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Saru

Why do mosquitoes not die in the rain ?

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The average raindrop is 50 times bigger than a mosquito, so how do they avoid being killed ?

Scientists have thus long pondered how mosquitoes can fly through a rainstorm without getting killed by such collisions, the impact of which is comparable to a human being hit by a bus.

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When I was fairly young, (a long time ago), the reason mosquitos dont get hit by rainfall was explained by the fact that the falling droplet of water builds up air pressure in front of it (on the underside). When the droplet of water approaches the small insect the air pressure forces the insect out of the way. They even had slow mo video footage of this actually occuring. However, in a heavy downpour the chances of survival were slim.

Then I read this artlcle whcih says

(quote)

''The short answer is that the mosquitoes are so light that they simply hitch a ride on the raindrop without any significant force being transferred to them''

I know which one sounds more feasable :)

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Posted (edited)

Hmmm...i dont know.....i do know a rolled up newspaper does the trick quite well...

Edited by BrianPotter
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The bottom line is that mosquitoes shouldn't fly close to the ground in a rainstorm.

I like this line, they make it sound like mosquitoes can be educated. :D

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Posted (edited)

I like this line, they make it sound like mosquitoes can be educated. :D

They're a lot more capable than some humans I know.

Edited by Octans
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Smacking a skeet out of the air with your hand does nothing to it. Smacking a skeet on a solid surface creates skeet goo. Not a surprising find.

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Mosquitos are just unnatural. :P

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Rain drops are 50x larger than a mosquito...they obviously haven't seen the mosquitos where I live...

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Magic.

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Raindrops are not 50 times bigger than a mosquito,, raindrops range in size from 0.5mm t 3mm diameter,, and no species of mosquito ranges in size of 0.01mm to 0.06mm..

Plain stupid

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acctually mosquitos are 50x bigger than a rain drop.

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After reading the LA Times article.. It should read "... raindrops are 50 times HEAVIER than a mosquito", which does make more sense, however the author obviously hasn't been to Australia where we have the world's biggest (and therefore, heaviest) Mozzies!

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Bet a hailstone would slap them silly.

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Hmm... Interesting. I thought they did like most life forms and just took cover somewhere until it stopped raining. I did not think they were hopping into big rain drops, then jumping off before they hit the ground. Seems like a whole lot of trouble.

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GRRR is there no stop to these things!!!!!

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