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Still Waters

Venomous spiders found in UK family's home

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A Swindon man had a shock when he discovered a nest of 60 venomous spiders while clearing out a kitchen cupboard.

Father-of-one Ashley Murtough, 26, and his partner Carla Ellis found the false widow spiders, which are relatives of the black widow, in their Penhill home.

The spider is not deadly but can deliver a venomous bite.

Mr Murtough said one bit his mother on her finger which quickly swelled up and filled with pus.

He said: "She had to go and have antibiotics and you could start to see the venom travelling up her veins.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...tshire-19420894

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One of the miracles of global warming (or climate change or call it what you want), critters that only had a survival chance in Africa will more and more conquest Europe and critters that only had a chance in central America will more and more conquer the South and the North of the continent.

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Posted (edited)

Wish I never read this.

I swear I seen one in my house last week and I'll admit that I killed it straight away.

I only let certain spiders stay in my house, mostly daddy long legs spiders to take of flies etc. Everything else Is trapped and put outside. Well except form this one garden spider who has made a web outside my bedroom window, I'm fond of garden spiders though. He came in the house the other day and I jsut trapped him and put him back out. lol (he is outside, but in my space if you know what I mean)

I just don't like the thought of venomous spiders in my house and I killed it because I didn't want it biting someone if I put it outside. I would have felt bad.

Edited by Coffey
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Ah...we dont get them types up in ye olde frozen north... :P ...

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The main problem around here is Fiddlebacks (Brown Recluses)... Nasty, nasty spiders...

800px-Brown-recluse-coin-edit.jpg

Thankfully they are not overly aggressive, but their bite can easily cause a large patch of necrosis (dead skin tissue) and bite victims frequently have deep 'divots' in their bodies where they were bitten...

In 2001 there were over 2,000 found in one house in Kansas... (No family member had been bitten though)...

Normally, they hide in clothing, and will bite you when you put the shirt or pants on...

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The main problem around here is Fiddlebacks (Brown Recluses)... Nasty, nasty spiders...

Normally, they hide in clothing, and will bite you when you put the shirt or pants on...

What about underwear? Please tell me nobody has been bitten in the sensitive area?! :passifier:

Ah...we dont get them types up in ye olde frozen north... :P ...

Seriously considering moving back up to Scotland.... lol

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This makes the news in the UK? Come to my house I've got 100's of Redbacks and that's just in the roof!

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Posted (edited)

This makes the news in the UK? Come to my house I've got 100's of Redbacks and that's just in the roof!

Aye...and you can keep them too,along with your snakes and your sharks...we have ferocious badgers that we never see and thats enough for us!

edit to add...and i forgot your bloody crocodiles....jees...is there anything that doesnt want to kill you in Oz...?.

Edited by BrianPotter
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Aye...and you can keep them too,along with your snakes and your sharks...we have ferocious badgers that we never see and thats enough for us!

edit to add...and i forgot your bloody crocodiles....jees...is there anything that doesnt want to kill you in Oz...?.

Don't forget good ol' emus and kangaroos, they've killed people before too. Oh and you all know about dingoes...

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Don't forget good ol' emus and kangaroos, they've killed people before too. Oh and you all know about dingoes...

Bloody hell...!!...id rather take my chances with the chavs anyday. :P .

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What about underwear? Please tell me nobody has been bitten in the sensitive area?! :passifier:

Seriously considering moving back up to Scotland.... lol

I'm sure someone has been, just no one I've ever heard about...

This is a typical Brown Recluse Spider bite...

WARNING..... GRAPHIC... ICKY... PHOTO....

brown_recluse_spider_bite1.jpg

For those interested this link takes you to a photo log of a persons treatment over several months for a single recluse bite on his upper leg.... 1 bite a 5" diameter patch needing skin grafting... and another for a bite on the arm...

http://www.emedicinehealth.com/spider_bite_brown_recluse_spider_bite/page11_em.htm

(Mods... I hope the above photo does not violate the posting rules for "graphicness"... If so, please delete and accept my appologies....)

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Scary, I wouldn't want those in my house :(

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I'm sure someone has been, just no one I've ever heard about...

This is a typical Brown Recluse Spider bite...

