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Alphamale06

The Ancient Alien Theory Is True

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There's loads of ancient mysteries. We can't all explain them. I don't fully accept it was impossible to build the giant structures although plenty of mysteries cause the mind to boggle.

I don't want to spend too long explaining this. This ancient alien theory doesn't help explain how these megaliths, landmark images, pyramids, ect were built. They only show physical proof that they were made.

What's the matter with the idea that ancient humans did all of this anyway?

1) Modern humans have tried - and failed.

2) The tools available were not capable.

3) A closer look at the stones reveals high technology. Vitrification, machining cuts, softening technology, and moulding.

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They wanted to establish a higher civilisation here. Kind of assisted evolution. At times this was a success, other times a disaster and involved mixing genetics etc.

The pyramids were energy producing machines. Precision construction is always done for energy output (radiation) in one form or another.

The precision walls in Peru were all done in granite (Andesite) which is rich in quartz. Quartz is an energy producing crystal when excited by resonance or vibration.

So thery were harnessing natural earth energies to make these walls produce energy.

They would not have gone to that trouble for any other reason.

Defence, fortification, art, etc are nothing more than talking points for fools.

Andesite is not granite. That's why they call it andesite. It's the volcanic form of Diorite. Quartz content varies by type but in general it contains very little if any. Check you facts before you shoot your mouth off.

Form follows function. The Inca constructs don't even have any of the features allegedly so integral to making the GP work, not that it could have since this whole piezoelectric granite business is nothing more than the product of a warped imagination . They're just walls, not even isolated walls.

But you knew all this already or you wouldn't be trying to flamebait this late in the game.

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Andesite is not granite. That's why they call it andesite. It's the volcanic form of Diorite. Quartz content varies by type but in general it contains very little if any. Check you facts before you shoot your mouth off.

Form follows function. The Inca constructs don't even have any of the features allegedly so integral to making the GP work, not that it could have since this whole piezoelectric granite business is nothing more than the product of a warped imagination . They're just walls, not even isolated walls.

But you knew all this already or you wouldn't be trying to flamebait this late in the game.

You amaze me Mr O:

Andesite is the most common volcanic rock after basalt. It is porphyritic, that is, consists of coarsecrystals (phenocrysts) embedded in a granular or glassy matrix (groundmass). Having a silica content of 57%, it is in the intermediate category (526% silica) of the silicicafic scale.

http://www.enotes.com/andesite-reference/andesite

This is why even though I have respect for you I don't really believe what you say without checking up.

Want to retract your statement?

Edited by zoser

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Andesite is not granite. That's why they call it andesite. It's the volcanic form of Diorite. Quartz content varies by type but in general it contains very little if any. Check you facts before you shoot your mouth off.

Form follows function. The Inca constructs don't even have any of the features allegedly so integral to making the GP work, not that it could have since this whole piezoelectric granite business is nothing more than the product of a warped imagination . They're just walls, not even isolated walls.

But you knew all this already or you wouldn't be trying to flamebait this late in the game.

The precision work in quartz bearing stone is the biggest single enigmatic feature of ancient cultures in Peru, Egypt and Bolivia. It can be seen on a smaller scale in Turkey as well.

This fact is highly significant, and modern archaeology simply fails to explain it, preferring instead to brush it under the carpet.

They could have used softer stone and made their lives considerably easier. Quartz bearing rock was obviously highly significant to them.

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Another image of 'The Wall of Living Rock' in Peru.

Where the stone has been extracted is totally smooth and displays the same vitrification effect seen on the walls, caves and rock outcrops:

Sacsayhuaman13_zps424e0740.jpg

Edited by zoser

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You amaze me Mr O:

Andesite is the most common volcanic rock after basalt. It is porphyritic, that is, consists of coarsecrystals (phenocrysts) embedded in a granular or glassy matrix (groundmass). Having a silica content of 57%, it is in the intermediate category (526% silica) of the silicicafic scale.

http://www.enotes.co...erence/andesite

This is why even though I have respect for you I don't really believe what you say without checking up.

Want to retract your statement?

