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Alphamale06

The Ancient Alien Theory Is True

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You bet.

Take a look at the cut out in this mountainside and try and explain it with 'feathers' and 'wedges'

So please let's cut the nonsense.

I trust the pun was intentional :w00t:

interesting cut out though, I agree.

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I trust the pun was intentional :w00t:

interesting cut out though, I agree.

Just a bit. Then maybe our experts can explain why they went to the trouble of treating the surfaces alkali brew and smoothing them off? It just gets worse.

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Just a bit. Then maybe our experts can explain why they went to the trouble of treating the surfaces alkali brew and smoothing them off? It just gets worse.

dont think you will have to wait too long :alien::gun:

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Very nice. Now ask him how it is going to revolutionise the construction industry and put thousands of power tool companies out of business.

Maybe the guy in the above clip could have used some eh?

You know how it works: there's this flower shop nearby,. and you have never visited it during the tme you live there because the shop is fkg expensive.

Ok, in all my enthusiasm I set out to ask this guy about this plant, and of course, you guessed it: he is on holiday until Thursday this week.

Maybe it's better this way... I wonder how I should have asked him about the plant and especially, why I wanted to know, lol.

But all is not lost: I did have a plant in my mind, only it has nothing to do with manipulating stone, but the word 'stone' shows up in its effect on your psyche...

Coleus (Lamiaceae) plant aka Painted Nettle or Flame Nettle

14254055-painted-nettle.jpg

5183567-coleus-lamiaceae-plant-aka-painted-nettle-or-flame-nettle.jpg

15690280-red-coleus-close-up-for-background.jpg

It's common, the leaves of some varieties feel kind of spongy, it's from South America, and you can see it in every florist's shop.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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You know how it works: there's this flower shop nearby,. and you have never visited it during the tme you live there because the shop is fkg expensive.

Ok, in all my enthusiasm I set out to ask this guy about this plant, and of course, you guessed it: he is on holiday until Thursday this week.

Maybe it's better this way... I wonder how I should have asked him about the plant and especially, why I wanted to know, lol.

But all is not lost: I did have a plant in my mind, only it has nothing to do with manipulating stone, but the word 'stone' shows up in its effect on your psyche...

Coleus (Lamiaceae) plant aka Painted Nettle or Flame Nettle

15690280-red-coleus-close-up-for-background.jpg[/img]

It's common, the leaves of some varieties feel kind of spongy, it's from South America, and you can see it in every florist's shop.

.

Ah that's it then. Problem solved.

The AA hypothesis is no more.

:blush:

Edited by zoser

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Meanwhile back to reality.

More tell tale signs on the stonework.

What do these flattish surfaces suggest?

zoser21_zpsd29f522f.jpg

That the stone was moulded back into position using some implement perhaps? Maybe these got a little too hot?

Also here is another non-natural handling mark:

zoser22_zpsf35be290.jpg

Difficult to explain any other way than a handling mark when the block was clay like.

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Ah that's it then. Problem solved.

The AA hypothesis is no more.

:blush:

Heh. But I think you can guess what I am going to do...

I have searched through these herbal medicine books of mine, and the Coleus is the only one (up to now} that comes closest to the description.

Those who 'used' it said it tasted horrible, and I have survived some of similar experiences in the Peruvian jungle.

But I will have to find me a piece of granite, a Coleus potplant, and a bit of heavy-duty glaswork (lab; but that I still have, somewhere).

If you people don't hear from me soon, you'll know something went wrong.

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Meanwhile back to reality.

More tell tale signs on the stonework.

What do these flattish surfaces suggest?

zoser21_zpsd29f522f.jpg

That the stone was moulded back into position using some implement perhaps? Maybe these got a little too hot?

Also here is another non-natural handling mark:

zoser22_zpsf35be290.jpg

Difficult to explain any other way than a handling mark when the block was clay like.

Back to reality, and then you say the block was clay like.

I think the only difference between your view and mine is the way they could have been able to make these rocks clay like, not that they did.

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Heh. But I think you can guess what I am going to do...

I have searched through these herbal medicine books of mine, and the Coleus is the only one (up to now} that comes closest to the description.

Those who 'used' it said it tasted horrible, and I have survived some of similar experiences in the Peruvian jungle.

But I will have to find me a piece of granite, a Coleus potplant, and a bit of heavy-duty glaswork (lab; but that I still have, somewhere).

If you people don't hear from me soon, you'll know something went wrong.

I've got to admire you Abe. I must get over to Holland and have some beers with you I really must.

Go for it.

:tu:

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I've got to admire you Abe. I must get over to Holland and have some beers with you I really must.

