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Philangeli

Is Allah the same as God in the Bible?

170 posts in this topic

Well if Allah most wonderful and splendorifical is the God of the OT, the God of the Jews, why did it take him 3 religions to get it right? Him being all omni-everything, he should have knocked that out of the park first try right? Why a need for another religion for this God and another, does this God not realize wars are going to be over what he didn't get right and set forth in the first try, Jews against Muslims, Christians against Muslims, etc?

Man has free will and we do as we wish. May be possible that man corrupted the faith they were blessed with. Just as the Jews passed religious laws to please the Romans of the time, and just as Paul has never met Jesus but finds himself with more pull in the BIble than him. Islam came about as something strange and will be regarded as something strange during these times.

You should approach scholars with these types of questions, not hope to poke holes on an outdated forum.

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Hi everyone.

Many thanks for your replies, and apologies if I came across a bit short with anyone.

I am not saying in my OP that I definitely believe that Allah and God are not the same. I was throwing it out for discussion, as I am not sure myself.

However, just to clarify (as one or two posts seemed to misunderstand): 'god' and 'God' are not the same. 'God' (capital G) is the English word to denote the supreme, omnipotent being, whereas 'god' is a lesser being (whether real or imagined).

Theos (Greek), Deus (Latin) and Jehovah/Yahweh (Hebrew) are equivalent terms. They are names, or labels, which denote, or point to, the one, supreme being.

Dios, btw, is just Spanish for God (originating from the Latin Deus).

The question in the OP is: does the name, Allah, point to the one, supreme being, as revealed in the Bible, in the same way as God/Theos/Deus/Yahweh does, or, does the name, Allah, point to one of the multiple gods worshipped at the time of Mohammed, which was then subsequently elevated by Mohammed to the status of supreme, 'numero uno' being, .ie. is the being which muslims worship the same as the being which Christians and Jews worship?

If the answer is yes, then why, throughout history, have muslims tried (often successfully) to islamicize other peoples, when those peoples already believed in the same being?

If the answer is no, then, are muslims (albeit unwittingly) worshipping a pagan god?

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This old chestnut has been debated many times on this board, i'll ask two questions that i've asked before but never had an answer, Mohammed's father was called Abdallah the Arabic translation is "servant of god" who was the god he was servant of?

Allah is an Arabic boys name, would anyone really call their son "God" ?

The Prophets father died before he was born. He was raised by his uncle, Abu Talib, after his mother passed. What relevance would that hold?

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Hi everyone.

Many thanks for your replies, and apologies if I came across a bit short with anyone.

I am not saying in my OP that I definitely believe that Allah and God are not the same. I was throwing it out for discussion, as I am not sure myself.

However, just to clarify (as one or two posts seemed to misunderstand): 'god' and 'God' are not the same. 'God' (capital G) is the English word to denote the supreme, omnipotent being, whereas 'god' is a lesser being (whether real or imagined).

Theos (Greek), Deus (Latin) and Jehovah/Yahweh (Hebrew) are equivalent terms. They are names, or labels, which denote, or point to, the one, supreme being.

Dios, btw, is just Spanish for God (originating from the Latin Deus).

The question in the OP is: does the name, Allah, point to the one, supreme being, as revealed in the Bible, in the same way as God/Theos/Deus/Yahweh does, or, does the name, Allah, point to one of the multiple gods worshipped at the time of Mohammed, which was then subsequently elevated by Mohammed to the status of supreme, 'numero uno' being, .ie. is the being which muslims worship the same as the being which Christians and Jews worship?

If the answer is yes, then why, throughout history, have muslims tried (often successfully) to islamicize other peoples, when those peoples already believed in the same being?

If the answer is no, then, are muslims (albeit unwittingly) worshipping a pagan god?

Wouldn't say "islamicize" is the thought of it. When you view the two other Abrahamic religions and how they have let innovation ruin the core belief system, it is only natural that you wish to call your neighbor,friend,co-worker to what is correct if they are people of the book as well. Even then, Islam is not forced on a person.

This is no different when you may see someone doing something wrong and you take it upon yourself to show them how to do it the right way.

