Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
JonathanVonErich

The Disappearance of Louis Le Prince

32 posts in this topic

Since I do have access to Lizzie's memoirs, if anyone else has a question about the disappearance and Lizzie or Adolphe's attempts at resoving the disappearance, I would be happy to research it for you. I hope that the information I have provided so far has been of interest and value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Memphisbelle.

It appears that you have access to documents which contain information contrary to what's been reported for over a hundred years, and I have to question it.

The info has been that LePrince's brother accompanied him to the station- that the brother was the last known person to see and speak to LePrince, and that LePrince was expected to meet with friends at a certain time and place, but never arrived.

The question has been..."Why didn't LePrince arrive at the station?" It seems to me there should never have been a question if your info is accurate- that LePrince simply altered his plans. The impression has been that LePrince wasn't where he was expected to be WHEN he was expected to be there.

And let me back up; I would find it very odd that LePrince would alter his plans, seemingly at the last moment- because of what I stated above- he was expected by others, elsewhere.

Bottom line, considering the relationship of the letter writer to the brother, the info within the letter must be taken with a grain of salt.

Re: the drowned man, the clothing could have been used for identification- by size and style, and same for shoes, but I suggest that without the knowledge of whether or not the body was clothed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Regi

No. The information out there on the internet is only about 25 years old and most of it relates to Chris Rawlence's book, "The Missing Reel" that Chris began to write after he visited my family in 1986. The documents in my possession are from the persons who knew Leprince and were intimately acquainted with him, not persons writing internet articles and blogs from second hand sources. This is why it is so important to me that the right information gets out there.

Leprince was delayed because he needed to finalize having an inheritance signed over to him and his brother was dealing with professional matters and could not see him about this very legal, not to be taken casual matter until a few days after Leprince arrived. You don't just say, "Dear me, I have to leave now, someone is waiting for me in Paris, Hang the inheritance that I need to finance my invention." They also didn't have cell phones in those days to notify those who might be inconvienced by the delays.

The question isn't "Why didn't Leprince arrive at the station?", the question is "What happened to him on September 16, 1890?". I believe he did get off the train in Paris.

As I have stated before, the relationship between Albert and "Gus" was very close. This is borne up by documentation that is contemporary to the time of his disappearance and this makes this information relevant and NOT to be "taken with a grain of salt".

What the drowned man was or was not wearing at the time is irrelevant. Apparently, if there was a description of the body (and what it was wearing) it no longer exists today. Identification of a drownng victim (of which there were dozens per year) was accomplished by placing the corpse in a chilled room with a large window at one end. Passersby could view the deceased through this window to make an identification. Remember, at this time, no one was looking for a dead body. They assumed for weeks that he was delayed somewhere else. By the time foul play was suggested, the body was buried or cremated. The issue Lizzie had with the authorities in three countries was indifference to her husband's fate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know of the circumstances surrounding the "drowned" man- or if he actually was was drowned- and I don't know why the photo was located in the police file without any documentation, but if he was drowned, and his body was pulled from the river on the same day that LePrince boarded the train, it's highly unlikely that the body was that of LePrince because depending on environmental conditions, it's at least about two days before a body will resurface.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know of the circumstances surrounding the "drowned" man- or if he actually was was drowned- and I don't know why the photo was located in the police file without any documentation, but if he was drowned, and his body was pulled from the river on the same day that LePrince boarded the train, it's highly unlikely that the body was that of LePrince because depending on environmental conditions, it's at least about two days before a body will resurface.

Very well said Regi, I agree. :tu:

I doubt that the "drowned" man on the picture is indeed Le Prince. Where is the evidence that it's him ?? There's none, therefore I'm highly skeptical about this possibility.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love your true crime threads, they are always so interesting! Where do you find all these stories?? I would love to just pick your brain!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Viviana, glad you like my threads, I appreciate the comment. :tu:

Well I have discovered hundreds of interesting cases by reading books, simple as that. I have 97 books or Encyclopedias about True Crime/Killers/Unsolved Cases/Organized Crime, and the more I buy books the more I discover new cases. :)

If you want to discover hundreds of cases then I recommend these 5 books. In my opinion these books are a must if, like me, you enjoy reading about crimes. All 5 are available on Amazon.com for a good price:

The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes, by Michael Newton - Over 800 unsolved cases are presented in this book, a must-buy.

The Encyclopedia of American Crime, by Carl Sifakis - Hundreds of cases/killers are profiled in this book, most of them from the late 1800's and early 1900's.

The Almanac of World Crime, by Jay Robert Nash - Hundreds of cases/killers/gangs from all over the world are profiled, lot of obscure cases.

The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers, by Michael Newton - Hundreds of Serial Killers are profiled, plus a section about Unidentified killers from all over the world.

The Mammoth Book of Bizarre Crimes, by Robin Odell - Collection of 300 bizarre cases from all over the world.

Edited by JonathanVonErich
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.