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Still Waters

The Bayeux tapestry: New findings revealed

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The widely accepted theory that nuns made the Bayeux tapestry has been disputed by experts who say that it was made by a group of professionals.

The tapestry is also revealed to be an embroidery, with the two require differing techniques.

A tapestry is woven on a loom whereas an embroidery has what is known as a "ground fabric" on which threads are sewn or embroidered to form a picture.

The idea that nuns across England made the Bayeux tapestry in nine sections which were then stitched together has been thrown into doubt by the new research.

http://www.telegraph...en-by-nuns.html

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This woman does not know what she is talking about! Tapestry is indeed woven on a loom, however, the word 'tapestry' is also used for(quoting my dictionary here): 'embroidery imitating this(loom tapestry), usually in wools on canvas'. This is what I have always understood tapestry to be and I would imagine it's the original description.

As for the Bayeux Tapestry being constructed on linen, well linen can be a very loose weave(hopsack?), and therefore almost the same as canvas.

'Professionals, not nuns'? I think the nuns would have been considered professionals because the ones doing it would do nothing else outside of their religious duties. They would probably make all sorts of ceremonial dress for the clergy, altar cloths, huge embroidered curtains, religious tapestries etc etc and work to a very high standard.

So, as you were ..... nothing has changed!

Edited by ouija ouija

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If someone is good at something they have been doing for a long time I would consider them a professional at that.

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@ Ouija Ouija:

...And you would know?... Precisely how is that??

Tapestry and Embroidery were far from an Ecclesiastically limited endeavour. There was a huge embroidery industry in England, by no means restricted to Clerical requirements. The Romans and Ancient Greeks also used this artistic representation almost ubiquitously.Considerating that the Bayeaux is not a glorification of their God then it suggests that Professional Embroiderers were used (i.e. paid by the inch).

Edited by keithisco

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Considerating that the Bayeaux is not a glorification of their God then it suggests that Professional Embroiderers were used (i.e. paid by the inch).

The tapestry was most likely commissioned by Bishop Odo, William the Conquerer's half-brother. The Bishop would presumably have influence enough to ensure the nuns took on the task ........ and would not require to be paid 'by the inch'!

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