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Stonecoldvampzy

Serbians told Vampire is on the loose

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A VAMPIRE on the loose in Serbia, the country’s residents are being warned.

Garlic sales in the region of Bajina Basta are booming after a local council issued the warning of a possible escaped vampire.

http://www.thesun.co...-the-loose.html

Well this is a nice way to boost garlic sales! :w00t:

Edited by Lethanial
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[/left]

http://www.thesun.co...-the-loose.html

Well this is a nice way to boost garlic sales! :w00t:

It’s all very well for people who don’t live in the area to laugh at our fears but nobody in the region is in any doubt that vampires do exist,” said Mr Vujetic.

good, i shall feel free to laugh at your superstitious silliness.

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A vamp is a woman who allures and exploits men, so grab her extract her teeth and call her (G)umpire.

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[/left]

http://www.thesun.co...-the-loose.html

Well this is a nice way to boost garlic sales! :w00t:

Its a long way from Siberia to Serbia. ??

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Its a long way from Siberia to Serbia. ??

You're indeed right, I made a typo there. My Apologies!

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Didn't they just discover bigfoot over there too?

Maybe the vampire will just eat bigfoot.

GASP! what if there's a vampire bigfoot!?!?

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I'm from Croatia, a country next to Serbia. This case is quite interesting because they are not known to be a superstitious people, contradictory to what the article says. And the legend of their vampire i've never heard. In any case, i'll try to keep everyone posted about this unsual Balkans case :)

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Nevermind.. Thread title needs revised!

Edited by Legaia

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Send it to the UK . It`ll be given another house .

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I'm not surprised that they would take things like this seriously, no offense.

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I'm not surprised that they would take things like this seriously, no offense.

Well I've seen Mickey Mouse walking down Broadway,so he must be real to. These people must be seriously uneducated to believe in this rubbish. Sorry no offence meant.

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I'm from Croatia, a country next to Serbia. This case is quite interesting because they are not known to be a superstitious people, contradictory to what the article says. And the legend of their vampire i've never heard. In any case, i'll try to keep everyone posted about this unsual Balkans case :)

Hi, Boris, it's nice to bump into a fellow countryman on the world wide web. If only we were from the same parallel universe too... because superstition is rampant in this neighbourhood.

Especially in Serbia, have you not heard of "Vlaška magija" (the magic of Vlah people, they brought their beliefs from Romania) and how serious a lot of people takes it still?

(Nothing offensive in that fact, it's part of their heritage and found its way into my heritage too. What not to love about good, old-fashioned vampire story? That has roots in true weird events ;) )

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Hi, Boris, it's nice to bump into a fellow countryman on the world wide web. If only we were from the same parallel universe too... because superstition is rampant in this neighbourhood.

Especially in Serbia, have you not heard of "Vla¨ka magija" (the magic of Vlah people, they brought their beliefs from Romania) and how serious a lot of people takes it still?

(Nothing offensive in that fact, it's part of their heritage and found its way into my heritage too. What not to love about good, old-fashioned vampire story? That has roots in true weird events ;) )

What does Lyle think of it all ? Has a vampire ever chomped him ? Imagine a vampire hatopus .

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I'm from Croatia, a country next to Serbia. This case is quite interesting because they are not known to be a superstitious people, contradictory to what the article says. And the legend of their vampire i've never heard. In any case, i'll try to keep everyone posted about this unsual Balkans case :)

Interesting . . . Croatia was the site of one of the first vampire epidemics of the modern age. In 1672 Giure Grando, late of Khring on the Istrian peninsula, Croatia, apparently returned from the grave and caused many deaths.

The Bosnian "Lampir" is the name of the oldest recorded vampire Meho Lampir.

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What does Lyle think of it all ? Has a vampire ever chomped him ? Imagine a vampire hatopus .

I’m the vampire in this symbiosis, leave the hatopus alone :D

There are loads of folk vampire stories... or vampire folk stories... over here, some as “new” as early 20th century.

Today, I can’t say anyone truly believes in vampires, but every village or part of any town has its house with bad history and more-less inexplicable goings-on.

I heard Sava the first Serbian vampire Savanović story, I know he was a real person before he died and got up as a vampire, but I didn’t know the actual house was still there. I’m absolutely certain he was not the first Serbian vampire, since the belief is much older than Sava and his house.

It reminds me, few years ago there was this cute story about possible vampire in Serbia... a young boy has a grandfather who’s sitting all day, stopped communicating, just stares blank in the distance and sometimes goes out to wander around, all pale and expressionless... god help the not superstitious folk that bumps into him in provincial twilight... being not known to be superstitious people, his family came to conclusion he must turned into a vampire. No, not dementia or stroke or whatever, he obviously has become a vampire.

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Interesting . . . Croatia was the site of one of the first vampire epidemics of the modern age. In 1672 Giure Grando, late of Khring on the Istrian peninsula, Croatia, apparently returned from the grave and caused many deaths.