All quartz is silica but all silica is not quartz. Silicates include a wide variety of minerals besides quartz. From wiki: The mineral assemblage is typically dominated by plagioclase plus pyroxene and/or hornblende. Magnetite, zircon, apatite, ilmenite, biotite, and garnet are common accessory minerals.[1] Alkali feldspar may be present in minor amounts. The quartz-feldspar abundances in andesite and other volcanic rocks are illustrated in QAPF diagrams.

Not even enough quartz to rate mentioning. But let's check that QAPF diagram: http://en.wikipedia....canic_field.gif

Note where andesite sits on the Q scale.

But wait, what's this? "embedded in a granular or glassy matrix." What's that bolded word there?

Edited by Oniomancer
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The precision work in quartz bearing stone is the biggest single enigmatic feature of ancient cultures in Peru, Egypt and Bolivia. It can be seen on a smaller scale in Turkey as well.

This fact is highly significant, and modern archaeology simply fails to explain it, preferring instead to brush it under the carpet.

They could have used softer stone and made their lives considerably easier. Quartz bearing rock was obviously highly significant to them.

Again, quartz content in some of these rocks is highly questionable. I'll wager these rocks have quite a few characteristics in common. You're picking one out of a hat that isn't even significant in the way you claim.

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All quartz is silica but all silica is not quartz. Silicates include a wide variety of minerals besides quartz. From wiki: The mineral assemblage is typically dominated by plagioclase plus pyroxene and/or hornblende. Magnetite, zircon, apatite, ilmenite, biotite, and garnet are common accessory minerals.[1] Alkali feldspar may be present in minor amounts. The quartz-feldspar abundances in andesite and other volcanic rocks are illustrated in QAPF diagrams.

Not even enough quartz to rate mentioning. But let's check that QAPF diagram: http://en.wikipedia....canic_field.gif

Note where andesite sits on the Q scale.

But wait, what's this? "embedded in a granular or glassy matrix." What's that bolded word there?

I think you are trying too hard Mr O. This is simply not going to work.

All sources point to the same conclusion:

intermediate igneous rocks containing between 52 - 63% SiO2 (example andesite and dacite)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igneous_rock

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An intriguing photograph showing evidence of stone moulding. These anomalies can be found all over the rock outcrops in Peru. The walls at Cuzco and Sacsayhuaman also bear unexplainable moulding marks.

Sacsayhuaman10_zps68328c0e.jpg

Edited by zoser
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Here is an excellent video containing scores of images of precision stonework, moulding and vitrification.

The only problem is that the stills tend to come and go a little quickly.

Get ready on the pause button!

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Again, quartz content in some of these rocks is highly questionable. I'll wager these rocks have quite a few characteristics in common. You're picking one out of a hat that isn't even significant in the way you claim.

The significant feature is that they are both highly rich in crystals. Exactly what purpose those crystals played in the function of the walls has still to be discovered.

That remains the key to the mystery.

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Moulding not chiselling or pounding:

Moulding5_zps72277332.jpg

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Maybe the answer lies here:

This needs looking into but Hutchinson demonstrates:

1) Anti-gravity technology.

2) Electrical energy from stone (shades of the Great Pyramid?)

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An iron bar is softened and distorted:

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Hutchinson discusses the effects of the technology.

If this energy were directed it could explain the stone anomalies; precision and moulding.

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I think you are trying too hard Mr O. This is simply not going to work.

All sources point to the same conclusion:

intermediate igneous rocks containing between 52 - 63% SiO2 (example andesite and dacite)

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Igneous_rock

No, you're not trying hard enough.:

"The lack of quartz, and so no mineral which has a hardness of over 5.5, makes it possible to distinguish andesite..."

- Field Book of Common Rocks and Minerals, Frederic B. Loomis

" Contains little quartz but is rich in ferromagnesian minerals..."

- Rocks and Minerals, Joel Abram

SiO2 is just plain silicon dioxide. Plain old silica. All but 3 of the component minerals listed by wiki are silicates, meaning they contain silica. None are peizoelectric. All rocks contain crystals, except obsidian.

Since when did Protzen start referring to himself in the third person like Scruffy from Futurama?