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Yes it is the same God, as some Muslim friends have pointed out the OT of the Bible is a book studied in Islam, Jesus is a Prophet recognised in Islam. Jews, Christians and Muslims are all children of Abraham.

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Hi everyone.

Many thanks for your replies, and apologies if I came across a bit short with anyone.

I am not saying in my OP that I definitely believe that Allah and God are not the same. I was throwing it out for discussion, as I am not sure myself.

However, just to clarify (as one or two posts seemed to misunderstand): 'god' and 'God' are not the same. 'God' (capital G) is the English word to denote the supreme, omnipotent being, whereas 'god' is a lesser being (whether real or imagined).

Theos (Greek), Deus (Latin) and Jehovah/Yahweh (Hebrew) are equivalent terms. They are names, or labels, which denote, or point to, the one, supreme being.

Dios, btw, is just Spanish for God (originating from the Latin Deus).

The question in the OP is: does the name, Allah, point to the one, supreme being, as revealed in the Bible, in the same way as God/Theos/Deus/Yahweh does, or, does the name, Allah, point to one of the multiple gods worshipped at the time of Mohammed, which was then subsequently elevated by Mohammed to the status of supreme, 'numero uno' being, .ie. is the being which muslims worship the same as the being which Christians and Jews worship?

If the answer is yes, then why, throughout history, have muslims tried (often successfully) to islamicize other peoples, when those peoples already believed in the same being?

If the answer is no, then, are muslims (albeit unwittingly) worshipping a pagan god?

As it was pointed out earlier but for some reason ignored, arab speaking christians have one name for God and that is Allah. Why? Because it is what it is in arabic. How many of you are fluent in greek or latin? Likely not many but still are quiet confident that Theos and Dios are the same God like the one in the bible.

Also, ask any nonbiased jew if he thinks that the gid of ot is the same god of nt and the answer will likely be no. Why?

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The Prophets father died before he was born. He was raised by his uncle, Abu Talib, after his mother passed. What relevance would that hold?

You have to read my posts to understand, but i'll write it again, Mohammed's pagan father abdallah who's name means servant of Allah, who is the Allah he was servant to?

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arab speaking christians have one name for God and that is Allah. Why?

Because they speak modern Arabic.

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Posted (edited)

You have to read my posts to understand, but i'll write it again, Mohammed's pagan father abdallah who's name means servant of Allah, who is the Allah he was servant to?

If you are breaking his name down then it means slave of Allah(God.) Some of these arabs fully believed that this is the same God of Christianity and Judaism. The arabs slipped from monotheism and their belief into oneness that was taught by Ishmael (pbuh) and Abraham (pbuh) into idols that can intercede for them in their supplication to God.

So, can I say that he may have believed in God? He may have, but you cannot associate partners with the Creator. I will get a more detailed answer for you on this subject by a person who knows much better on the topic than I.

Edited by Uncle Pockets
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You have to read my posts to understand, but i'll write it again, Mohammed's pagan father abdallah who's name means servant of Allah, who is the Allah he was servant to?

Exactley that is why I used the pagan, prechristian names Gottfried, Bogoljub...and asked you the same question. Who is the god in question? Why do you set different standards for the same example?

Also, noone answered my question if the god from the ot is the same god of the nt. I would like to hear from a christian as well from a jewish person.

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Because they speak modern Arabic.

??? Where is the cutoff for the "old" arabic?

Ever popped in you mind that arab christians called god Allah before Muhammed was even born?

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Posted (edited)

This old chestnut has been debated many times on this board, i'll ask two questions that i've asked before but never had an answer, Mohammed's father was called Abdallah the Arabic translation is "servant of god" who was the god he was servant of?

Semantics, perhaps? The word "god" is the root of the confusion. Humans, in their bodily form, are not capable of defining something infinitely otherworldly. We don't have the right words, first of all. We can't even agree on art, let alone God(?). Then again, there's the "flow," and many call it the Holy Spirit. I believe it's in this world to give hope that there's a reality after this lifetime. Some even say that it incarnates, and Jesus Christ, Krishna, Horus, and Mithra are one and the same cyclical being, if you will. Is the "flow" god of the OT? That, I do not know, and it's becoming trendy among gurus, saints, and conduits to shrug their shoulders and say, "...I don't know." What we all know is that it, the "flow," is capable of opening one's tightly closed heart. It is love beyond compare, after all. Edited by braveone2u

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Exactley that is why I used the pagan, prechristian names Gottfried, Bogoljub...and asked you the same question. Who is the god in question? Why do you set different standards for the same example?

