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Harsh86_Patel

Underwater civilisation predating last iceage

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Then you've obviously never seen slabs of shale broken apart.

Actually no, it can't. It could be part of a civilization perhaps but it's never considered a civilization, in and of itself. Amongst other things a civilization requires several settlements.

cormac

I said you cant cut stone at 90 degree angles without tools.Shale breaking itself at 90 degrees and arraniging itself to look man made seems less probable.Why can't a single city which is completely diverse and isolated from other contemporary civilizations,having it's own individual culture,relegion,technology etc be considered a civilization on to itself.City is a physical dwelling place and civilization is distinctive people living in it.

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Harsh86, you want us the read the 'fluffy' stuff, but do you also click on the links to scientific papers posted here and elsewhere?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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About the "Bimini Road":

The Mystique of Beachrock

Eugene A. Shinn

Abstract

(...)

Adventurer and book writer Peter Thompkins later initiated and financed a

study during which the stones were extensively sampled with a newly

developed coring device. A summary of the expedition is provided by Shinn

(2004). The core borings, proved that the stones are composed of in-situ

natural beachrock that has been submerged by a combination of rising

Holocene sea level and erosion of underlying sand (Shinn 1978). Coring and

examination showed they rest directly on weathered Pleistocene limestone.

The Pleistocene limestone is coated by a reddish-brown calcrete, indicating

subaerial exposure preceding Holocene sedimentation and beachrock

formation. Later, McKusick and Shinn (1980) presented bulk 14C age data

from the cores. The dates ranging from 3510 to 2745 yrs BP indicate the

stones are much too young to be part of the mythological city/state of

Atlantis, which was said to be a legend 7ka when told to Plato 2ka.

-

Speculation and Future Research Possibilities

Alternative thinkers who believe the Bimini stones are anthropogenic

features often cite historic harbors in the Mediterranean as models for what

they believe occurred at Bimini during prehistoric or “Atlantian” times. The

sand spits and offshore barrier islands that migrate and form harbors in the

Persian Gulf may well indicate that some ancient harbors in the

Mediterranean developed geologically in a similar fashion. In the Persian

Gulf or Arabian Gulf, one can observe that curved spits have provided

natural sheltered harbors and that villages have been established because of

the shelter they provide. As the spits migrate laterally along the coast and the

harbors fill in, villages adjacent to the shallowing end of the harbor are

abandoned and rebuilt around the deepening newly forming harbor entrance.

Similar processes are likely to have occurred along the southern

Mediterranean shore, where the climate is arid and seawater salinity is

generally elevated. In areas where the harbors were especially important for

commerce, it would be reasonable to build structures around previously

formed natural beachrock-protected harbors. “J” shapes would be expected

in such areas. Because of the abundant ancient cultures in the Mediterranean

region, it would also be reasonable to expect an abundance of artifacts that

might lead archeologists, both conventional and alternative, to conclude that

the harbors were entirely man-made. Ancient Mediterranean cultures may

have simply taken advantage of and added to what nature had already

provided. The argument that the Bimini Road is anthropogenic because of

similarities with stones around ancient Mediterranean harbors may not be

valid.

----

Figure 5. Newly exposed submerged beachrock “road” on east side of

Loggerhead Key at Dry Tortugas. The “Loggerhead Road” was exposed by

Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and undermining of sand beneath the stones

caused the rock to subside approximately 1 m.

http://mgg.rsmas.mia.../shinnfinal.pdf

.

Edited by Abramelin

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As far as i know 90 degree angles cannot be cut without using tools.

The key part of that is "as far as I know."

Obviously, no one is expecting every poster here to know everything (the way I do) but the fact that you don't know something does not mean that that something isn't true.

Harte

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The key part of that is "as far as I know."

Obviously, no one is expecting every poster here to know everything (the way I do) but the fact that you don't know something does not mean that that something isn't true.

Harte

And, if I might add, having found a 90 degree angle among a multitude not measured is not indicative of anything intelligent at work, if enough rocks are broken sooner or later one will have 90 degrees. With or without tools.

It is something we call "probability".

