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Elq

Deep sea Obilisk on Google Earth

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That's interesting,but it almost doesn't look real. If it is,It's kind of on the ring of fire,isn't it ?

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can you post a pic?

/insert bull**** excuse why i can't load the web page for myself here

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Although very strange, it still looks like a natural formation to me.

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Google Earth images have many glitches in them. This could be one of those. It almost looks as if the vertical scale was exaggerated for this one area, making a low, broad area look much taller and thinner than it really is. It would probably be worth inquiring of Google about this. They have been helpful in the past, in explaining puzzling features in their images. If Google has no satisfactory answer, this would certainly be worth further scrutiny. An examination of existing relief charts of the sea floor might turn up something.

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Almost certainly a glitch in the processing. Google Earth isn't an exact replica of the real earth you know.

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*insert random Cthulonic reference here*

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Posted (edited)

can you post a pic?

/insert bull**** excuse why i can't load the web page for myself here

post-18246-0-08892300-1343990082_thumb.g

post-18246-0-17433200-1343991611_thumb.g

.

Edited by Abramelin

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It's Harrold Holt!

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I don't see why something like that couldn't occur naturally, it looks like an old volcano is my first guess. I am sure that the cold ocean could have that affect on high velocity discharges from the earth's core, coupled with the effects of currents "weathering" the formation over large spans of time.

Many may be destroyed but there should be more than one example of such events still around imo.

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I don't see why something like that couldn't occur naturally, it looks like an old volcano is my first guess. I am sure that the cold ocean could have that affect on high velocity discharges from the earth's core, coupled with the effects of currents "weathering" the formation over large spans of time.

Many may be destroyed but there should be more than one example of such events still around imo.

Maybe it's nothing but a bleep.

Look at the dimensions here:

post-18246-0-16182500-1344161237_thumb.g

One such a pillar is not more than 150-200 meters wide, and at the same time 4800 meters high.

I think such a structure would break very quickly in any sea current.

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Maybe it's nothing but a bleep.

Look at the dimensions here:

post-18246-0-16182500-1344161237_thumb.g

One such a pillar is not more than 150-200 meters wide, and at the same time 4800 meters high.

I think such a structure would break very quickly in any sea current.

Good point hadn't thought about the dimensions, a bleep in their system is a likely possibility.

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I hope you will excuse my ignorance, but can anyone explain to me how Google Earth can obtain an image that looks like it was taken from the side rather than the top?

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Posted (edited)

I hope you will excuse my ignorance, but can anyone explain to me how Google Earth can obtain an image that looks like it was taken from the side rather than the top?

Maybe this is of help: http://en.wikipedia....ki/Contour_line

A satellite scans through water and makes an image made up of those contour lines (lines of same height). Software translates this 2D image into a 3D image.

topographic-map-simulator-02.jpg

Edited by Abramelin

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