The Bosnian "Lampir" is the name of the oldest recorded vampire Meho Lampir.

:yes: They dug up a “vampire” out of his grave in one of cemeteries of Opatija, Croatia, in 1881, mind you. I often walk there, only it’s now a park.

Similar to Jure Grando, this one, Ivan Varljen, would get up from his grave and walk around at night, scaring women and children, so three men decided to dig up Ivan’s grave, pierce his unruly corpse with a wooden stake, cut his tendons on both legs, tie him up, toss him face down and then, finally, rebury him. A little overdone if you ask me, but on the other hand, if it was me seeing Ivan vampiring around my house, maybe I’d toss an additional stone on top of him too.

I find it interesting that vampire legends are particularly common in Istria, the same Croatian region that had influx of Romanian population. They are called Aromuns or Istro-Romanians and apparently they brought their vampire legends with them.

Or they brought actual vampires with them :D

Edited by Helen of Annoy

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Have we actually reached the 21st Century yet?

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Have we actually reached the 21st Century yet?

I didn’t know it’s obligatory.

Seriously now, looks like the initial source for the article was Russian Pravda, known for its – ahem – loosely based on actual events approach.

The reality probably looks like this: The house in which it is believed Sava Savanović once lived, has collapsed due to no maintenance at all and there was no maintenance due to the local legend of Sava being a vampire. People probably don't really believe in vampires, but just to be on the safe side they avoided the place. Local media could have jokingly issued a vampire warning but I seriously doubt the local authorities did that.

God knows it doesn't take much for me to start mocking my eastern neighbours, but they are not that backward.

On the other hand, a clove of garlic a day keeps doctor and anyone else away. Just to be on the safe side :D

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Garlic is the bomb. I recently knocked-out a cold by taking 6 concentrated(active ingredients) garlic pills.

Recommended dosage was 2, I think.

Figured it wouldn't really hurt me to take 6, and they didn't. It actually busted my cold or whatever I had.

EDIT: Caution, do not do this without taking into consideration as to if your body can handle such a large dose.

Edited by pallidin
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Sava Savanovic, the Serbian vampire: he looks like someones weird uncle... the one that always touches you inappropriately.

post-109094-0-34102300-1353791488_thumb.

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OK, the locals in the one Serbian village swore a vampire is on the loose...in the realm of the paranormal, what we tend not to believe and cannot explain isn't going to solve the mystery on the validity of vampires exist or not. Cultures around the world have stories of cryptozoological creatures they spotted and got in contact with, including Sasquatch in the Pacific Northwest of the USA and modern-day extraterrestrials (the Greys) including the Chupacabra in Latin America.

All we hafta respond to the news report is to keep an open mind, then again vampires still sound like the stuff of legends not fully grounded in reality we feel in the western cultures, whom recently find vampires a trendy niche of romantic wanderlusting beings needing more than blood to fill their physical (and emotional ) needs.

Edited by Tsa-La-Gie Oyate

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My thought's on this story:

- Sava Savanovic, the name sounds a bit unoriginal.

- How do they know he/she is a bad vampire? Famous isn't Infamous.

That is all.

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Have we actually reached the 21st Century yet?

Not all countries have reached the 21st century, or at least there is regions that are some years behind.

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Hi, Boris, it's nice to bump into a fellow countryman on the world wide web. If only we were from the same parallel universe too... because superstition is rampant in this neighbourhood.

Especially in Serbia, have you not heard of "Vlaška magija" (the magic of Vlah people, they brought their beliefs from Romania) and how serious a lot of people takes it still?

(Nothing offensive in that fact, it's part of their heritage and found its way into my heritage too. What not to love about good, old-fashioned vampire story? That has roots in true weird events ;) )

Awesome, you're the first one i've met :). I'm not going to say a word of Croatian in the spirit of good communication and so our fellow "Unexplained Mysterians" can understand us.

I've heard of "Vlaska Magija", but I was referring to the younger generation of Serbs. I'm probably younger than you, so i'm not that familiar with the older generation of Serbs.

On the contrary, i love a good vampire story and i can't wait to see how this plays out :)

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Interesting . . . Croatia was the site of one of the first vampire epidemics of the modern age. In 1672 Giure Grando, late of Khring on the Istrian peninsula, Croatia, apparently returned from the grave and caused many deaths.

The Bosnian "Lampir" is the name of the oldest recorded vampire Meho Lampir.

Giure Grand is kinda the most "famous" vampire in Croatia. What's little known is the supposed existence of "kršnik's"

They're the people who are born during a bad weather. And they're something like vampire hunters. But in their case, they don't fight the vampire as a human but instead their souls leave their body and go to fight vampires. In Medveđe, by Beograd(Serbia) a 50.-year old woman named Milica in the year of 1731/1732 was suspected to have killed 18 people, that was the official report of the village mayor.

It's really quite interesting when you really get into it :)

Edited by BorisIWantToKnow

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