Also, noone answered my question if the god from the ot is the same god of the nt. I would like to hear from a christian as well from a jewish person.

It's not the same, Gottfried is not Gott as abdallah isn't Allah but Allah is a boys name, would people really call there child god, and before you reply "Gottfried is not Gott"

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??? Where is the cutoff for the "old" arabic?

Ever popped in you mind that arab christians called god Allah before Muhammed was even born?

Yes, but up till now i've only found Allah the pagan god and his three daughters, a pre Islamic bible in Arabic would settle it, well it would for those seeking the truth :D

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If you are breaking his name down then it means slave of Allah(God.) Some of these arabs fully believed that this is the same God of Christianity and Judaism. The arabs slipped from monotheism and their belief into oneness that was taught by Ishmael (pbuh) and Abraham (pbuh) into idols that can intercede for them in their supplication to God.

So, can I say that he may have believed in God? He may have, but you cannot associate partners with the Creator. I will get a more detailed answer for you on this subject by a person who knows much better on the topic than I.

I don't understand your post or it could be you didn't understand mine? Mohamed's father worshipped the 360 gods in the kaaba this is before Mohamed invented Islam there was no conceived link to Abraham

Mohammeds father was servant or slave (whichever translation you prefer to use) to Allha who must be one of the 360 idols.

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I don't understand your post or it could be you didn't understand mine? Mohamed's father worshipped the 360 gods in the kaaba this is before Mohamed invented Islam there was no conceived link to Abraham

Mohammeds father was servant or slave (whichever translation you prefer to use) to Allha who must be one of the 360 idols.

Spoken to a brother more studied on the topic than I and after a few words he guided me to this.

http://www.marifah.net/articles/prophetsparentssaved-jalaluddinalsuyuti.pdf

You asked as to who was he a servant to and I stated to you that it was a strong possibility that it was God, and I was not qualified to state anything that was unknown to me in hopes of making a point sir.

Ibn al-Jawzī enumerates in al-Talqīh the names of nine who refused to worship

idols in the time of the Jahiliyya: Abū Bakr al-Siddīq, Zayd ibn `Amr ibn Nufayl,

`Abdullāh ibn Jahsh, `Uthmān ibn al-Huwayrith, Waraqā ibn Nawfal, Rabab ibn alBarrā’, As`ad ibn Kurayb al-Humayrī, Qass ibn Sa`īda al-Iyādī, Abū Qays ibn Sarma.

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Yes it is the same God, as some Muslim friends have pointed out the OT of the Bible is a book studied in Islam, Jesus is a Prophet recognised in Islam. Jews, Christians and Muslims are all children of Abraham.

The Bible may well be studied in Islam, but do muslims actually believe in it, particularly the New Testament, e.g. that Jesus is the Son of God who died on the cross for our sins?

Mohammed was surely aware of some Christian teachings, as there were Christians in the area where he lived. However, those teachings were largely agnostic, e.g. the agnostics believed that Jesus did not die on the cross, that a substitute died in his place. It seems likely that Mohammed took on board some (agnostic) Christian and Jewish teachings to bolster his case for his new religion.

From my knowledge, muslims only study the Bible in order to try and discover things that might support their islamic beliefs, e.g. some muslims believe that Mohammed is mentioned in the Bible.

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Abraham worshipped one God. The same Abraham can be found in Christianity, Judsism and Islam. That suggests God and Allah are the same

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The Bible may well be studied in Islam, but do muslims actually believe in it, particularly the New Testament, e.g. that Jesus is the Son of God who died on the cross for our sins?

