Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
joc

Jump from Edge of Space

47 posts in this topic

I have to relate the skydivers mantra (which may have been given in relation to the mountain climber who was onced asked "Why do it?" - "Because it was there.")

Man small,

Why fall?

Skies call,

That's all.

- anonymous

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a TV either, "You are not alone."

According to my brother, who watched it live, Felix Baumgartner only had about 2,500 jumps, which is not a lot in the 'jumping world'. My brother has about 1,700 and has probably trained about the same number of people 'how to jump'. Felix's relative lack of experience, is what truly amazes my brother.

He told me that for a brief period when Felix went into a horizontal spin (way better than a vertical spin) he felt his blood turn 'icy'. Felix, of course recovered from that and said to his ground crew, after they started trying to contact him, "**** off, I'm a bit busy now" or "**** off, I'm a bit dizzy now". Either would have been appropriate. :)

What amazed him was that their was no drogue or pilot chute involved (to slow down and stabilize him). I'm curious as to what his speed was when he pulled his chute.

There actually was a chute that would have been deployed automatically if his spin had reached a critical level. He also had the option to deploy the chute if he felt he needed to...but he said he didn't want to do that because he was trying to break the sound barrier. I don't know what his speed was when he deployed the shoot, but his speed at the fastest point was Mach 1.24, or 833.9 mph.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There actually was a chute that would have been deployed automatically if his spin had reached a critical level. He also had the option to deploy the chute if he felt he needed to...but he said he didn't want to do that because he was trying to break the sound barrier. I don't know what his speed was when he deployed the shoot, but his speed at the fastest point was Mach 1.24, or 833.9 mph.

"He said he didn't want to do that because he was trying to break the sound barrier." No guaranteed, but AFTER he reached the sound barrier, let out the drogue chute.

Just now, I heard him on the radio, he said "I stuck one hand out, pulled one hand in..." while describing the horizontal spin. It was the ultimate hokeypokey.

He and Kittinger will be featured in a movie one day, "The Men Who Fell To Earth."

Edit: "I am at 103,000 feet, looking out over a very beautiful, beautiful world." - August 16, 1960, Joseph Kittinger

Edited by Likely Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I predict that, 45 years from now, a new young daredevil will be aided by an aged Felix Baumgartner that will jump and survive from 150,000 feet.

And that kid is being born... ohhh, about... NOW!

Edited by Likely Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I predict that, 45 years from now, a new young daredevil will be aided by an aged Felix Baumgartner that will jump and survive from 150,000 feet.

And that kid is being born... ohhh, about... NOW!

Think Balloon pops at 130,000

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think Balloon pops at 130,000

Not necessarily at 130,000 feet, but when the balloon rises as far as it can, and the helium expands beyond the capability of the balloon to contain it....burst!

I was very concerned about that, even though the capsule had a parachute...crash landing in the desert would not be good.

That being said though, I would think it might be possible to use a much larger balloon...but then again...you know, that one was 700 feet tall and it seemed like the real challenge was getting it off with no wind at that height. So, a balloon of say, 900 feet, would be much more difficult. No, I think that Felix's record will never be broken. Why even try? The next challenge will be freefalling from...outer space...without burning up. (Think Iron Man)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched this live and it was riveting, its only a shame he didn't get the record for longest freefall :tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a TV either, "You are not alone."

According to my brother, who watched it live, Felix Baumgartner only had about 2,500 jumps, which is not a lot in the 'jumping world'. My brother has about 1,700 and has probably trained about the same number of people 'how to jump'. Felix's relative lack of experience, is what truly amazes my brother.

He told me that for a brief period when Felix went into a horizontal spin (way better than a vertical spin) he felt his blood turn 'icy'. Felix, of course recovered from that and said to his ground crew, after they started trying to contact him, "**** off, I'm a bit busy now" or "**** off, I'm a bit dizzy now". Either would have been appropriate. :)

What amazed him was that their was no drogue or pilot chute involved (to slow down and stabilize him). I'm curious as to what his speed was when he pulled his chute.

He went into a vertical spin for a few seconds though, right about at the end of the tumbling session. It was brief though, thankfully. What a pro, at those speeds, that's not easy. Gosh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched it live and the highest speed he was clocked at was 738 , how did he get up to 834 reported a few hours later? Also, even at 128K(+)ft. there was a crystal clear shot of the ballon from below, so why was the video of his initial fall so grainy and out of focus? And why didn't they show any video from the cameras mounted on him?

Edited by praetorian-legio XIII

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched it live and the highest speed he was clocked at was 738 , how did he get up to 834 reported a few hours later? Also, even at 128K(+)ft. there was a crystal clear shot of the ballon from below, so why was the video of his initial fall so grainy and out of focus? And why didn't they show any video from the cameras mounted on him?

I remember seeing "estimated speed" when they were showing it live. I could be mistaken, but I believe that is why there is a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched it live and the highest speed he was clocked at was 738 , how did he get up to 834 reported a few hours later? Also, even at 128K(+)ft. there was a crystal clear shot of the ballon from below, so why was the video of his initial fall so grainy and out of focus? And why didn't they show any video from the cameras mounted on him?

The cameras mounted on him were not live streaming. They were recording, but not able to transmit. BBC/NG are compiling the footage for a film that will be released in November, I think. Also, the grainy footage was shot in Infra Red, so the image will be distorted by motion and his changing temperature in freefall.

ETA: Corrected spelling

Edited by Maestro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! HE LIVED! Amazing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice he say's he's never jumping again, so maybe he didn't enjoy it....it must have been terrifying. My heart does a flip flop when I fall off the kerb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some day we will have people jump from orbit to the ground ! JMO. :tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't even fathom free falling like that. I always thought it may be fun, but I think id pass out lol.. But those camera shots are awesome!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a great leap of faith into new ideas and a New Way to look at ourselfs ! I would do it in a heart beat !

:tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very very cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice he say's he's never jumping again, so maybe he didn't enjoy it....it must have been terrifying. My heart does a flip flop when I fall off the kerb.

Imagine tasting the sweetest sugar. Would you feel like returning to the classic one?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AWESOME !!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only imagine what the world looked like to him at that altitude. I would give anything to see the earth from top down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if they try this from the ISS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if they try this from the ISS.

Jumping from orbit would be a whole different ball game.

Firstly, if you just stepped out of the air lock you wouldn't fall, you just remain in orbit with the ISS, so you would need to take some sort of retro-rocket to slow you down enough so that you dropped out of orbit.

The next problem is speed, from orbit you would hit the top of the atmosphere at over 17,000 mph. Lots of thing do this, they are called meteors. So you would also need to take some sort of heat shield other wise you would just burn up.

People have suggested jumping from orbit before, even suggesting it as a way to return from a spacecraft left marooned in orbit, but it would be far more difficult and dangerous than even Baumgartner's amazing jump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.