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Harsh86_Patel

[Merged] Gobekli Tepe

327 posts in this topic

Thank you Harte. i think yourself, and kmt_sesh, have offered me explanations of the depicted scenes before... And i have read the ideas elsewhere.. that the "cone" represents either a fir or pine cone OR male flowers of the Date Palm.

It says in your linked book that the buckets contain water OR pollen. (depending on the stylized tree?)

So, it's either a scene of Purification.. or possibly, fertilization ?.. depending on the culture depicting it.

I've wondered if the scene may have started out more simply, as an act of collecting (something), but got more grandiose through repetition... as many ideas tend to do.

I just thought it would sound silly if i tried to explain or expound on it with my limited understanding. .. and it does :)

*

Edited by lightly

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I don't know .. i wish i knew what both scenes represent. What do you say, or think?

... i just noticed the V on the neck of the bird on the column ,above, that the puzzler posted.

Wikpedia : "The Assyrian Tree of Life was represented by a series of nodes and criss-crossing lines. It was apparently an important religious symbol, often attended to by eagle-headed gods and priests, or the King. Assyrilogists have not reached consensus as to the meaning of this symbol. It is multi-valent. The name "Tree of Life" has been attributed to it by modern scholarship; it is not used in the Assyrian sources. In fact, no textual evidence pertaining to the symbol is known to exist."

I have no idea what Men with feathers (bird men) do ? The basket, the pine cone, the bush or tree, I have no idea ?

Her you have the V-neck on a Gobekli Tepe statue

2zpuj5i.jpg

Edited by Ove

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but started out as the "seven Sages" of Sumerian myth - sent here by Anu to teach us) anointing a human figure, invariably a king.

Harte

post-86645-0-86672000-1349613528_thumb.j

Ok, someone take us back to Gobekli tepe......

* Ah, Ove already did . I remember you showing images of priestly V neck vestments in the

past..... reminiscent of wings .

Edited by lightly

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There are three sets of hands on the statue, one of the bird god, the hands of the mother who is giving birth and the last is of the baby`s.

GobT_totem2.jpg

And the baby is a bit large for a baby, and it looks like it's holding a pot or something.

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The temples of Gobekli Tepe no where resemble the steps, latters or mountain tops of the Tibetan sky-burials

Who said they should? It's about the idea of sky burials.

And how old are these Tibetan constructions anyway?

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I would say the temples were brithing centers, but for what reasons still can`nt figure out:)

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This article says,

Hauptmann's site also features a unique floor relief of a squatting woman--perhaps giving birth--

http://www.ancient-w...rkeygobekli.htm

Any one have any pictures of the floor reliefs.

The World's First Sheela-na-gig at the World's Oldest Temple

by LYDIA RUYLE

The motif of a female is found only in a drawing carved into a stone slab on the floor of the Löwenpfeilergebäude. The naked woman is depicted in a sitting position with straddled legs, obviously representing a sexual scene (Fig. 35) Schmidt sees similarities to figures known as “dejenoun” in the rock art of North Africa.”

--p. 80, Neolithic in Turkey:The Cradle of Civilization: New Discoveries, edited by Mehmet Ozdogan/Nezih Basgelen, 1999.

In 2006, I created a Goddess Icon Banner of the image and named her Göbekli Tepe. She has been flying around the world ever since. My banner description states:

Göbekli Tepe is a Neolithic Sheela-na-gig incised into stone on the floor of a rock cut temple which appeared to have ritual purposes.Two standing pillars with lions sculpted in relief protect one of the earliest known Sheelas. Göbekli Tepe, which means navel mountain, is in eastern Turkey near the source of the Euphrates River. Emmer wheat was domesticated in the area. All life comes from and returns to the mother.

Source: Incised rock. 9600 BCE. Göbekli Tepe. Near present day Urfa, Turkey

http://medusacoils.b...-at-worlds.html

Here she is:

post-18246-0-76809800-1349618767_thumb.j

And this is Sheela-na-gig:

https://www.google.nl/search?q=Sheela-na-gig&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=nl&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=lY1xUKPpHail0QXi54CoCQ&biw=1010&bih=582&sei=l41xULr7D6a_0QXOtICwBw

.