Mohammed was surely aware of some Christian teachings, as there were Christians in the area where he lived. However, those teachings were largely agnostic, e.g. the agnostics believed that Jesus did not die on the cross, that a substitute died in his place. It seems likely that Mohammed took on board some (agnostic) Christian and Jewish teachings to bolster his case for his new religion.

From my knowledge, muslims only study the Bible in order to try and discover things that might support their islamic beliefs, e.g. some muslims believe that Mohammed is mentioned in the Bible.

Philangeli if they believed the new testament they would be Christians not Muslims, if Jews believed the new testament they too would be Christians - wait, that's right the first christians were converted Jews. :innocent:

Agnostics by definition are those who have not yet decided that the evidence is sufficient to believe in God or Jesus or any form of Deity - you are thinking of Gnostics, there are christian gnostics who will happily state Jesus died on the cross and was resurrected, he is "The Son of God". The notion of a "substitute" is not something I've spent any time on, nor have any interest in - I've yet to see anything "substantial" on the matter so I'll let others address it if they feel it worth the time tbh.

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Philangeli if they believed the new testament they would be Christians not Muslims, if Jews believed the new testament they too would be Christians - wait, that's right the first christians were converted Jews. :innocent:

Agnostics by definition are those who have not yet decided that the evidence is sufficient to believe in God or Jesus or any form of Deity - you are thinking of Gnostics, there are christian gnostics who will happily state Jesus died on the cross and was resurrected, he is "The Son of God". The notion of a "substitute" is not something I've spent any time on, nor have any interest in - I've yet to see anything "substantial" on the matter so I'll let others address it if they feel it worth the time tbh.

My mistake. Yes, I meant the Gnostics. Even if many muslims are not aware of their influence, it is still there.

Muslims do not accept that Jesus died on the cross, rose from the dead, ascended into heaven and is the second person of the Trinity. They consider him to be a prophet only.

Yes, you are right, neither do Jews. But, perhaps that is the subject of a new topic, as this one is concerned with whether the being referred to as Allah is the same being as referred to as God/Yahweh in the Bible.

But, in passing, both Jews and Christians also refer to God as Abba/Father. Muslims never call Allah their father.

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My mistake. Yes, I meant the Gnostics. Even if many muslims are not aware of their influence, it is still there.

Muslims do not accept that Jesus died on the cross, rose from the dead, ascended into heaven and is the second person of the Trinity. They consider him to be a prophet only.

Yes, you are right, neither do Jews. But, perhaps that is the subject of a new topic, as this one is concerned with whether the being referred to as Allah is the same being as referred to as God/Yahweh in the Bible.

But, in passing, both Jews and Christians also refer to God as Abba/Father. Muslims never call Allah their father.

Nevertheless their God Allah is in their own book the same God as that of Abraham just as for the Jews and Christians, so it is indeed the same one God.

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Nevertheless their God Allah is in their own book the same God as that of Abraham just as for the Jews and Christians, so it is indeed the same one God.

If that is the case, then, why are Jews and Christians often referred to, in the Quran, as unbelievers or infidels?

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If that is the case, then, why are Jews and Christians often referred to, in the Quran, as unbelievers or infidels?

I do not agree with this statement. While, yes, there is a difference in belief, Jews, Christians and Sabinians are reffered to as people of the book.

The book refers to, not only to the bible, but to the, acording to the Quran, one boom in heavens that contains all three scriptures. According to the Quran, all three scriptures are one whose message is delivered in stages. Unfortunately most christians as well as many, many muslims do not understand the Quranic meaning of infidel ot unbeliever and to whom it is directed. It is no different as the old testament.

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My mistake. Yes, I meant the Gnostics. Even if many muslims are not aware of their influence, it is still there.

Muslims do not accept that Jesus died on the cross, rose from the dead, ascended into heaven and is the second person of the Trinity. They consider him to be a prophet only.

Yes, you are right, neither do Jews. But, perhaps that is the subject of a new topic, as this one is concerned with whether the being referred to as Allah is the same being as referred to as God/Yahweh in the Bible.

But, in passing, both Jews and Christians also refer to God as Abba/Father. Muslims never call Allah their father.

Because, I as a muslim, have only one father and only one mother and neither one of them is divine.

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