The so-called hutchinson effect isn't anywhere near as impressive as the Copperfield Effect:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wChk5nY3Kzg

So, to recap, No significant quartz, so no peizoelectricity, which doesn't work that way in the first place, so no power plant, so no advanced machinery.

Plus all that other AA stuff which is nonexistent or wrong, so no theory and no argument.

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The so-called hutchinson effect isn't anywhere near as impressive as the Copperfield Effect:

David Copperfield? See some REAL MAGIC and levitation... with no strings

.

Edited by seeder
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we're watching a doco on Britain, and they're talking about "beerstone" (spelling??) and how if worked in the underground qusrry it's realtively soft and great for fine detail work, but exposed to the air it hardens to something so hsrd it's used for cathedeals andvthe Rimans loved it forvit's durability.

is it possible the "softened" rock is similar, and what we're seeing is the now hardened and exposed rock from old mines (ie once they were underground, but are now exposed and have hardened) there's some evidence to support this with the tunnels Zoser's enamoured with showing signs of being excavated

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Ah, that'll be stone from here. --> http://en.wikipedia....er_Quarry_Caves

But there's no incredible Precision I'm afraid. :(

Edited by Lord Vetinari

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less the precision and more the "soft stone turns hard".

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1) Modern humans have tried - and failed.

2) The tools available were not capable.

3) A closer look at the stones reveals high technology. Vitrification, machining cuts, softening technology, and moulding.

Yes this is quite true but modern humans lack so much skill.

I agree it was high technology with awesome precision.

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Moulding not chiselling or pounding:

Moulding5_zps72277332.jpg

Chiseling, pounding and scraping, not moulding. I've done lots of chiseling and pounding of rocks.

Have you done any moulding of rocks? You haven't? Then you might want to listen to someone who knows something about masonry for a change instead of making unfounded claims based on ignorance.

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Maybe the answer lies here:

This needs looking into but Hutchinson demonstrates:

1) Anti-gravity technology.

2) Electrical energy from stone (shades of the Great Pyramid?)

[media=]

[/media]

I watched the video and saw a few problems with it.

The first part with the objects on the metal plate on the floor:

There are two shots from a distance and one close up. The distance shots have all the things spread out and the close up shot have them all together. The close shot was placed in-between the distance shots and the only reason I can think it would have been done like that was to give the illusion that they all moved together and then back apart. Also the troll doll in the silver suit changes position from one shot to another, but it never moves on it's own.

The Meter Reading:

He is using a volt/ohm meter. The details of the meter are too fuzzy to see what the meter is set at so it may be reading the resistance (ohms) instead of the supposed voltage.

The Levitating Items:

As the cup with the liquid rises, the liquid does not react as normal liquid would do when you move a cup. The liquid never moves at all. I'm pretty sure it's a solid object to make it look like the cup has water

The cup with what appears to be honey (or something similar) sits there while the honey rises when the entire cup should have risen before the honey would have moved.

The green plate, saw and especially the wrench ( the first one at about 6:55) do not act as if it was anti gravity. With a lack of gravity, they would have just risen as they were, but in each case an edge/end rises first and then the object rises in the air. This is especially noticeable with the wrench. It is obvious that some very small line was used to hoist the objects up and possibly edited out later.

Something else that bothers me is he discovers the effect, it takes him 10 years to be able to reproduce it, he fine tunes it so he can supposedly do it any time he wants and then what does he do? Does he offer it to the government or make deals with companies to market devices based on his work? No he doesn't. After all that time and work, he sells it on E-Bay, supposedly to two German firms for $50,000 . He tells them that because of the amount of stuff he has sold on Craig's List and E-Bay he can't guarantee he can get the lab to work but they supposedly still buy it. He comments that he is going to leave Canad for good and pursue other interests but I see he is still in Canada and for a living buys and sells used military equipment.

The obvious fake video and his actions are to me clear indicators he is a fraud.

You may want to look for other evidence to support your theory Zoser.

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Yes this is quite true but modern humans lack so much skill.

I agree it was high technology with awesome precision.

Yes but the problem is our modern historical and evolutionary theory completely precludes ancient high technology. It had to come from somewhere and here's the important part; it disappeared without a trace.

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