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Dark matter underpinnings of cosmic web found

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THE skeleton of dark matter that undergirds the cosmic web of matter in the universe has been clearly detected for first time.

We know that matter in the cosmos forms a web, with galaxies and clusters linked by filaments across mostly empty space. Filaments are made of normal matter and dark matter - the unseen stuff that makes up about 85 per cent of the universe's mass. Recent observations have seen the normal matter in such filaments.

Now Jörg Dietrich at the University Observatory in Munich, Germany, and his team have detected the dark matter component in a filament in a supercluster about 2.7 billion light years from us, called Abell 222/223.

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Really? So we cant see dark matter? So how do they know? Is this connected to the higgs boson thing?

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Really? So we cant see dark matter? So how do they know? Is this connected to the higgs boson thing?

Probably, butr here is a worthwhile article about it:

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/researchers-expect-to-solve-the-riddle-of-dark-matter-soon-a-842738.html

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If these "fillaments" are everywhere then why aren't they more abundantly detectable closer to us?

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If these "fillaments" are everywhere then why aren't they more abundantly detectable closer to us?

Good question, next question. But coming back to the article above, in the Grand Sasso experiments they are detecting so many "anormalies" that they are starting to think that not all can be dark matter.

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Good question, next question. But coming back to the article above, in the Grand Sasso experiments they are detecting so many "anormalies" that they are starting to think that not all can be dark matter.

It's "fractal" like these systems within systems ... you have to wonder if there is an end to the mystery at all, always another layer of the onion to peel.

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It's "fractal" like these systems within systems ... you have to wonder if there is an end to the mystery at all, always another layer of the onion to peel.

Better that way,once we understand how it all works some goon is going to set off his own Big Bang just because he can...

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Really? So we cant see dark matter? So how do they know? Is this connected to the higgs boson thing?

it's kinda connected. Since they're looking if there is a link between the Higgs Boson and dark matter. But it could be there is no link.

First they thought that we couldn't measure the higgs cuz it decayed too fast into dark matter...if they Higgs Boson is confirmed they need to rethink that.

Also, if the Higgs is confirmed then supersymmetry can be further researched and this could lead to more clarity on dark matter, perhaps.

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What if these filaments can be used to travel from one part of the galaxy to the next, like a wormhole was theorized to do. This would mean we could travel between galaxies, solar systems, and planets to get where we need to go... interesting.... hmmm.

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Cool. they are saying it's the mass of dark matter that keeps our galaxy from spiraling out of control ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Do ya spose.. it's a factor in the stability of earth's orbit?? I've always wondered how the earth's orbit could be so stable while balancing precariously between gravity and centrifugal force ! I'm not forgetting that a body "at rest" tends to stay at rest, and while an orbiting planet can't be said to be exactly at rest, it would be in relation to another body SLAMMING into it. Look at the Moon.. done yet? ... notice the size of some of the impact zones and craters? Those impacts must have been quite forceful , and yet, the moon didn't budge. See what i'm trying to say? .. there must be more involved in the stability of earth's orbit , for example, than just a balancing act between gravity and centrifugal force?

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