Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Nonentity

N. Zealand's 'night parrot' brought back from

22 posts in this topic

These birds are cool and I'm glad they are being brought back from the brink of extinction, but the info. shared in this story is a bit weird.

Flightless, slow-moving and at times more sexually attracted to humans than their own species, it's small wonder New Zealand's kakapo parrot is on the verge of extinction.

But a mammoth conservation effort stretching back decades is offering hope for one of the world's rarest birds, lifting its numbers from about 50 in 1990 to 126 this year.

Full story

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fabulous bird.

I like what Douglas Adams had to say about it. Not only can't it fly, but it often forgets that it can't fly. When alarmed, it will run up the nearest tree and launch itself off, where it will proceed to fly like a brick and crash back to earth.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

That's one helmet I wouldn't want to wear.

Glad they are making a come back. I can see where cats and dogs could wipe them out.

Edited by Hilander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think this entire species deserves a darwin award. i dont think they were meant to pass their genes on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Meh.. last parrot I saved told me to "Eff off!"

:(

(numerous times)

Edited by Eldorado
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It reminds me of a modern day dodo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They remind me of artichokes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think this entire species deserves a darwin award. i dont think they were meant to pass their genes on.

It's endangered because of the impact of humans. It was perfectly adapted to live in these island without natural predators. Humans introduced rats and dogs, and messed with it's environment. It was perfectly fine until we got here.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its ADORABLE!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has to be realised that till the arrival of humans, New Zealand had no mammals other than bats, at least for several million years. There were some reptiles, but in the cool climate were not going to be dominant. So it was that birds came to occupy the type of niches that mammals did elsewhere, in a variety of exclusively ground dwelling species. Included in these was the Moa, some species of which were 12 feet tall ! These became extinct following the arrival of the Maori peoples in the middle of the last millenium.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article has made my day & that Stephen Fry piece of footage is priceless. hagl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They brought a couple of juvenile kakapo to a wildlife reserve near where I live a couple of years ago, so they are very cute when they are smaller. It's also very unqiue amongst parrots in the world and is also one of the largest.

And the only reason it mentions "sometimes sexually attracted to humans" is because one was filmed having a fun time with the back of Stephen Fry's head.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to handle exotic animals and species that are almost extinct. It would give me a great feeling being able to help species that are dying off, to help repopulate their populations and make sure they survive. If I could save one almost extinct species, I would be happy and content with my life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love that species.

They look so fluffy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They look half parrot and half owl. Very unusual look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos to the people behind this conservation effort. These are lovely birds.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

They look half parrot and half owl. Very unusual look.

A bird who talks all night, then swoops and tries to kill you? I've met a few of those. :)

p.s. That thing nightowls do with the head is truly amazing.

Edited by Eldorado

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are SO CUTE! They seem so fat and stupid but I want to cuddle them lol. I'm glad their numbers are rising.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are SO CUTE! They seem so fat and stupid but I want to cuddle them lol. I'm glad their numbers are rising.

I know, they're those kind of things that you just want to cuddle so much that you then realise that you've crushed every bone in their body and made them become a vegetable... thankfully, parrots have big beaks to stop you from doing that :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kakapo.. try not to love that. You will not succeed.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kakapo.. try not to love that. You will not succeed.

It's... So... PUDGEY!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool! I saw one at Kiwi Bird Life park when I was in Queenstown last year. I thought the park people said they could be quite the thief. Funny how they prefer humans as mates, but I guess so do I. I would say this would have to be one of the few species in the world where almost every individual has a name!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.