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Eldorado

Splendiferous English!

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What's the most "splendid" word or words you've ever used or heard used?

My own is highlighted below, which I heard on the BBC some years ago.. and never forgot.

"Words, English words, are full of echoes, of memories, of associations -- naturally. They have been out and about, on people's lips, in their houses, in the streets, in the fields, for so many centuries. And that is one of the chief difficulties in writing them today -- they are so stored with meanings, with memories, that they have contracted so many famous marriages.

The splendid word 'incarnadine', for example -- who can use it without remembering also 'multitudinous seas'?

Words belong to each other, although, of course, only a great writer knows that the word 'incarnadine' belongs to 'multitudinous seas'."

--Virginia Woolf

http://atthisnow.blogspot.co.uk/2009/06/craftsmanship-virginia-woolf.html

I did indeed LOL.

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In my capacity as 18th century enthusiast, I have too many to list. I shall have a think about my favourites, as well as what is suitable for a family friendly forum such as UM!

Brilliant idea for a thread...

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Wow, there's a lot of splendid words... Hmm, a plethora of them :yes:

Accoutrements and haberdashery. I use those a lot.

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Here are a few:

Rantipole - A young person who behaves wildly (also a verb, so one can rantipole around town)

Dimber damber - The leader of a gang of rogues

Nicknackatory - Toyshop

Gimcrack - A cheap and tacky bauble

I like rantipole a lot, it's a nice word to say.

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From a work memo.

"Enough of the garrulousness, please."

(I had to google)

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Posted (edited)

digs through the dictionaries

hab habe something .. ahh to hell with it

let's face it this topic is just not for me :D

Edited by Knight Of Shadows
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I like metamorphosis. Great word to indicate change.

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metamorphosis !!

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I don't have any to add right now (I live in Oklahoma - I barely speak English according to some)..

But Al Stewart had a very short little song that fits in...

What the Who's "My Generation" would have sounded like if it were done in 'Proper' English...

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From a work memo.

"Enough of the garrulousness, please."

(I had to google)

Have you been too garrulous, El?

You'll be being too frivolous next...

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Have you been too garrulous, El?

You'll be being too frivolous next...

I hope not... frothiness in business correspondence can be venturesome, Schizoid.

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I have a day-by-day calendar for this year called Forgotten English. It's got some very interesting entries of words we don't use anymore. The one for today is...

aporrhipsis - An insane dislike to clothes. (from John Coxe's Philadelphia Medical Dictionary, 1817)

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Well, Mr. El, if you don't mind, I'll continue adding the words from my calendar. Today's is...

cully - One that maintains a mistress, and parts with money generously to her. (from B. E.'s Dictionary of the Canting Crew, 1699)

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In the course of my work, I have encountered many slang words and phrases and I've been rummaging among my files for good examples. The best come from 16/17th.Cent Legal papers. Here's a few I've selected....

Frummagemmed = hanged or strangled

High Pad = highwayman

Lullypriggers = thieves who steal from washing lines

Drawer-latches = burglars

Pennyweighter = forger

Underdubber = prison guard

...and so on!

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Amalgamate. I like a good amalgamation of accoutrements.

Forthwith. "Let us proceed forthwith to..." is a pretty common phrase amongst my friends.

Jacknape- for that gentleman who is a mules behind.

Spaulders- It's probably my favorite piece of armor.

Toilette- there is just something refined about attending toilette rather than the morning s***, shave, shower or I threw some clothes on.

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Some of my recent favourites:

Sandillions - Numbers like grains of sand on the shore. (in other words... "a lot" of something. lol)

Dalliance - Amorous Play; Trifling

Aphotic - Having no light; relating to the region of a body of water where no sunlight can reach

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Some of my recent favourites:

Sandillions - Numbers like grains of sand on the shore. (in other words... "a lot" of something. lol)

Dalliance - Amorous Play; Trifling

Aphotic - Having no light; relating to the region of a body of water where no sunlight can reach

I love dalliance and use it fairly frequently, such a nice word.

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I love dalliance and use it fairly frequently, such a nice word.

A dalliance a day? lol

Excuse me while I circumambulate.

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In the course of my work, I have encountered many slang words and phrases and I've been rummaging among my files for good examples. The best come from 16/17th.Cent Legal papers. Here's a few I've selected....

Frummagemmed = hanged or strangled

High Pad = highwayman

Lullypriggers = thieves who steal from washing lines

Drawer-latches = burglars

Pennyweighter = forger

Underdubber = prison guard

...and so on!

I'll add footpad, to keep your high pad company.

A few more for you:

Bastonaded - To be cudgelled

Damber - A rascally fellow

Flam - A tall tale

So any dambers telling their flams round here better watch out or they'll find themselves in receipt of a bastonading!

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sistren - The ancient plural of sister. Chaucer speaks of the fates, or weird sisters, as "the fatal sustren." Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms [1848] says that the word is a "vulgarism sometimes heard from uneducated preachers [in] the West" ... It appears, however, that the word was not vulgar in Chaucer's time. It is, as such, as well entitled to a place in pulpit eloquence as its equally antique partner, brethren. (from Charles Mackay's Lost Beauties of the English Language, 1874)

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Posted (edited)

digs through the dictionaries

hab habe something .. ahh to hell with it

let's face it this topic is just not for me :D

Habitual? Habitate? Just throwing my guesses out here...

I like words like erudite and mellifluous, but personally I like Spanish words so much better...

Edited by ScreamingSarcasm
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Another favourite of mine is meretricious. I love that word!

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green gown - To give a lass a green gown, to throw her down upon the grass so that the gown was stained. (from Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914)

Skipping the alternative meaning. :P

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Posted (edited)

What's the most "splendid" word or words you've ever used or heard used?

Splendid <-- well I have used it on occasion lol

Edited by Beckys_Mom
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