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diablo_04

Why does hot water freeze faster?

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You're bored out of your mind too, right ?? :P

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You're bored out of your mind too, right ?? :P

I'm so bored I'm willing to put hot water in the fridge and wait to see how long it needs to freeze :geek:

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I'm so bored I'm willing to put hot water in the fridge and wait to see how long it needs to freeze :geek:

If you put it in the fridge, it won't freeze.

I always though it was a myth that hot water frezes faster than cold.

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If you put it in the fridge, it won't freeze.

I always though it was a myth that hot water frezes faster than cold.

me too.

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Does cold water boil faster than hot water?

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How about making it a real fun event? Put the hot water in the freezer, then paint the freezer door and see which happens first - freezing or drying. How can you be bored?

s7812.gif

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Does cold water boil faster than hot water?

I know that water have different boiling pints, depends of the atmospheric pressure and temperature in that place.

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How about making it a real fun event? Put the hot water in the freezer, then paint the freezer door and see which happens first - freezing or drying. How can you be bored?

s7812.gif

if the windows are closed and i inhale the vapor from the drying paint, I'm sure I won't be bored :w00t:

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Hey its surface area dude!

If you put a flat piece of steak in the fridge it will freeze quicker than if you roll it into a ball and compress it.

If you heat water up to a certain temperature and the molecules are far enough apart, then there will be a microscopic space between particles. This then creates a greater surface area, and the cooling process can occur qiucker.

If I am correct, and you take a disection of the heated/frozen water and compare it to the cooler/frozen water, you should noticed that the heated/frozen water will have a greater amount of trapped air in it, just as hail stones and pumace stones have.

Hey next time you walk past a homeless dude on a cold night, check to see if they are laying flat on their back or curled up in a ball. Yeah well thats my 2cents worth, my break is over, gotta go back to work and flip burgers.

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Posted (edited)

Does cold water boil faster than hot water?

Short answer yes.

Funny too if you add impurities such as salt it will "appear" to boil more vigorously sooner....

But Meh take what I say with a grain of salt... LOL

Edited by Aus Der Box Skeptisch

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I think that hot water freezes quicker than cold water because :-

When water is cold, the water molecules are moving around very slowly.

When water is hot the molecules are moving around very fast.

If the molecules are already moving slowly it takes a lot of energy to slow them to a complete standstill, ie freeze them solid.

But, if the molecules are moving fast but slowing down very quickly due to the cold temperature of the outside environment, they dont need as much energy to take them over the threshold into solid/frozen state.

Does that make any sense? lol :)

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Watched pots never boil.

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Hey its surface area dude!

If you put a flat piece of steak in the fridge it will freeze quicker than if you roll it into a ball and compress it.

If you heat water up to a certain temperature and the molecules are far enough apart, then there will be a microscopic space between particles. This then creates a greater surface area, and the cooling process can occur qiucker.

If I am correct, and you take a disection of the heated/frozen water and compare it to the cooler/frozen water, you should noticed that the heated/frozen water will have a greater amount of trapped air in it, just as hail stones and pumace stones have.

Hey next time you walk past a homeless dude on a cold night, check to see if they are laying flat on their back or curled up in a ball. Yeah well thats my 2cents worth, my break is over, gotta go back to work and flip burgers.

Welcome to the forum Chumpy, great first post.(although i have no idea if it's correct) .

So what cooks faster, a frozen patty or a thawed one?

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Hey GOOD question. I wish I could answer it, but our refridgerator broke down last week, so I won't be able to give you an answer until it gets fixed next week. My question to you is

"How many days can a beef patty stay fresh for?"

I guess the answer to this question will have to be a work-in-progress. But while I'm waiting I might take "ealdwita's" advice and paint the fridge.

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Hey GOOD question. I wish I could answer it, but our refridgerator broke down last week, so I won't be able to give you an answer until it gets fixed next week. My question to you is

"How many days can a beef patty stay fresh for?"

I guess the answer to this question will have to be a work-in-progress. But while I'm waiting I might take "ealdwita's" advice and paint the fridge.

Just dont climb inside the fridge to paint it. Remember, fridges are portals to other universes! :)

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This is bulldust. Hot water freezes quicker than cold water ? Cold water boils sooner than hot water ? Bah, humbug !

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This is bulldust. Hot water freezes quicker than cold water ? Cold water boils sooner than hot water ? Bah, humbug !

Cold water doesn't boil faster than hot water :)

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Because the molecules are moving faster and so the phase change is quicker. As I like to say, "it's in a hurrier". I have no idea. why?

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This is all an old wives tale. Hot water does NOT freeze faster than cold water. I retired from the commercial refrigeration and electrical business and I do know a thing or two about heat transfer.

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I guess this can all be tested easily enough.

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My wife asked me about that, many years ago, so I boiled some water and put it in an ice cube tray and put cold water in another one then put em' in the freezer at te same time. The cold water froze much faster.

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My wife asked me about that, many years ago, so I boiled some water and put it in an ice cube tray and put cold water in another one then put em' in the freezer at te same time. The cold water froze much faster.

are you sure, I mean read the link.

the science world don't depute the clam, but they are not sure why is hot water freezing faster.

If one of you know why, send your explanation with facts and maybe you'll won a 2000$ -10% to me.

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This reminds me...I need to make ice cubes. May as well test it out. :lol:

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does anyone else think they might be posting this to see if there IS a way to make hot water freeze faster then cold water?

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