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markdohle

Study: Atheists Have Lowest 'Retention Rate'

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Posted (edited)

I always enjoyed it. I didn't quite get in trouble, but I often left with questions unanswered.

It was the same for me but only during religious studies at school.. Many unanswered questions..and the occasional angry teacher not liking the questions lol

Ha ha!

I was surprised they all found it boring though. All those stories of murder, mayhem and cataclysms - better than 'Transformers'.

Well Becky wouldn't understand much about that.she is only 6 yrrs old.... At her Sunday school they get the watered down version...lol

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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The results are not that surprising. Historically atheists remained in the closet for fear of social marginalization. That fear also extended to sharing their perpsepctive with their children. Luckily that is all changing.

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Indoctrination is super effective.

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Ooooo reeeeaaalllyyyy??!?!?

Yeah actually I was "raised an atheist". My mum didn't let me go to church with the rest of the school, and took me out of all religious classes.

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Indoctrination is super effective.

No it isn't ... my parents punished me extremely severely (three days in a row I had to kneel on gravel with bare knees) to force me to finish my catholic thingy .. I think it was called confirmation, the last dudda to become a good christian and I never did ... always refused, til this day

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Pretty much like my Becky...When they stopped giving sweets.. she lost interest lol

My kids like the toys in the cry room. I'll listen to the babies over the priest any day.

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i see this as good. 100 yrs ago, this most likely would have been a lower percentage. I see in the future, the retention rate as growing larger and larger :)

Times change

one generation at a time.

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No it isn't ... my parents punished me extremely severely (three days in a row I had to kneel on gravel with bare knees) to force me to finish my catholic thingy .. I think it was called confirmation, the last dudda to become a good christian and I never did ... always refused, til this day

Wow that IS child abuse. Did you tell them that was child abuse after you became an adult? I wouldn't let them spend time with a kid of mine without supervision.

I can only speak for my family. My Dad never pushed atheism on us. Mom sent us to Baptist Bible camp, I think she went through a Christian phase. I think it was mostly our friends who push Christianity. It is like any other peer pressure, you want to fit in. The Jesus movement was in full swing at the time. Churches were always having a contest to bring the most people to church. You go to help out your friends. When I was in college I took a class in world religions and that was the end of Christianity for me. I realized I really didn't believe what Christians believed and I moved on. If I had know about Paganism at the time I would have went with it, but I got busy and put spirituality on the back burner. With my own kids my goal was to cult proof them and taught them to think for themselves. One went on a Christian path and the other married a Native American and went with her path. As long as they're happy it's all good.

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Wow that IS child abuse. Did you tell them that was child abuse after you became an adult? I wouldn't let them spend time with a kid of mine without supervision.

I can only speak for my family. My Dad never pushed atheism on us. Mom sent us to Baptist Bible camp, I think she went through a Christian phase. I think it was mostly our friends who push Christianity. It is like any other peer pressure, you want to fit in. The Jesus movement was in full swing at the time. Churches were always having a contest to bring the most people to church. You go to help out your friends. When I was in college I took a class in world religions and that was the end of Christianity for me. I realized I really didn't believe what Christians believed and I moved on. If I had know about Paganism at the time I would have went with it, but I got busy and put spirituality on the back burner. With my own kids my goal was to cult proof them and taught them to think for themselves. One went on a Christian path and the other married a Native American and went with her path. As long as they're happy it's all good.

Congratulations on the way you raised your kids you seemed to have done a bang up job. I was never able to tell mother she was abusive because she still is and I'm caring for her. As soon as I was 18 I moved out of the hourse and there was even a time when I wanted to change name in order to avoid all contact with her. With the death of my siblings, I was forced to come to France and care for her. Ironic isn't it?

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It just shows people should be allowed to choose when they're old enough to do so. Baptism means nothing to a baby. And some people check out various religions before deciding. I studied a few and decided I wanted nothing to do with fairy tales.

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Posted (edited)

My kids like the toys in the cry room. I'll listen to the babies over the priest any day.

LOL @ the cry room.... I remember a catholic church in County Tyrone ( not that far from me ) they had a cry room..for all the mothers and their babies ...It was up on a balcony..sound proof glass ...I was just a child at the time, and I asked if I could go sit with the babies.Well, when I say I asked, I actually harped on and on asking lol .......My mother snarled at me saying-" If you don't hush up and be quiet, I'll put you into the brat room out the back, and you wont get back out again.".........I soon piped down...I believed there was a brat room at the back of the church... lol :P

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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It just shows people should be allowed to choose when they're old enough to do so. Baptism means nothing to a baby. And some people check out various religions before deciding. I studied a few and decided I wanted nothing to do with fairy tales.

You know, that's a dang good point.

Biblical baptism involved "those of age" not babies.

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You know, that's a dang good point.

Biblical baptism involved "those of age" not babies.

Which was still only seven years old. That age had to do with the average age of death among the youths at the time. If they made it to seven they had a better chance of living to an adult.

However, in the modern day the age should be somewhat in my opinion.

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i dont think the site is trusty cuz its ruled by christians and they are talking bout atheist soo...

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Doh this is going to be another stupid thread, athiests trolling and antagonizing christians, christians biting back, and so on and so forth...

