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jugoso

US military suicide rate hits one per day

25 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

"We are deeply concerned about suicide in the military," a Pentagon spokeswoman said, adding it was "one of the most urgent problems" they faced.

While the reasons for the increase are not entirely understood, the Defence department's own data suggest soldiers with multiple combat tours are at greater risk. But a portion of those taking their own life have never deployed, the figures show.

Suicide in the forces had levelled off during 2010 and 2011, but 2012 has seen the fastest pace since the US war in Afghanistan began in 2001.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...canada-18371377

Edited by jugoso

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The soldiers are the true victims of war. They're told to fight, they watch people die on a daily basis and when they return they're told 'thank for your service, now get over it.'

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there surposed to kill the enemy not themselves!!

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I supported the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I was furious, like most Americans, about 9-11. I have since repented that sentiment regarding Iraq. The soldiers did what they thought was right and they should be always treated with highest regard and given the help they now need. But the ultimate way to honor them is to take away one of the greatest stressors there is in their service, that of multiple re-deployments. If America needs to employ troops on foreign battlefields for extended periods of time to keep the nation safe then there should be no problem returning to a military draft. If that reality is too painful for coward politicians to entertain then we shouldn't go to war...period. We are literally using up the best of ourselves in these wars. It's time for it to stop unless we are going to spread the burden around to all who are able to serve. I even think the age limits should be re-examined. If an older person has a skill that is critical whether in engineering or medicine or ANYTHING and they are in good enough health to serve in support roles for a couple of years then they should serve also. I'd be willing to be an MRI tech in the service to free up some younger tech to serve closer(just as an example). My point is that these people are dying because of abandonment and unfair demands being made on them. If we don't act soon then stories like the one where the soldier murdered the innocents in Afghanistan will probably become more common.... they are human and they are breaking under the stress.

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Also Sprach the Dogs of War.

A suicide rate twice the population at large, and many more thinking about it.

One cannot make a silk purse from a sow's ear, yet so many in our society attempt to do so daily. Perpetual futility.

Took the nation to war under fraud and deceit, and not even impeached.

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The soldiers are the true victims of war. They're told to fight, they watch people die on a daily basis and when they return they're told 'thank for your service, now get over it.'

They are not told to fight. They choose to fight. That is a significant difference, if you ask me.

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They are not told to fight. They choose to fight. That is a significant difference, if you ask me.

Many choose to fight because in this country a college degree is very important to getting a better job and soldiers are given tuition assistance as well as earning money while in the service. The way the job/education/consumer system works is bound to push more towards being in the military not because they want to go to war but because they want to support themselves, become skilled, and try to have a better life.

The problem is after the experience of war they come back and do not have the support and care that they need. Many come back with post traumatic stress that is never treated. I had a friend who suffered a brain lesion that wasn't discovered until 5 or more years after his 2nd tour in Iraq. Lucky for him, he didn't have trouble getting taken care of... many veterans are denied care and pushed to the wayside.

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If somebody joins the military, he has to expect to fight, kill, see terrible things, and might even get killed as well. It's the nature of the thing! No matter for why you chose to be a soldier.

The problem is that education became a business in your country. But that's a whole different topic.

Of course I believe that soldiers need psychological support after they have come back from a "tour" somewhere (of course you'll get problems when these kind of euphemisms are used), but how many are going to admit that it was to much for them? Most won't, because they do not want to be labeled a sissy or even worse by their comrades, who most likely suffer from the same problems.

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They choose to fight. That is a significant difference, if you ask me.

I agree. If you take a job and receive the benefits, you own the conseqences.

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A large portion of them choose to fight, Pat Tillman is an example, because he was utterly deceived by the government about the events of 11 September, the danger of Iraq, and the entire Global War On Terror that was pawned off on the american people and the world by the Military Industrial Complex.

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The problem is that education became a business in your country.

Agreed... it's a huge problem.

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A large portion of them choose to fight, Pat Tillman is an example, because he was utterly deceived by the government about the events of 11 September, the danger of Iraq, and the entire Global War On Terror that was pawned off on the american people and the world by the Military Industrial Complex.

Are you still passing off opinion as fact, or did you know Pat Tillman personally?

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There is too much stress on the soldiers. It's not like the days before helicopters when it took much time to move troops to the sight of a battle. Now they can fly them into one battle right after the other without enough time to recover from what they've been through.

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Posted (edited)

Are you still passing off opinion as fact, or did you know Pat Tillman personally?

His mom did... http://www.thenation...llman-our-hero#

It doesn't say he was deceived but that he was against the war.

Edited by karmakazi
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Thank you Karma.

One day perhaps Bama13 will become informed of recent historical events. Pat Tillman quit a lucrative career with the NFL after the attacks of 11 September. Little did he know they were a false flag operation meant to inflame the passions of the masses.

