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Still Waters

Last of Scottish dialect's speakers dies

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The last native speaker of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect has died.

Retired engineer Bobby Hogg, 92, was the last person who was still fluent in the dialect used in parts of the Black Isle, near Inverness.

His younger brother Gordon was also a native speaker. He died in April last year aged 86.

The dialect is believed to have arrived in the area with fishing families that moved north from the Firth of Forth in 15th and 16th centuries.

The families were thought to be the descendants of Norse and Dutch fishermen.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-19802616

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Am imagining St Peter saying, "Thank God for that... I never knew what the Hell those guys were saying".

(only jokin.. I know it's sad)

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Posted (edited)

*kicks El's shin for that remark* :P:P:P

I find it a bit sad when dialects die out because no one else wants to learn it. :(

Edited by Lady Kasey
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What a shame that no one wanted to learn it and pass it down.

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The last native speaker of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect has died.

Retired engineer Bobby Hogg, 92, was the last person who was still fluent in the dialect used in parts of the Black Isle, near Inverness.

His younger brother Gordon was also a native speaker. He died in April last year aged 86.

The dialect is believed to have arrived in the area with fishing families that moved north from the Firth of Forth in 15th and 16th centuries.

The families were thought to be the descendants of Norse and Dutch fishermen.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-19802616

"Included was the word "tumblers" for dolphins and harbour porpoises and phrases such as "At now kucka" for a friendly greeting."

We here in the Netherlands still use the word "tuimelaars" as a word for dolphins, and it translates into 'tumblers'.

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"Included was the word "tumblers" for dolphins and harbour porpoises and phrases such as "At now kucka" for a friendly greeting."

We here in the Netherlands still use the word "tuimelaars" as a word for dolphins, and it translates into 'tumblers'.

I have no idea what that might literally mean... Is "At now Kucka" a derivative of Dutch?

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Weird, sounds like a mix between Peterhead and fraserburgh etc Fishermen and Dutch. lol

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I had about as much success understanding that accent as I did with this 'Newfie Joke' I found on youtube.

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I have no idea what that might literally mean... Is "At now Kucka" a derivative of Dutch?

Maybe that's Norse?

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