Despite being a christian, I dont think the article holds much weight, it doesnt make me jump for joy. Its just a survey.

It is important to think for yourself, I believe its a God given gift we were given. I dont believe God wants us to be puppets.

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I was raised Catholic and started conversion to Judaism at 16 and now am part of a conservative Jewish congregation. I think my early exposure to the Catholic faith is what drove me to question it in the first place. It's really the silliest living religion other than Mormonism and Hinduism. My religion is silly in its own rite but humility is a big part of Judaism an so is taking things with a grain of salt. I think what drew me to Judaism is it never seeks to define G-d allowing for a personal idea of who and what G-d is. We only need a need G-d to exist, not to live. Heaven and hell are ideas, states of mind in the life we make. Cheers

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I was raised Catholic and started conversion to Judaism at 16 and now am part of a conservative Jewish congregation. I think my early exposure to the Catholic faith is what drove me to question it in the first place. It's really the silliest living religion other than Mormonism and Hinduism. My religion is silly in its own rite but humility is a big part of Judaism an so is taking things with a grain of salt. I think what drew me to Judaism is it never seeks to define G-d allowing for a personal idea of who and what G-d is. We only need a need G-d to exist, not to live. Heaven and hell are ideas, states of mind in the life we make. Cheers

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It's a typical desperate Christian propaganda non-story meant to reinforce the false assumption that being an 'atheist' is a form of 'religious grouping' in itself. Thats why it likes to use phrases like 'maintaining their beliefs' when discussing atheists (the entire pool of non religious people) as if they are 'converting' from one belief system to another.

Normally sensible people do a lot of dumb things.

Perhaps we should go easy on these 'converted atheists'? it is a 'first offence' after all! ;)

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I'm a member of a group that splintered off a group centered around atheist and secular parents where the intent is to help raise atheist or secular children.

As mentioned earlier in the thread, it's only recently that someone could both be an open atheist and have a community to be in and have help raising your kids. If trends continue, it'll be interesting to see where it might stabilize.

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Study: Atheists Have Lowest 'Retention Rate' Compared to Religious Groups

icn_close_white.gif

http://www.christian...s-groups-78029/

Wed, Jul. 11, 2012 Posted: 01:57 PM EDT

Those who grow up in an atheist household are least likely to maintain their beliefs about religion as adults, according to a study by Georgetown University's Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA).

Only about 30 percent of those who grow up in an atheist household remain atheists as adults. This "retention rate" was the lowest among the 20 separate categories in the study.

There were 1,387 atheists (weighted) in the survey. Four-hundred thirty-two weighted respondents said they were raised atheist. Of those, 131 self-identified as atheist.

"What these findings reflect is that in the U.S. atheists are for the most part 'made' as adults after being raised in another faith. It appears to be much more challenging to raise one's child as an atheist and have them maintain this identity in their life," Dr. Mark Gray wrote at CARA's blog.

Gray also noted that, "of those raised as atheists, 30% are now affiliated with a Protestant denomination, 10% are Catholic, 2% are Jewish, 1% are Mormon, and 1% are Pagan."

Jehovah's Witness, congregationalist and holiness churches had the next lowest retention rates at 37 percent, 37 percent and 32 percent, respectively. Thirty-eight percent of those who grew up with no particular religious faith or belief system remained that way.

Hindus had the highest retention rate at 84 percent, followed by Jews (76 percent), Muslims (76 percent), Greek Orthodox (73 percent), Mormons (70 percent) and Catholics (68 percent).

Baptists had the highest retention rate of the Protestant Christian categories at 60 percent, followed by Lutheran (59 percent) and Pentecostal (50 percent).

The study used the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life's 2008 U.S. Religious Landscape Survey. Gray noted that Pew's original report did not include some of the retention rates. Pew provided CARA with the original data sets for the study.

Copyright © Christianpost.com. All rights reserved.

Kids dont have biased minds because they dont have any issues yet.

They can see through the atheist parents and notice the negative impacts of being one on psychology.

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Kids dont have biased minds because they dont have any issues yet.

They can see through the atheist parents and notice the negative impacts of being one on psychology.

And these negative impacts would be...?

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And these negative impacts would be...?

Being left behind after the 'rapture' can have a negative psychological effect! ;)

Seriously though, I find it completely mystifying when so many religions rely on threats, guilt and general negativity to keep their 'flocks' on the straight and narrow that any religious person would dare to call atheism negative?

Shall we talk about 'original sin'?

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Shall we talk about 'original sin'?

Or even better, let's look at this:

"I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent."

Good ole' Timothy.

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Posted (edited)

Or even better, let's look at this:

"I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent."

Good ole' Timothy.

Timothy needed a slap lol He was most likely one who feared women and never got a word in edge ways :P

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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I'm a member of a group that splintered off a group centered around atheist and secular parents where the intent is to help raise atheist or secular children.

As mentioned earlier in the thread, it's only recently that someone could both be an open atheist and have a community to be in and have help raising your kids. If trends continue, it'll be interesting to see where it might stabilize.

If I may ask...what does that entail exactly?

I mean, if a child is raised to be religious the parents are accused of indoctrinating their children. Isn't that a different form of indoctrination?

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