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Saru

Hadron Collider to hunt for dark matter

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After discovering the Higgs-Boson, scientists at CERN are turning their attention to finding dark matter.

It might have only just found the elusive ''God particle'', but the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN laboratory, near Geneva, is to have a $A1. 82 billion upgrade at the end of the decade to investigate the mystery of dark matter.

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Posted (edited)

i was hoping they could put it to good use after finding the higgs boson

Edited by Ever Learning

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One would hope that is the case. LOL

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i was hoping they could put it to good use after finding the higgs boson

I find that to be a good use.....

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I just hope they don't end up blowing-up the earth in the process.

They say that can't happen. So I guess good luck in their endeavors.

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If at any time in the future we, meaning Earth people , become a space faring race we will need to know what the universe is made of and how it works. It would be nice to know of any dangers before we encounter them so as not to get killed do to our ignorance.

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I just hope they don't end up blowing-up the earth in the process.

They say that can't happen. So I guess good luck in their endeavors.

I think you're confusing "dark matter" and "anti-matter"....

Now to go on a tangent perhaps Dan Brown needs some new material for a new book...although his Robert Langdon is getting old... maybe his next girlfriend and co star will be Betty White.. :P

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Posted (edited)

and there was me thinking they hadn't finished with the Higgs-Boson yet...

Edited by Junior Chubb

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Posted (edited)

and there was me thinking they hadn't finished with the Higgs-Boson yet...

They haven't at all, just like you said.

The findings are merely acceptable indications that further analysis/experiments are warranted under scientific standards.

Edited by pallidin
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dang $1.8 billion. tats like my families money time 1000x

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There's no limit to what science can do and find new discoveries, like the Higgs-Boson particle to been so important to the development of all matter in the universe, they called it the "God" particle (over the top). :innocent: We should find what consists of dark matter, thus nothing will prove what made up "God" is matter out of...nothing. :whistle:

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I don't see the specifics of this news article looking through what Physicists are saying. I imaging they'll start trying to make WIMPs, and they've figured out a good way to detect them. Definitely a tremendously important piece of the puzzle (IMO as big if not bigger than Higgs). It might or might not provide insight into formation of spacetime curvatures (i.e. why space warps).

I want to stress once again that the Large Hadron Collider will make thousands of different experiments for thousands of different research projects. It did NOT get created just to find the 1 particle.

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dang $1.8 billion. tats like my families money time 1000x

Your family has $1.8 million? Must be nice! :P

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This is going to be really cool, especially due to the famous WIMP miracle.

My astronomy professor explained that astronomers and mathematicians/physicists rarely draw the same conclusions. In the case of dark matter, astronomical observations and theoretical mathematics drew the same conclusions for the percentage dark matter in galaxies. This was an amazing feat for astrophysics.

I am curious to see how this will work in the LHC. This is the first major thing that brings the LHC closer to what I regard as "real" astronomy. I think this is something that can really be related to humanity and our basic understanding of the big picture of the universe.

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and there was me thinking they hadn't finished with the Higgs-Boson yet...

My take on it is that they haven't. They've got something that looks like one but i may be something else entirely. All of the material coming out of CERN is of the sort that says "looks good but we're not positive."

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There's no limit to what science can do and find new discoveries, like the Higgs-Boson particle to been so important to the development of all matter in the universe, they called it the "God" particle (over the top). :innocent: We should find what consists of dark matter, thus nothing will prove what made up "God" is matter out of...nothing. :whistle:

No offense but...

Again. For the millionth time.

It's not called the godparticle for any reason other than Higgs wanted to call it the goddamned particle but his publishing agent recommended he change it to God Particle so it'd sell better. And they're only certain of having found the Higgs Boson to 99.999999 percent. That more certain than I am of being awake right now.

Anyway, hasn't the LHC been looking for dark matter? I guess the upgrade is just to improve the possibility of results.

To bad the collider here in the US was never built.

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I was thinking....

Discovering the 'God particle' could have been like discovering the Midi-Chlorin...

If that's the case we should not go looking for Dark Matter. ;)

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DARK matter - hmmmmmm.

have we fully figured out "light" yet.

"modern physics sees light as something that can be described sometimes with mathematics appropriate to one type of macroscopic metaphor (particles), and sometimes another macroscopic metaphor (water waves), but is actually something that cannot be fully imagined"

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