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I said you cant cut stone at 90 degree angles without tools.Shale breaking itself at 90 degrees and arraniging itself to look man made seems less probable.Why can't a single city which is completely diverse and isolated from other contemporary civilizations,having it's own individual culture,relegion,technology etc be considered a civilization on to itself.City is a physical dwelling place and civilization is distinctive people living in it.

And you've been given an example of a material that does achieve 90 degree angles without the use of tools. That you wish to ignore it is irrelevant to the fact that it happens.

Because that's not the definition of a civilization. And no, the definition of a civilization is NOT "a distinctive people living in a city" as you are claiming. Your wanting it to be doesn't make it so.

cormac

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Maybe Athens did not exist under that name, but the area was inhabited for many millennia:

The oldest known human presence in Athens is the Cave of Schist, which has been dated to between the 11th and 7th millennium BC. Athens has been continuously inhabited for at least 7000 years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athens

But, I very much doubt that the Cave of Schist people mustered up tens or hundreds of thousands of citizen soldiers and marched out and beat the Continent of Atlantis and their supposedly more advanced professional army. The story reads like a Bible Story where Aaron or Moses does something and a handful of Israelites takes out ten times their number.

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As far as i know 90 degree angles cannot be cut without using tools.

But they do occur naturally.

AFAIK no stone can be cut without using tools. What else is there to use? Fingernails and teeth?

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But they do occur naturally.

AFAIK no stone can be cut without using tools. What else is there to use? Fingernails and teeth?

You can try a stomp dance until it gets tired of you :devil:

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You can try a stomp dance until it gets tired of you :devil:

With your feet? :w00t:

I think not.

Harte

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With your feet? :w00t:

I think not.

Harte

I said he can try, I prefer a pneumatic hammer.

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qoute-Some interesting reads for ruins around Bimini probably predating the last iceage............

Forget Bimini I `ve been going around with Gerg Little on this, by the study of the dirt there was not a culture there that predating the last ice age.,or 12,000 years ago. The so called stone ankors that he found were only fish holes

anchor1a.jpeg

Edited by docyabut2

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and please don`nt tell me it was all wash away:):):)

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But, I very much doubt that the Cave of Schist people mustered up tens or hundreds of thousands of citizen soldiers and marched out and beat the Continent of Atlantis and their supposedly more advanced professional army. The story reads like a Bible Story where Aaron or Moses does something and a handful of Israelites takes out ten times their number.

The Cave of Schist merely proves people did indeed live in that area long ago, and maybe most of the rest of those people lived in huts.

Plato's story could have been based on some vague folk mythology with a lot of added embellishment to make the "Athenians" look sophisticated.

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qoute-Some interesting reads for ruins around Bimini probably predating the last iceage............

Forget Bimini I `ve been going around with Gerg Little on this, by the study of the dirt there was not a culture there that predating the last ice age.,or 12,000 years ago. The so called stone ankors that he found were only fish holes

Absolutely right

If there was some ancient culture on Bimini, then wouldn't it show in the archaeology of Bimini?

Some beach rock just offshore doesn't make a wharf. If there was some kind of landing there, there would be all sorts of other ancient constructs in that area on dry land.

There's not.

Do you know that we are still not able to define the nature of Gravitational force.........newton only formulated a mathematical equation to measure it's effect believing it's there and is called gravity is much like a leap of faith (i.e like the centrifugal force,there are formulas to measure it but the force is considered to be a fictituos force i.e you can feel it but it's not supposed to be real)

I agree that a complete understanding of gravity has not been reached.

But your statement about it simply being a falling apple is quite the oversimplification of why Newton is famous and you are not, Wouldn't you agree?

After all, Newton pretty much single-handedly invented calculus, and didn't even think it was important enough to publish until the French got close to re-inventing it.

Regarding gravity, there are several theories that would completely explain it. The problem is, we don't know which one (if any) is correct.

When we nail down the Higgs Boson, it will go a long way toward completing gravitational theory.

i didn't mean to badmouth anyone but you have to acknowledge that mainstream historians/archealogists are under a lot of pressure from their peers whenever they come up with a new hypothesis,and this fear can affect their reporting in a negative way

Every mainstream scientist is desperately trying to prove previous theories to be incorrect. That's one definition of science itself.

