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Big Bad Voodoo

Sumerian astronomical knowledge

54 posts in this topic

Of course the people who depicted such a system of a star and planets knew the earth was round.

There should not be any doubts about it.

tumblr_lef2paMLi41qesympo1_500.jpg

Edited by LRW

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Of course the people who depicted such a system of a star and planets knew the earth was round.

There should not be any doubts about it.

tumblr_lef2paMLi41qesympo1_500.jpg

If that was actually the solar system, then I'd tend to agree.

However, what's shown there is an important star - likely Venus (Ishtar) surrounded by less important stars (probably some constellation that Venus is passing through.)

Seals like that one often include date stamps, which is what that depiction actually is. It indicates the time of year of the transaction recorded by the cylinder seal. Or, possibly, the time of year that the vignette of the two standing figures and the seated figure (a god, you can tell by his "flounced" clothing and the style of his hat) supposedly took place.

While the star in the seal admittedly has only six points, it still matches the iconography for Venus quite well. The iconography itself was often used for any star/planet that was being emphasized in the pic, not just Venus, and the depictions of stars usually had eight points, but there are many examples of those with six points and even seven points. That's the convention they used - there simply no question about it, and if you want to claim otherwise, you'll need to back it up (somehow) with (at least) textual evidence to the contrary.

Here's how they depicted Venus:

sunmoonstar.jpg

That's Venus at left, with the Moon in the center and the Sun at right. Please note - since the seal you posted is only a few inches long, finer details such as the lines often included in the "rays" coming from the star that you can see above in the Venus icon would be impractical to replicate on such a small thing (and unnecessary in any event.)

Like I stated, other stars/planets were depicted in a similar way to that of Venus:

sealxiiigpleaides.jpg

The above seal, however, is not Sumerian. IIRC, it's Assyrian. You can tell by the shape of the winged disk at left. That is, if I'm remembering the iconography correctly, and I'm likely to be wrong here, not being an expert. The winged disk icon evolved over the several centuries it was used in Mesopotamia.

At any rate, you can see eight-pointed stars at left and round, plain stars at right in this seal. The round stars represent the Pleiades in this case.

Note in my first pic that the Sun is depicted as a disk (of course.) See the wavy lines the Sun is emitting? Sumerians depict the Sun in that way in every single depiction they made (that we've found.)

Here's another one of the Sun:

sundiskclose.jpg

And sketched here for more clarity:

sundiskblack168.jpg

Obviously, the star in the center of the depiction is not the Sumerian representation of the Sun.

The seal itself is the record of a transaction between a mason/bricklayer and some person named Dubsiga. We know this from the writing on the seal.

Harte

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i would have to agree that the playing pieces represent the 7 major spheres in the heavens also represented as our 7 chakras. for more info on how all religion is based on movements of the planets in our solar system check out santos bonaccis vid on youtube, the holy science of astrology

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The Gaulish Coligny calendar was found in Coligny, Ain, France (46°23′N 5°21′E) near Lyon in 1897, along with the head of a bronze statue of a youthful male figure. It is a lunisolar calendar. It is now held at the Gallo-Roman Museum of Lyon.

It was engraved on a bronze tablet, preserved in 73 fragments, that originally was 1.48 m wide and 0.9 m high (Lambert p. 111) or approximately 5 feet (1.5 m) wide by 3½ feet in height.[1] Based on the style of lettering and the accompanying objects, it probably dates to the end of the 2nd century AD.[2][3] It is written in Latin inscriptional capitals and is in the Gaulish language (Duval & Pinault). The restored tablet contains sixteen vertical columns, with 62 months distributed over five years.

wiki
The Coligny Calendar (a portion of which is shown to the right) is an ancient Celtic solar/lunar ritual calendar which was discovered in Coligny France. It dates to a time when the Romans and Celts coexisted, and heavily influenced each other. The Calendar that was found uses roman numerals for instance. However, the actual format of the calendar may be much older, as the rock engraving below suggests.

The Coligny Calendar page

you can also download the Windows Coligny Calendar Program

THE CALENDAR OF COLIGNY.

In November of 1897 a Monsieur Roux made a remarkable archaeological discovery in a field north of Coligny, Ain, France. He came across a buried statue of the Roman deity, Mars and with it the badly broken up remains of what had once been a large bronze plaque. There were in the vicinity of 153 individual fragments associated with the plaque, most of which bore some form of writing, accompanied by calibration marks and numerical values.

The writing itself, although inscribed by use of Roman letters and numbers, was in an early language of the Gaul's and vaguely recognizable as terminology used by the Druids to indicate moon phases or fests.

here

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