For those interested this link takes you to a photo log of a persons treatment over several months for a single recluse bite on his upper leg.... 1 bite a 5" diameter patch needing skin grafting... and another for a bite on the arm...

http://www.emedicine...e/page11_em.htm

I've seen that image before, it's nasty.

The link you posted was interesting... I don't understand how people can live alongside them. :no:

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I've seen that image before, it's nasty.

The link you posted was interesting... I don't understand how people can live alongside them. :no:

Pretty much we don't... Kill on sight for the most part..

Now Wolf Spiders are another matter... Wolf spiders are our friends as they hunt and kill other spiders and generally don't mess with people...

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Pretty much we don't... Kill on sight for the most part..

Now Wolf Spiders are another matter... Wolf spiders are our friends as they hunt and kill other spiders and generally don't mess with people...

Ah right, should have guessed that. lol

I heard wolf spiders are venomous over there?

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Ah right, should have guessed that. lol

I heard wolf spiders are venomous over there?

Mildly venomous, a few minutes of discomfort - no recorded cases of any thing serious...

You can actually pick up a wolf spider (slowly) and handle it and it won't attack you... Tonight I will upload a video of a lady holding a momma wolf spider with it's babies on its back...

Edited by Taun
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A cool thing about Wolf Spiders... if you go outside at night and shine your flashlight (torch for you Brits) at the grass, you can see little green lights looking back at you...

Wolf Spider's have eight eyes, two of which are very large (for its size) and highly reflective... They reflect green light...

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A cool thing about Wolf Spiders... if you go outside at night and shine your flashlight (torch for you Brits) at the grass, you can see little green lights looking back at you...

Wolf Spider's have eight eyes, two of which are very large (for its size) and highly reflective... They reflect green light...

That sounds pretty fab, I'd like to see that.

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That sounds pretty fab, I'd like to see that.

I did a search on Wolf Spiders and their habitat is everywhere on Earth except for Antartica and parts of Greenland... You probably have a sub-species of them right where you live...

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This is the video I was going to post last night (but forgot...) It is a momma Wolf Spider and her babies...

[media=]

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Wolf spiders are very fast - they have been clocked moving at 2 feet (60 cm?) per second which is pretty fast, since they are only 1 to 2 inches (25 - 50 mm) in size themselves...

Edited by Taun

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Wolf Spiders are awesome. We have numerous species here in the States including the Giant Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna Carolinensis)

I thought I had read somewhere long ago that England had an isolated introduced population of Latrodectus tredecimguttatus (mediterranean black widow) or maybe it was the cosmopolitan Latrodectus geometricus (brown widow). Strange things happened to memory recall over time. Anyways if that is indeed true then these would be the most venomous spiders in England. Now I am not sure anymore.

Speaking of black widows check out these two exotic species of black widow:

Latrodectus Ex Laos (it has painted flames)

latrodectussplaos.jpg

exlaosts.jpg

Latrodectus corallinus from Argentina

5934702790_30641ea872_z.jpg

Latrodectus curacaviensis from Lesser Antilles, South America

Latrodectus+curacaviensis+01.jpg

black-widow-spider-animal-image-84080924.jpg

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There's this widow up at where I work. My boss and I have kept a pretty close eye on her and have decided will let her stay cause she's pretty out in the open and all. Since she's shown up, she's caught a bunch of roaches in her web. We just watch her web to make sure she's not gonna make a egg case or anything. It's pretty cool to watch her move about her cobweb.

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There's this widow up at where I work. My boss and I have kept a pretty close eye on her and have decided will let her stay cause she's pretty out in the open and all. Since she's shown up, she's caught a bunch of roaches in her web. We just watch her web to make sure she's not gonna make a egg case or anything. It's pretty cool to watch her move about her cobweb.

General rule of thumb, black widows leave people alone if people leave them alone. Widows are pretty much confined to their cobwebs their whole lives. They are not a wandering species of spider by nature.

Back to the subject of your widow, dont be surprised if she is spotted guarding an eggsack eventually when a tiny harmless male does comes along. Once the young hatch and are ready to leave home, they will parachute on the wind to find a home of their own.

But yeah, she isnt going to hurt anybody. It is widows in dark and confined spaces that present a potential danger like in garages, attics, basements, inside the home, lawn furniture, outhouses, etc.

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