So, no, there's no "peer pressure" to conform. The real peer pressure is to re-write the history/science books.

Like Newton and Einstein (among thousands of others) did.

Harte

Edited by Harte
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Absolutely right

If there was some ancient culture on Bimini, then wouldn't it show in the archaeology of Bimini?

Some beach rock just offshore doesn't make a wharf. If there was some kind of landing there, there would be all sorts of other ancient constructs in that area on dry land.

There's not.

I agree that a complete understanding of gravity has not been reached.

But your statement about it simply being a falling apple is quite the oversimplification of why Newton is famous and you are not, Wouldn't you agree?

After all, Newton pretty much single-handedly invented calculus, and didn't even think it was important enough to publish until the French got close to re-inventing it.

Regarding gravity, there are several theories that would completely explain it. The problem is, we don't know which one (if any) is correct.

When we nail down the Higgs Boson, it will go a long way toward completing gravitational theory.

Every mainstream scientist is desperately trying to prove previous theories to be incorrect. That's one definition of science itself.

So, no, there's no "peer pressure" to conform. The real peer pressure is to re-write the history/science books.

Like Newton and Einstein (among thousands of others) did.

Harte

Newton was also a known occultist and alchemist,thought i would just add that since we were talking about him...............also when i gave the falling apple example i didn't mean to say why i am not as famous but was just trying to highlight that truth and intelligence is not all about degrees...........Person who suggested Higgs Boson first was ridiculed by his peers.........Einstein was a petty clerk........... Edited by Harsh86_Patel

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Newton was also a known occultist and alchemist,thought i would just add that since we were talking about him

True. Newton was obsessed with the Bible code as well.

In that age, less was known about the nature of reality. See the "clockwork Universe" for example.

Person who suggested Higgs Boson first was ridiculed by his peers

please provide evidence for why you believe this to be true. You should probably read this before you try to do this.

.........Einstein was a petty clerk...........

Einstein worked for a living, and his position in the patent office was anything but petty.

You seem to think that things have always been the way they are today. There was no such thing as a college degree in the modern sense in Newton's day.

In Einstein's time, the system of grads working post-doc with mentor/professors didn't exist in Germany. It was pretty much a free for all. If you came up with something, you sent it to a scientific journal for publishing (or not.) You didn't get any job with any university if you hadn't done something like that.

Today, it's the other way around.

Higgs was already a respected professor of Physics when he proposed the method that allowed certain particles to have mass without violating known principles. It is very difficult and very deep work, and nobody ridiculed it, in spite of what you may believe or may have heard.

Harte

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Ohk i should rephrase any information or explanations on the ruins of these civilization which are in areas presently underwater.

LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior. You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature? I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means, you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious? Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there, I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!

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LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior. You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature? I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means, you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious? Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there, I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!

Sorry to hear that you don't like the fact there's no evidence for the things that I reply in response to. But that's not going to make said evidence appear just because you or anyone else wants it to be there. Show me the evidence and I can adjust my take on same accordingly, but I'll never say "Uh huh, yeah, your right" when the evidence clearly shows whomever I'm replying to is wrong.

cormac

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LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior. You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature? I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means, you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious? Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there, I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!

On the contrary you should question everything that Cormac says is a fact,you will be surprised by how much of it is assumptions.

Many mainstream facts are often not really facts especially when it comes to history which is usually based on consensus.

The demand for evidence is highly selective.

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How do we rate the views mentioned in an amazon kindle ebook with very similar theme - titled the 'The Guardians of Karma'

Rate this book as fiction. This quote from the only reviewer so far "While reading it I felt that the author must have an incredible imagination". But of course never take any review on amazon at face value when it comes to any contentious issues. Look at reviews for books by the alternaviks like Hancock and Bauval, clearly they are nearly all written by either their friends or fanboys, and many of the reviews for their books have remarkably similar styles of writing and sycophancy

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