Edited by Abramelin

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It's interesting to wonder whether we jump to conclusions, sometimes. If, for example, we had discovered these pillars in north America, we would be calling them stone totem poles, most likely devoid of religious significance, but instead depicting a vertical pictogram of tribal or cultural history, and most likely used and associated with rituals and ceremonies. And the vultures would probably be interpreted in the same way as eagles atop "real" wooden totem poles are. It also seems the culture in Anatolia at this time were just as keen as carving out all the different animals around them as the Native Indians were.

However, assuming that the site was used for religious purposes, I'm wondering whether the pillars supported a wooden pillar for the laying out of bodies - a pillar that could have been removed (and the wood used for other purposes) when the site was buried ? I'd put money on the reason for the burial, as against destruction of the site, was simple too - the culture was moving on, spiritually and religiously, but out of respect for the "old", they refrained from destruction and interred the site as a form of preservation. I suspect therefore that even after "burial", the site maintained a great deal of significance for many years and continued to be visited by generations of people. I'd very much doubt 100% of the population involved at the time would instantly forget such an important site.

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It's interesting to wonder whether we jump to conclusions, sometimes. If, for example, we had discovered these pillars in north America, we would be calling them stone totem poles, most likely devoid of religious significance, but instead depicting a vertical pictogram of tribal or cultural history, and most likely used and associated with rituals and ceremonies. And the vultures would probably be interpreted in the same way as eagles atop "real" wooden totem poles are. It also seems the culture in Anatolia at this time were just as keen as carving out all the different animals around them as the Native Indians were.

However, assuming that the site was used for religious purposes, I'm wondering whether the pillars supported a wooden pillar for the laying out of bodies - a pillar that could have been removed (and the wood used for other purposes) when the site was buried ? I'd put money on the reason for the burial, as against destruction of the site, was simple too - the culture was moving on, spiritually and religiously, but out of respect for the "old", they refrained from destruction and interred the site as a form of preservation. I suspect therefore that even after "burial", the site maintained a great deal of significance for many years and continued to be visited by generations of people. I'd very much doubt 100% of the population involved at the time would instantly forget such an important site.

Interesting you bring up native Americans, the Haida and Kwakiutl and their totem poles.

You will often see a giant raven on top of these totem poles. Why? Because they considered Raven to be their Creator God.

110115896_c84d840c09_m.jpg

Could that not be the case for the Anatolians? That they had a vulture as their creator god? Together with a Mother Godess giving birth to humans?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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It's interesting to wonder whether we jump to conclusions, sometimes. If, for example, we had discovered these pillars in north America, we would be calling them stone totem poles, most likely devoid of religious significance, but instead depicting a vertical pictogram of tribal or cultural history, and most likely used and associated with rituals and ceremonies. And the vultures would probably be interpreted in the same way as eagles atop "real" wooden totem poles are. It also seems the culture in Anatolia at this time were just as keen as carving out all the different animals around them as the Native Indians were.

However, assuming that the site was used for religious purposes, I'm wondering whether the pillars supported a wooden pillar for the laying out of bodies - a pillar that could have been removed (and the wood used for other purposes) when the site was buried ? I'd put money on the reason for the burial, as against destruction of the site, was simple too - the culture was moving on, spiritually and religiously, but out of respect for the "old", they refrained from destruction and interred the site as a form of preservation. I suspect therefore that even after "burial", the site maintained a great deal of significance for many years and continued to be visited by generations of people. I'd very much doubt 100% of the population involved at the time would instantly forget such an important site.

Seems that everyone agree that the site has something to do with death and burial. But also the birth or rebirth elment is present in Gobekli Tepe.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=235334

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This is crazy. I keep humming a little Norman Greenbaum as I read the thread every time now......... cultural significance indeed.

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Interesting you bring up native Americans, the Haida and Kwakiutl and their totem poles.

You will often see a giant raven on top of these totem poles. Why? Because they considered Raven to be their Creator God.

110115896_c84d840c09_m.jpg

Could that not be the case for the Anatolians? That they had a vulture as their creator god? Together with a Mother Godess giving birth to humans?

.

Its the "bird man" not the Creator God. You can find "feathered men" in all cultures of the world,

bird-man-david-lee-thompson.jpg

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Its the "bird man" not the Creator God. You can find "feathered men" in all cultures of the world,

bird-man-david-lee-thompson.jpg

Then you should read about their belief: Raven brought forth the sun and the moon and water and fire.

It's their creator god alright.

