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camochick

Orbs in photos

41 posts in this topic

OP, talk to someone who knows forums, computers, imaging and get them to help.. While reduced images will help a little, the best way to offer your images for analysis is to post them somewhere like a photo hosting site, where they can be at full resolution and intact (which means they include information recorded when they were taken - 'exif').

Another way is to zip the images (select them, right click, Send to.. Compressed ZIP file or similar) and send them by email to someone who might offer to analyse them for you.

I'm happy to, but you should be aware that I am known here as a skeptic..... :D I can PM you an email address if you want.

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ZIP is handy for sending a whole bunch of photos without having to attach multiple files to an email, but because JPEG is a highly optimized lossy compression algorithm, you really don't gain anything (a few % in my experience at most) in the sense of file compression by trying to zip JPEGs.

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I am a believer, and I know some people aren't, so there's no need to call me crazy, you can just think it.

Many orbs are flying insects, 'features' of the camera, or tricks of the light. Discount those, and the many borderline cases, and I find I am left with a hard core of genuine orbs. I like to think I can tell which is which.

What is less easily explained away by sceptics is the 'stage up' from an orb, which I have heard called a 'veil'. Instead of a symmetrical round blob, it is a loose glowing mesh, like the shape of a twisting hand, with a definite 3rd dimension to it. Much more interesting!

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I am a believer, and I know some people aren't, so there's no need to call me crazy, you can just think it.
Ok.
Many orbs are flying insects, 'features' of the camera, or tricks of the light. Discount those, and the many borderline cases, and I find I am left with a hard core of genuine orbs. I like to think I can tell which is which.
Examples of such "genuine" orbs and methodology of how you separate the "genuine" orbs from the others?
What is less easily explained away by sceptics is the 'stage up' from an orb, which I have heard called a 'veil'. Instead of a symmetrical round blob, it is a loose glowing mesh, like the shape of a twisting hand, with a definite 3rd dimension to it. Much more interesting!

Again, examples of what you are talking about?

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Examples of such "genuine" orbs and methodology of how you separate the "genuine" orbs from the others?

Again, examples of what you are talking about?

Obviously, spotting genuine orbs is very subjective.

What is easier to show you is the 'veil'.

See 4:51 (bottom right of the screen) and 5:39.

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Obviously, spotting genuine orbs is very subjective.

What is easier to show you is the 'veil'.

See 4:51 (bottom right of the screen) and 5:39.

As I have said many times; disable the camera's flash and focus assist and/or IR illumination and then post images/footage of the artefacts that did not require illumination by/from the camera.

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You're just taking pictures of ordinary stuff floating in the air.

Or maybe dead spirits are aggravating my allergies during the spring.

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As I have said many times; disable the camera's flash and focus assist and/or IR illumination and then post images/footage of the artefacts that did not require illumination by/from the camera.

Hi, Oppono Astos,

Please tell me more about your theory.

I shot one of these 'veils' in bright daylight, in a disused and isolated Saxon church, using a Canon Ixus 75 compact.

The camera was unmanned, sitting near the altar, pointing towards the back of the church. There was no illumination from the camera, and no passing vehicular or pedestrian traffic. The veil moved along the wall at the far end of the church, then shrank to an orb, then disappeared.

Unfortunately, I can't post the video online, but what I recorded looked very similar (to start with) to that shown at 4:51 in the youtube clip above.

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Hi, Oppono Astos,

Please tell me more about your theory.

I shot one of these 'veils' in bright daylight, in a disused and isolated Saxon church, using a Canon Ixus 75 compact.

The camera was unmanned, sitting near the altar, pointing towards the back of the church. There was no illumination from the camera, and no passing vehicular or pedestrian traffic. The veil moved along the wall at the far end of the church, then shrank to an orb, then disappeared.

Unfortunately, I can't post the video online, but what I recorded looked very similar (to start with) to that shown at 4:51 in the youtube clip above.

Rather convenient not being able to post said video... Did you disable the camera's focus assist; if not the camera was still capable of emitting illumination onto the scene in front. Balls or other forms of 'energy' should not need camera illumination to make them visible.

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Rather convenient not being able to post said video... Did you disable the camera's focus assist; if not the camera was still capable of emitting illumination onto the scene in front. Balls or other forms of 'energy' should not need camera illumination to make them visible.

It is not 'convenient' that I can't post the video — I find it inconvenient, but I don't have consent.

Yes, the focus assist would have been on, but the focus was at infinity at the time.

So, what are you saying caused the 'veil'?

(I am broadly knowledgeable in electronics, so there is no need to dumb down for my consumption)

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A minor quibble - the illumination does not have to be from the camera..

To acute - I'm a little puzzled - it's a video, it's not yours.. yet you are verifying the focus setting? How? And whether focused at infinity or anything closer, for an object to be blurred simply requires it not to be within the depth of field (or hyperfocal range).

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A minor quibble - the illumination does not have to be from the camera..

To acute - I'm a little puzzled - it's a video, it's not yours.. yet you are verifying the focus setting? How? And whether focused at infinity or anything closer, for an object to be blurred simply requires it not to be within the depth of field (or hyperfocal range).

Hello Chrizs.

The camera was mine, the video is mine, but there's a person on the video who doesn't want it put online, and I'm happy to respect their wish.

I am not an expert in photography, but I suspect the camera's focus was at infinity. Either way, the camera was shooting at the far wall in the church, and the focus didn't alter throughout.

Thinking about it.... I'm not sure if there is a Focus Assist on the Ixus 75. I don't have the camera anymore, and I can't find a mention of it in the user manual. You must know a lot more about this than me!

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Acute - Ok, understood. While I'm not an expert on the Ixus75, I believe it is a small compact and very likely has simple auto-focus only when videoing - it's very rare for cameras of that type to offer any advanced functions.

So the only way to estimate the focus is by examining the footage... If it was a daylight scene there may have been rays of sunlight through stained glass windows or other lighting that may have caused a nearby bug or dust mote to be illuminated. Can't say much more without seeing it.

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Acute - Ok, understood. While I'm not an expert on the Ixus75, I believe it is a small compact and very likely has simple auto-focus only when videoing - it's very rare for cameras of that type to offer any advanced functions.

So the only way to estimate the focus is by examining the footage... If it was a daylight scene there may have been rays of sunlight through stained glass windows or other lighting that may have caused a nearby bug or dust mote to be illuminated. Can't say much more without seeing it.

Thank you for your comments.

I have learned a valuable lesson on this thread —

Don't mention a video you can't post!

We live and learn.

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Ords suck, paranormal investigators should just forget about them. They can literaly be anything. After years if ghost hunting I've only seen one orb photo that impressed me. We had three different cameras once catch a giant solid pinkish orb next to one of our members head and it was about the size of her head to. Other then spmething like that I'm not impressed

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Hello Chrizs.

The camera was mine, the video is mine, but there's a person on the video who doesn't want it put online, and I'm happy to respect their wish.

I am not an expert in photography, but I suspect the camera's focus was at infinity. Either way, the camera was shooting at the far wall in the church, and the focus didn't alter throughout.

Thinking about it.... I'm not sure if there is a Focus Assist on the Ixus 75. I don't have the camera anymore, and I can't find a mention of it in the user manual. You must know a lot more about this than me!

The Ixus 75 is quite old (7.1MP and VGA movies); from Canon's specs I cannot determine if it used the much maligned AiAF focusing in stills mode only or also in video. Given the age of the camera instinct rather suggests it probably used single point center AF in video mode, and focus would be fixed at the start of any clip. It did have a focus assist beam.

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