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There is too much stress on the soldiers. It's not like the days before helicopters when it took much time to move troops to the sight of a battle. Now they can fly them into one battle right after the other without enough time to recover from what they've been through.

Oh they had stress then,even though it might have taken longer to move troops.They should also quote any statistics of suicides from WW2,Korea,VietNam versus what's going on now.

What's different between those wars and soldier suicides today.

When WW2 came ,my dad had a defferment because he was working at Briggs and Stratton in Milwaukee, but he told grandpa he was going in anyway.He didn't go in to the military to get some college education, but because he felt it was his patriotic duty to do so.

He served from 1942 to 1975,and retired after 33 years in the military.Recall him saying once that he modeled his life on his father's side of the family,who have a long tradition of miltary service in Germany going who knows how far back.

There were a lot of things he saw and experienced during WW2 that he never talked about with the family.Maybe he talked to fellow soldiers or the chaplin about them, but not us. Though he did talk about going to Pompeii and being in Rome , and about when he was in North Africa,and some of the things he saw in India and Australia, before they got orders to go to North Africa, instead of continuing further into the pacific.Those he told us.But he understood what a war is, why we were fighting,and that he could get killed or maimed.Maybe they didn't sugar coat it then.He said he was glad he got to serve,and that he went places he would never have seen otherwise.He spent the rest of his career in miltary intelligence.

These men and even women need support to deal with the traumas they have experienced.They need the VA to take their problems seriously whether it's medical or mental.But they have to do something to stop this and help our troops.

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Thank you Karma.

One day perhaps Bama13 will become informed of recent historical events. Pat Tillman quit a lucrative career with the NFL after the attacks of 11 September. Little did he know they were a false flag operation meant to inflame the passions of the masses.

I stand corrected and apologize for my error.

Then you wrote: " Little did he know they were a false flag operation meant to inflame the passions of the masses". So, after apologizing for my last post, I see that you are claiming the "false flag operation" as fact again. If you can prove this one I'll apologize again. Otherwise you are passing your opinion as fact again.

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I appreciate your candor Bama.

Sometimes an opinion happens to coincide with reality, and sometimes it doesn't.

Considering we are into year 10 or 11 of a war precipitated by what I see as a FF, the odds are in my favor. If one considers all that we know, the odds are in my favor.

Pat Tillman's experiences and political views, as well as I can know them based upon what's been published here and there, remind me very much of mine when I was his age in the US Army. I went in with an open mind, fairly well believing all that I had been told. It took only about 2 months in country to realize I had been severely brainwashed.

My fine young E-6 nephew is going through the same process today.

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I appreciate your candor Bama.

Sometimes an opinion happens to coincide with reality, and sometimes it doesn't.

Considering we are into year 10 or 11 of a war precipitated by what I see as a FF, the odds are in my favor. If one considers all that we know, the odds are in my favor.

Pat Tillman's experiences and political views, as well as I can know them based upon what's been published here and there, remind me very much of mine when I was his age in the US Army. I went in with an open mind, fairly well believing all that I had been told. It took only about 2 months in country to realize I had been severely brainwashed.

My fine young E-6 nephew is going through the same process today.

I would like to thank both your nephew and you for your service. Sorry if I seem out of line at times. I am a contrarian by nature. And sometimes an a-hole.

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You seem to be an honest and interested citizen, to me. :tu:

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Agreed... it's a huge problem.

EVERYTHING is a business here.....

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EVERYTHING is a business here.....

Indeed... even breast cancer support has turned into a profit margin... all those companies that make products that are pink or shaped like ribbons and then donate what... 10%? They're still making money... on people's sympathy. And the worst part is, people think they're helping a lot by buying the stuff or sticking a magnet on their car. It's a substitution and all it does is make a person feel good about themselves, while having sent maybe ten cents off to a charity. Commercialism at it's finest!

Sorry, I totally jumped on my soapbox again :)

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I suspect a lot of the suicides are related to wives and girlfriends finding a new man while the soldier is deployed. It's not talked about and the Army even covers it up sometimes so as to not put grief and agony on the unfaithful spouse.

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Posted (edited)

We don't have the draft anymore, thank god, so there's not enough troops for rotation which makes them keep these men over there way too long. It has to take a psychological toll on them.

Edited by Hilander

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I suspect a lot of the suicides are related to wives and girlfriends finding a new man while the soldier is deployed. It's not talked about and the Army even covers it up sometimes so as to not put grief and agony on the unfaithful spouse.

That point was made on Eliot Spitzer's show last night, and it is something I had not considered before.

When I was in Vietnam, all communication with home was by mail. A phone call back home was rare indeed.

Today, these guys might talk to their families several times a week, and many times the anxiety and frustration is conveyed by tone of voice and more.

War is Hell.

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