Go for it.

:tu:

LOL, you do that, and I will give you beer you have never tasted before: it's strong as wine (11%). Very inspirational brew (in this context, pun intended).

AND..... cold. Continental beer. Not ale.

But I hope you are someone else is willing to do a search, and come up with another common Peruvian/Amazonian plant with spongy red/purple leaves.

Btw, my next trip is to a supermarket nearby. They sell potplants and flowers, and they have not the faintest clue how these plants should be called. Yeah, the tags say "This is a balcony plant, and you should put it in the shade in summer, and water it regularly".

I have seen Coleus hanging out there.

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Back to reality, and then you say the block was clay like.

I think the only difference between your view and mine is the way they could have been able to make these rocks clay like, not that they did.

I understand the argument of where is the heat source etc. I have a dozen questions about it myself. The difference in the two approaches is that you are looking for how stone age folk could have done it with their means and resources. The only problem with that approach is that it becomes ever more creative and inventive. (Inventive to imply made up or fantastic).

My approach is to look at what the stones are telling us and that's not really open to interpretation if all the artefacts are considered.

Take the precision work in post 3899 as an example.

By conventional means the border would need to be stitch drilled along the heights and that long width. It looks in the order of 3m long. Could be even longer.

How many holes? 30, 40 or 50? Not easy with a bow and copper tubes. Already we are into the copper usage argument again.

Then feathers and wedges from underneath. Not easy to obtain the force when hitting upwards with little clearance.

Then supposing it splits cleanly which I doubt given the large length.

Then they finish the wall with alkali brew.

Why for God's sake go to that trouble to obtain a complete block (and level the stone left behind!).

So one asks did they want an intact block or just nice clean cut out? Did they rough hack the stone out having stitch drilled it first to get some sort of border?

That is far more likely from the workload point of view but still ridiculous. It looks more like they wanted an intact block to me rather than a perfect cut out in a rock to no purpose. A sacred temple perhaps? Well not so sacred when there are scores of these lying around the place.

The reasoning just gets dafter.

Edited by zoser

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AND..... cold. Continental beer. Not ale.

A lot of British Ale is foul I agree. There are some incredible citrus flavour beers now being made that are just awesome. This is what the Brits call 'real ale' and is not pasteurised or filtered like the European or American 'lagers'.

I have heard good things about Belgium and Dutch beers.

Here is the stuff that I really like:

3987442844_22b3f94d8c.jpg

Real Ale not bottled. Unfiltered and unpasteurised.

Very hoppy and 'citrus' flavour. Served about 10 deg. Not too chilled.

http://www.thornbridgebrewery.co.uk/thornbridge-cask-beer.php

I visited the brewery last August in Bakewell Derbyshire.

Do the Dutch make unpasteurised beer?

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Jaipur, I have never even heard of it, but what you posted about it sounds quite tasty.

Do we make unpasteurised beer here? Man, I haven't the faintest clue. I buy the bottles or the cans, and that's about it.

When I was 16 or something, my highschool classmates and I visited a brewery in Amsterdam ("Amstel"), and we all expected free drinks getting drunk and so on (those were the 60's and 70's ok?). But after we walked past those huge 'bath tubs' with ripening beer (think 'horrible smell') not one of us was eager to even have a beer, lol.

But I think we are getting somewhat off-topic.

Well, unless it's beer the Incas used to carve out their building blocks, lol.

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Just a bit. Then maybe our experts can explain why they went to the trouble of treating the surfaces alkali brew and smoothing them off? It just gets worse.

The question is why did they do that.

Not how.

Harte

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Nice guess work though eh? When you find the exact evidence?

On the first picture the bottom arrow shows the bulging out effect again. The top arrow more handling marks.

zoser17_zps69695709.jpg

Could this next picture indicate evidence of final finishing? The overhang looks as if it has been trimmed off. Again this would not be such a gargantuan task if the stone was semi-soft:

zoser18-1_zps8b57dcb1.jpg

I can't for the life of me put in words what a staggering accomplishment this is.

Even putting aside the "how's" of the this feat, I can't help but wonder why?

It would be so much easier to accept and understand if they had used the logic we apply today...use bricks all of the same size and shape and small enough to move efficiently. Why did they chose a method that would be incredibly difficult even with today's modern machinery and techniques?

If we could travel back in time to actually see their culture and live with them to learn how they think and lived would be the only way to understand.

Cleary their way of thinking, their priorities, and their logic were so radically different from ours, or even the primitive tribes living today, thet we would find ourselves living in an "alien" world.