++++++

EDIT:

The Raven plays a prominent role in the spiritual and social culture of Alaska's Native population. The Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, BellaBella, and Kwakiutl all viewed Raven as the creator of the world and bringer of daylight. The raven is also important in the creation myths of the Eskimo.

http://www.angelfire...song/Raven.html

.

Edited by Abramelin

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'Abramelin' qoute-

The World's First Sheela-na-gig at the World's Oldest Temple

by LYDIA RUYLE

The motif of a female is found only in a drawing carved into a stone slab on the floor of the Löwenpfeilergebäude. The naked woman is depicted in a sitting position with straddled legs, obviously representing a sexual scene (Fig. 35) Schmidt sees similarities to figures known as “dejenoun” in the rock art of North Africa.”

--p. 80, Neolithic in Turkey:The Cradle of Civilization: New Discoveries, edited by Mehmet Ozdogan/Nezih Basgelen, 1999.

In 2006, I created a Goddess Icon Banner of the image and named her Göbekli Tepe. She has been flying around the world ever since. My banner description states:

Göbekli Tepe is a Neolithic Sheela-na-gig incised into stone on the floor of a rock cut temple which appeared to have ritual purposes.Two standing pillars with lions sculpted in relief protect one of the earliest known Sheelas. Göbekli Tepe, which means navel mountain, is in eastern Turkey near the source of the Euphrates River. Emmer wheat was domesticated in the area. All life comes from and returns to the mother.

Source: Incised rock. 9600 BCE. Göbekli Tepe. Near present day Urfa, Turkey

http://medusacoils.b...-at-worlds.html

Here she is:

post-18246-0-76809800-1349618767_thumb.j

And this is Sheela-na-gig:

https://www.google.n...7D6a_0QXOtICwBw

.

Would like to see the actual pictures to make a judgement, Hauptmann's says a floor relief of a squatting woman--perhaps giving birth--

more then one women and there is the baby on the totam pole

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Would like to see the actual pictures to make a judgement, Hauptmann's says a floor relief of a squatting woman--perhaps giving birth--

more then one women and there is the baby on the totam pole

Then you'll have to buy the book the woman mentions on her blog. With a bit of luck it's online.

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Ove - careful with corvid arguments. Abramelin will have you for breakfast.... :innocent: (there's a rumour that he's one of them.....)

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Then you'll have to buy the book the woman mentions on her blog. With a bit of luck it's online.

The motif of a female is found only in a drawing carved into a stone slab on the floor of the Löwenpfeilergebäude. The naked woman is depicted in a sitting position with straddled legs, obviously representing a sexual scene (Fig. 35) Schmidt sees similarities to figures known as “dejenoun” in the rock art of North Africa.”

--p. 80,
Neolithic in Turkey:The Cradle of Civilization: New Discoveries, edited by Mehmet Ozdogan/Nezih Basgelen, 1999.

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This is crazy. I keep humming a little Norman Greenbaum as I read the thread every time now......... cultural significance indeed.

"Spirit in the Sky"....

Read this:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=227240&st=1290#entry4491218

.

Edited by Abramelin

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This is one of my favorrites. it is one-piece construction.

http://www.google.co...r:19,s:36,i:254

this one here - I get the impression it is a pregnant woman with her hands around her belly-bulge. great art.

http://www.google.co...r:15,s:15,i:173

Mother goddess symbol of fertility and reproduction usually depicted with voluptious breast and wide hips and a fat belly,doesn't necessary have to be a pregnant lady.Similar imagery of the birth goddess was wide spread through out central asia and Eastern Europe.

If anything i guess the Imagery indicates cultural continuity.

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Ove, Harshe Patel, thanks

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With 3 opened Gobekli Tepe thread I dont know where to put this. Maybe someone mention it before.

Balearic slingers become well known in Punic Wars when thy were under Hannibal. Although far as I know they didnt been crucial in one of my favpurite battles at Cannea. Anyway those precise slingers came from Balearic Islands. They ancestors were Talaiots. Talaiotic culture emerged during Iron age although no one know exactly when. As I understand from 2000-1000 BC. Some link them with Sardinian nuraghes. Talaiots built many walls, towers, pyramid like tombs and carved caves to made them look like realy nice place. Anyway, reason why Im telling all this is that on Balearic Island we can find similarites with Gobekli Tepe such as „T“ shape monoliths.

9rqg5l.jpg

o6a6vn.jpg

1pdnxs.jpg

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Just one small thing: the talaiots are the buildings and not the people.

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