Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
al-amiyr

The Qur'aan Lexicographical Model:

33 posts in this topic

am wondering if it's possible what you trying to do omiyer

to generate arabic verbs by english based letters ?

100% possible. It is called transliteration. There must just be an exact one-to-one correspondence between Arabic letters and English letters then one could perfectly jump from one to the other.

If you are speaking about sounds then there are sounds in Arabic not possessed by English and there are sounds in English not possessed by Arabic. It is also obvious that if I should write all of this in Arabic letters then very few would know what is going on.

Good Question. Seeking more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far so good. I had some confusion reading the chart at the beginning.

Your explanation helps.

I don't speak Arabic, but I know how to read it and some basics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

100% possible. It is called transliteration. There must just be an exact one-to-one correspondence between Arabic letters and English letters then one could perfectly jump from one to the other.

If you are speaking about sounds then there are sounds in Arabic not possessed by English and there are sounds in English not possessed by Arabic. It is also obvious that if I should write all of this in Arabic letters then very few would know what is going on.

Good Question. Seeking more.

humor me for a while and let's do the arabic alpha and english alpha

and tell me .. or us which each letter stand for in the other language

for example : A = أ , B = ب etc etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

humor me for a while and let's do the arabic alpha and english alpha

and tell me .. or us which each letter stand for in the other language

for example : A = أ , B = ب etc etc

Great! I will start working on it and post it later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far so good. I had some confusion reading the chart at the beginning.

Your explanation helps.

I don't speak Arabic, but I know how to read it and some basics.

Great!

The initial presentation was not meant to be fully understood but only to give a basic idea and graphical display of the verbal root word structure of the Qur'aanic Arabic language. In more posts to follow it will be seen how easy and orderly and amazing the Qur'aanic Arabic language is. Nothing compares to it. English in comparison appears like an untidy teacher next to a smart professor. I will soon show the comparisons.

Good! It will help a lot when I am going to unveil the greatest mystery of all time.

Ask more! Questions and ideas are all helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great! I will start working on it and post it later.

could you include what stands for " tashkeel " too in all it's forms to get it done without anything left out

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

could you include what stands for " tashkeel " too in all it's forms to get it done without anything left out

Yes it will be done and easily understood by all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

am wondering if it's possible what you trying to do omiyer

to generate arabic verbs by english based letters ?

- - - - - - - - - -

100% possible. It is called transliteration. There must just be an exact one-to-one correspondence between Arabic letters and English letters then one could perfectly jump from one to the other.

If you are speaking about sounds then there are sounds in Arabic not possessed by English and there are sounds in English not possessed by Arabic. It is also obvious that if I should write all of this in Arabic letters then very few would know what is going on.

Good Question. Seeking more.

- - - - - - - - - -

humor me for a while and let's do the arabic alpha and english alpha

and tell me .. or us which each letter stand for in the other language

for example : A = أ , B = ب etc etc

- - - - - - - - - -

Great! I will start working on it and post it later.

- - - - - - - - - -

could you include what stands for " tashkeel " too in all it's forms to get it done without anything left out

- - - - - - - - - -

Yes it will be done and easily understood by all.

- - - - - - - - - -

could you include what stands for " tashkeel " too in all it's forms to get it done without anything left out

- - - - - - - - - -

Yes it will be done and easily understood by all.

Sorry for the late reply but because of some matters that I had to re-consider, I do not think that it is a good idea to upload all the intended material here. It might be considered going off-topic and I would not like the thread to be closed because the understanding of the first post of The Qur'aan Lexicographical model is important for The Qur'aan Cosmological Model.

The overall statement:

The Arabic language of the Qur'aan which is a detailed explanation of the Book (al-kitaab) consists of an alphabet of 28 letters (consonants) plus one special letter called alif; 3 short vowels written above or below the consonantal letters, which can be extended into 3 long vowels using the 3 universal letters alif (a), waaw (W), and yaa’ (Y); and two important diphthongs ay and aw. From here the entire structure of the language is build upon a well designed arrangement.

Here is the whole Arabic Alphabet (consonants). Just have a look at it.

Remember to read from right to left.

Arabic%20Alphabet1.png

Here is a selection of thirteen Arabic letters with their English equivalents presented as an example.

Arabic%20Alphabet2.png

In the next post I shall give examples of vowel usage inshaa allaah (if God had willed).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.