Perhaps the "technology" they used was completely different from what we think of. They must have been off in a completely different direction. We think of technology as modern machinery, architecture, engineering, electronics etc as modern technology.

Cleary there methods, means and motivation were so different that our way of thinking can't comprehend it.

In that way, I have to agree that the ancients technology was "alien" to us, but terrestrial for them.

Seems that without some major archeological discovery, it's going to remain a mystery.

I am frustrated that their doesn't seem to be much financial or academic input going in to getting some major research done on this.

Although lots of information has been posted here, I still am having trouble accepting it.

Edited by synchronomy
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The question is why did they do that.

Not how.

Harte

They wanted it to look nice.

Like we do.

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Jaipur, I have never even heard of it, but what you posted about it sounds quite tasty.

Do we make unpasteurised beer here? Man, I haven't the faintest clue. I buy the bottles or the cans, and that's about it.

When I was 16 or something, my highschool classmates and I visited a brewery in Amsterdam ("Amstel"), and we all expected free drinks getting drunk and so on (those were the 60's and 70's ok?). But after we walked past those huge 'bath tubs' with ripening beer (think 'horrible smell') not one of us was eager to even have a beer, lol.

But I think we are getting somewhat off-topic.

Well, unless it's beer the Incas used to carve out their building blocks, lol.

Off topic? I think we deserve it after a hard days posting. Just to say I'm not keen on that roasted taste with bottled beers and lagers. That's a sign of pasteurisation.

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The question is why did they do that.

Not how.

Harte

And if we are to believe it was done by sweat and toil, then was it worth it?

The deductive reasoning looking at the artefacts says to me that it wasn't that difficult for them.

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I can't for the life of me put in words what a staggering accomplishment this is.

Even putting aside the "how's" of the this feat, I can't help but wonder why?

It would be so much easier to accept and understand if they had used the logic we apply today...use bricks all of the same size and shape and small enough to move efficiently. Why did they chose a method that would be incredibly difficult even with today's modern machinery and techniques?

If we could travel back in time to actually see their culture and live with them to learn how they think and lived would be the only way to understand.

Cleary their way of thinking, their priorities, and their logic were so radically different from ours, or even the primitive tribes living today, thet we would find ourselves living in an "alien" world.

Perhaps the "technology" they used was completely different from what we think of. They must have been off in a completely different direction. We think of technology as modern machinery, architecture, engineering, electronics etc as modern technology.

Cleary there methods, means and motivation were so different that our way of thinking can't comprehend it.

In that way, I have to agree that the ancients technology was "alien" to us, but terrestrial for them.

Seems that without some major archeological discovery, it's going to remain a mystery.

I am frustrated that their doesn't seem to be much financial or academic input going in to getting some major research done on this.

Although lots of information has been posted here, I still am having trouble accepting it.

Totally agree. It's only when you look deeply at the precision and scale that such perceptions dawn.

Edited by zoser

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There is NOTHING in any of those pictures, zoser, that cannot be accomplished with a large enough workforce, tools that we know the Inca had, and enough time.

Besides, I think the you're the only one who see such "precision". If they could melt blocks or use sound and lasers, why the hell are all the blocks you're posting pictures of so non-uniform in shape, size, etc?

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There is NOTHING in any of those pictures, zoser, that cannot be accomplished with a large enough workforce, tools that we know the Inca had, and enough time.

Besides, I think the you're the only one who see such "precision". If they could melt blocks or use sound and lasers, why the hell are all the blocks you're posting pictures of so non-uniform in shape, size, etc?

Not true. Do a search on the web and see what others think. That's clearly why you think it could have been done by stone age folk. I disagree.

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Does any of you geniuses know about a Peruvian herb/plant/shrub that is common and has red/purple, spongy leaves?

Think about that one for a change.

This is not a contest about who is able to p*** off the other one, or who is able to win the 'debate', but it is about what we can learn from eachother.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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Not true. Do a search on the web and see what others think. That's clearly why you think it could have been done by stone age folk. I disagree.

You realize that this is the 4th time that you've had to be told that neither the Tiwanaku nor the Inca were stone age peoples?

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But I think it is very unlikely that an extreme heat source was used to melt the rocks.

And I have to agree Abe.

Sadly it seems I know now for sure some of my factual posts are ignored, maybe because they involve a bit of reading.... now when I was looking into the Arthur C Clarke story of when he and his team set about 'recreating' possible ancient methods that may have led to this 'vitrification'... one of the ways that they found just doesnt work, was heating...as, most rocks will split at high temps, not get soft and pliable!.

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Many of those incredibly accurate Puma Punku stones were made of red sand stone.

And red sand stone is quite easy to carve.

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