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granpa

Nephilim = Sons of Nephele (Cent-χείρ-s)

16 posts in this topic

Comparative_mythology_chart

X0Ept.png

Nephele - Religion-wiki

In
,
Nephele
(
: Νεφέλη, from νέφος
nephos
"cloud";
to
Nubes
) was a cloud
who figured prominently in the story of
and Helle.

Greek myth also has it that Nephele is the cloud whom
created in the image of
to trick
to test his integrity after displaying his lust for Hera during a feast as a guest of Zeus. Ixion failed in restraining his lust for Hera, thus fathering the
.

Cent-χείρ (100-handers):

In
, a
centaur
(from Ancient
Κένταυροι
– Kéntauroi) or
hippocentaur
is a member of a composite race of creatures, part human and part horse. In early Attic and Boeotian vase-paintings, as on the
kantharos
, they are depicted with the hindquarters of a horse attached to them; in later renderings centaurs are given the torso of a human joined at the waist to the horse's withers, where the horse's neck would be.

This half-human and half-animal composition has led many writers to treat them as liminal beings, caught between the two natures, embodied in contrasted myths, both as the embodiment of untamed nature, as in their battle with the
, or conversely as teachers, like
.

Hekatonkheires - Religion-wiki

The
Hekatonkheires
, or
Hecatonchires
(pronounced:ˌhɛkətəŋˈkaɪriːz;
: Ἑκατόγχειρες "Hundred-Handed Ones,"
Centimani
), were figures in an archaic stage of
, three giants of incredible strength and ferocity, that surpasses that of all of
whom they helped overthrow. Their name derives from the Ancient Greek ἑκατόν (
hekaton
; "hundred") and χείρ (
kheir
; "hand"), "each of them having a hundred hands and fifty heads"

Niflheim - Religion-wiki

Niflheim
(or
Niflheimr
) ("Mist Home", the "Abode of Mist" or "Mist World") is one of the
and is a location in
which overlaps with the notions of
and
. The name
Niflheimr
only appears in two extant sources,
Gylfaginning
and the much debated
Hrafnagaldr Óðins
.

According to
Gylfaginning
, it was one of the two primordial realms, the other one being Muspelheim, the realm of fire. Between these two realms of cold and heat, creation began. Later, it became the location of Hel, the abode of those who did not die a heroic death.
Edited by granpa
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Aside from sharing a bunch of definitions, I'm not sure what you are trying to discuss. Perhaps someone else knows more and can enlighten me.

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"Sons of" would be "Benei" in Hebrew

“Sons of God” is “Benei ha-Elohim”

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Not sure on this one granpa but thought this was an interesting connection to Orion, whose followers/sons are called possibly Nephilim in Aramaic, and him being a cloud, like Nephele.:

The 16th-century Italian mythographer Natalis Comes interpreted the whole story of Orion as an allegory of the evolution of a storm cloud: Begotten by air (Zeus), water (Poseidon), and the sun (Apollo), a storm cloud is diffused (Chios, which Comes derives from χέω, "pour out"), rises though the upper air (Aërope, as Comes spells Merope), chills (is blinded), and is turned into rain by the moon (Artemis). He also explains how Orion walked on the sea: "Since the subtler part of the water which is rarefied rests on the surface, it is said that Orion learned from his father how to walk on water."[67] Similarly, Orion's conception made him a symbol of the philosophical child, an allegory of philosophy springing from multiple sources, in the Renaissance as in alchemical works, with some variations. The 16th-century German alchemist Michael Maier lists the fathers as Apollo, Vulcan and Mercury,[68] and the 18th-century French alchemist Antoine-Joseph Pernety gave them as Jupiter, Neptune and Mercury

http://en.wikipedia....rion_(mythology)

In Aramaic culture, the term niyphelah refers to the Constellation of Orion, and nephilim to the offspring of Orion in mythology. (A bit dubious though)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephilim

I think also that Orion can be equated with Osiris.

Edited by The Puzzler

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I think also that Orion can be equated with Osiris.

