's largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is a $34 billion business with 68,000 employees worldwide. Follow us on Twitter: @BoeingDefense.

# # #

Contact:

Diana Ball

Boeing Space & Intelligence Systems

Office: 562-797-4303

Mobile: 714-319-1014

diana.ball@boeing.com

Source: Boeing Press Release

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They released this Info the 6th of Dec to the media it seems that It takes three days for our Gov,to let the Average Jo inon where there money is Going?

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They released this Info the 6th of Dec to the media it seems that It takes three days for our Gov,to let the Average Jo inon where there money is Going?

I'm not sure which info you are talking about DONTEATUS. Those press releases were released on (and the first one at least, posted by me) on the 3rd December. As for letting the average Joe know where the money is going, this is supposed to be a secret project.

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I'm not sure which info you are talking about DONTEATUS. Those press releases were released on (and the first one at least, posted by me) on the 3rd December. As for letting the average Joe know where the money is going, this is supposed to be a secret project.

Oh !! like the Aurora was to be also, I guess the Really Kool stuff gets out sooner or later right? Keep up the Great Work Waspie!

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Oh !! like the Aurora was to be also, I guess the Really Kool stuff gets out sooner or later right? Keep up the Great Work Waspie!

The Aurora may or may not exist (and probably isn't called Aurora). The X-37B is an open secret. The USAF is open about it's existence, it's what it's mission is that is secret.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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