According to my chart, that is reasonable

ouranos = Ir-on-os = eye-great-many = many great eyes

centaur = 100 hand

cronus = chiron-os =chir-on-os = hand great many

Edited by granpa

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BTW, that chart loads very slowly (I dont know why)

so if you just want the greek mythology you can use this:

http://religion.wiki...ogy_chart/Greek

you can also download the charts webpage to your hardrive and it will load much faster from there

Edited by granpa

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Sitchin assumes "nephilim" comes from the Hebrew word "naphal" which usually means "to fall." He then forces the meaning "to come down" onto the word, creating his "to come down from above" translation. In the form we find it in the Hebrew Bible, if the word nephilim came from Hebrew naphal, it would not be spelled as we find it. The form nephilim cannot mean "fallen ones" (the spelling would then be nephulim). Likewise nephilim does not mean "those who fall" or "those who fall away" (that would be nophelim). The only way in Hebrew to get nephilim from naphal by the rules of Hebrew morphology (word formation) would be to presume a noun spelled naphil and then pluralize it. I say "presume" since this noun does not exist in biblical Hebrew -- unless one counts Genesis 6:4 and Numbers 13:33, the two occurrences of nephilim -- but that would then be assuming what one is trying to prove! However, in Aramaic the noun naphil(a) does exist. It means "giant," making it easy to see why the Septuagint (the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible) translated nephilim as gigantes ("giant").

Source: Michael Heiser

Harte

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Not wanting to come off as dim, I did look at the chart for a few minutes. Granpa, Biblical teachings seem to diverge quite a bit from the mythological references you have there. At least, the apocryphal texts do...with the "watchers" and what not mating with human women leading to the nephilim. Whereas Nephele appears in mythology to be one being spawning many? Interesting theories. :tu:

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Ne-phil-im = Un-fall-en ones?

νεφελη

nephele

a cloud

used of the cloud which led the Israelites in the wilderness

clouds don't fall

Edited by granpa
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Typical of a Grandpa. Starts a conversation, wanders off, then reappears 15 months later to continue the conversation.

(only joking, granpa)

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Typical of a Grandpa. Starts a conversation, wanders off, then reappears 15 months later to continue the conversation.

(only joking, granpa)

And without reading any ensuing posts.

Like mine, where I show him that Nephilim does not mean "fallen ones."

Harte

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And without reading any ensuing posts.

Like mine, where I show him that Nephilim does not mean "fallen ones."

Harte

Well, you're attempting to introduce reasonable lingusitic information into this situation, rather than lego linguistics. You can see why that'd be ignored.

--Jaylemurph

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Some connections ...

Nevel (Ne-Val) is the mist we know (when warm moist air falls down on the cold ground and forms a cloud).

I think Sitchin didn't really invent the meaning of the falling down of the Nephilim from the total void (see below extract from 17th ce), he maybe did it only in a more spectacular way as extraterrestrials it seems. The 'down fall' of the Nephilim can be more realistic interpreted as the attack from above (just from a higher region, mountains).

For attack we still use the word aan-val (fall on).

The Gigantes can evenly be interpreted as the people living in higher regions (Sich-An 'ts -> the ones you look on as they are high above, Sich as in Sight).

Naphalim_zps828eca49.png

Gigantes_zps02de13c4.png

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According to my chart, that is reasonable

ouranos = Ir-on-os = eye-great-many = many great eyes

centaur = 100 hand

cronus = chiron-os =chir-on-os = hand great many

Sounds very Edo Nyland-ish.

For those who don't know who Edo Nyland is, read and suffer...

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~legneref/bronze/nylink2.htm

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Some connections ...

Nevel (Ne-Val) is the mist we know (when warm moist air falls down on the cold ground and forms a cloud).

I think Sitchin didn't really invent the meaning of the falling down of the Nephilim from the total void (see below extract from 17th ce), he maybe did it only in a more spectacular way as extraterrestrials it seems. The 'down fall' of the Nephilim can be more realistic interpreted as the attack from above (just from a higher region, mountains).

For attack we still use the word aan-val (fall on).

The Gigantes can evenly be interpreted as the people living in higher regions (Sich-An 'ts -> the ones you look on as they are high above, Sich as in Sight).

Naphalim_zps828eca49.png

Gigantes_zps02de13c4.png

From a perspective sympathetic to cultural anthropology, a better interpretation of the use of the word 'nephilim' describing 'giant or great beings' in a way synonymous to 'gigantes' can be explained by it's denoting of mythological or legendary figures from antiquity who had a significant influence on the cultural mythos of the people.

This could mean the 'nephilim' were, in fact, ordinary people - real or imagined - from that culture's antiquity (but who may not be of that culture) who are aggrandised (and/or otherwise distorted) in myth or legend because of their impact (in whatever fashion) on that culture's history.

There is absolutely no need to read 'nephilim' literally and deduce there existed some unknown race of giant people/beings in the distant past.

Edited by Leonardo
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There is absolutely no need to read 'nephilim' literally and deduce there existed some unknown race of giant people/beings in the distant past.

...but that wouldn't be nearly as entertaining. And as everyone knows, entertainment is the second purpose of history, after "tool to show how clever I am at manipulating data".

--Jaylemurph

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