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Karlis

English is a Scandinavian Language

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English is in reality a Scandinavian language.This breaks with what other language researchers believe

"Modern English is a direct descendant of the language of Scandinavians who settled in the British Isles in the course of many centuries, before the French-speaking Normans conquered the country in 1066," says Faarlund. He points out that Old English and Modern English are two very different languages. Why?

"We believe it is because Old English quite simply died out while Scandinavian survived, albeit strongly influenced of course by Old English," he says.

Read more here

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Ok,I haven't looked at the article yet,but I have to say,does this guy have a clue how many Latin words are in the english language.....are there Latin words in scand languages ?

I read it . Japanese and German follow the same grammatical patterns .....Chinese patterns are not exact,but close to English .

I think he smoked something very strong when he came to all these comclusions.

Edited by Simbi Laveau
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This doesn't make much sense to me. Much of the vocabulary of OE still survives in ME, and many of the words that were "pushed aside" by Scandinavian equivalents are still around, albeit with a more specialised meaning (eg. skill-craft).

The article also seems to ignore that while it's true that Old English was an SOV (subject object word) language and English is SVO, they seem to ignore that there was another, highly important SVO language in play: French.

They also seem to ignore Middle English when it suits their purposes.

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Overlooks the obvious... that Old English actually actually transformed Scandivavian languages, and their Syntax??n Middle English bears little relationship to any Scandinavian Language (this is Pre - Norman French)

Edited by keithisco

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Yeah. I'm going to call Bunk on this too. OE is directly related to the Angles and Saxons that came over to England. The Scandinavians that came over to settle came after that, if I remember right. The Germanics came over in the 6th and 7th centuries and the Scandinavians did not show up till the 9th century. And then the Normans showed up in the 11th century. I don't think those two hundred years would have allowed for everyone in England to swap from Celtic or Germanic languages to a Scandinavian language.

I'm going to agree that the language change was in the Scandinavians, not in the English. Christianity probably brought Germanic and Latin influences into Scandinavia.

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English is made up of words from most other European languages. It doesn't have one ancestor, but many.

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lol

post-28065-0-29414300-1354210449_thumb.j

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Yeah I have that graphic and it's true.

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English is a degradation of a more beautiful sounding language that went extinct.

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French and German went extinct?

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French and German went extinct?

Real german language is long dead. Latin alphabet degraded the original languages and scripts of northerners.

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Real german language is long dead. Latin alphabet degraded the original languages and scripts of northerners.

Ah... the REAL German language.

Well supposedly there were Celts living in the Pan-Germanic areas when the Romans were getting started. And then around 500 BC the Germanic speaking peoples moved into the Germanic areas from the North. And displaced the Celtic peoples. The Goths and Vandals that ended up sacking Rome were these new peoples. The origin or germanic languages, and thus the English language is really not that badly documented.

http://en.wikipedia....manic_languages

Edited by DieChecker

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I'm just keeling over laughing at all the different explanations..

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Ah... the REAL German language.

Well supposedly there were Celts living in the Pan-Germanic areas when the Romans were getting started. And then around 500 BC the Germanic speaking peoples moved into the Germanic areas from the North. And displaced the Celtic peoples. The Goths and Vandals that ended up sacking Rome were these new peoples. The origin or germanic languages, and thus the English language is really not that badly documented.

http://en.wikipedia....manic_languages

Supposedly? so you can't verify that they did? i do not see how wikipedia is a valid citation. Its all a big wild guess and since guessing is tool of the trade of scholars. I will also have a big wild guess and say that the scholars did not live in those lands 2500 years ago and could not possibly know what happened there. Citing from so called ancient roman scholars and historians is dodgy at best. Who knows what hidden agenda the romans had.

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Supposedly? so you can't verify that they did? i do not see how wikipedia is a valid citation. Its all a big wild guess and since guessing is tool of the trade of scholars. I will also have a big wild guess and say that the scholars did not live in those lands 2500 years ago and could not possibly know what happened there. Citing from so called ancient roman scholars and historians is dodgy at best. Who knows what hidden agenda the romans had.

OH shut Up.

Keep playing make believe if you like.

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English is the recognised World language,so whats the arguement.Thats because we went world walkabout and taught people how to understand and speak it.All non speaking English Countries are taught English as a second language.

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English is a degradation of a more beautiful sounding language that went extinct.

Yeah, something like this;

Folkspraak is a conlang being designed as a common Germanic language (an "Intergerman", if you will). Once complete, Folkspraak should be quickly learnable by any native speaker of a Germanic language, a group numbering over 465 million native speakers (with an additional 300 to 900 million speaking English as a second language). After many individual different Folksprak varieties for over a decade, since the end of 2010 there is a kind of Standard Folksprak, members agree about. Until now there are already English to Folksprak and Folksprak to English dictionaries available. Folkspraak is not meant to be designed by any one individual, but is a collective work created by all interested parties, according to the charter guidelines. You can contribute a word to the language just by sending an e-mail listing your proposed word, its meaning and its form in three other Germanic languages (in addition to English). You can provide feedback and help design the language as well. For more information, see Conlang Profiles at Langmaker.com.

http://tech.groups.y...oup/folkspraak/

En Grammatik for Folkspraak

This is the Digisk Grammatik von Folkspraak, my attempt to write a grammar for

Folkspraak. That language aims to be a language that most speakers of other Germanic

languages can read, without learning the language. In this way you can write

something in the language, reaching a large group of potential readers.

A problem under which the language suffered, was that it did not have a complete

grammar. It had a simple draft grammar, which was by no means complete or even

accurate. That is the reason why I chose to start all over again and write a new grammar.

This is what has become of it until now.

http://www.irespa.eu...raak_151109.pdf

Grammar:

http://en.wikibooks....lksprak/Grammar

Folkspraak (FS) is an International Auxiliary Language that is currently in development. It is intended to serve as a lingua-franca for communication with speakers of Germanic languages and it is based on features common to the major modern Germanic languages.

The project is intended to be a co-operative and democratic effort by a group of people who currently meet on a Yahoo group. The project to develop Folkspraak has yet to be completed and it is beset with disagreements over such features as phonology, orthography, vocabulary, grammar and syntax. The failure to reach agreement means that there is currently no "official" form of Folkspraak and there are a number of "dialects", which are individual group members´ versions of how they think the language should be.

The primary source languages used for the development of Folkspraak are English, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian Bokmål and Swedish - though some members refer to further languages, such as Frisian, Low German and Norwegian Nynorsk. The divergence of the source languages means it has frequently proven harder than first anticipated to find elements sufficient to operate the language that are truly common to a majority of the source languages.

The Folkspraak described below is the "dialect" of Folkspraak Yahoo member David Parke.

Sample text in Folkspraak

All mensklik wesings âre boren frî on' gelîk in werdigheid on' rejte. Ðê âre begifted mid ferstand on' gewitt on' skulde behandele êlkên in en gêst av brôderhêd.

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

http://www.omniglot..../folkspraak.htm

Links

http://tech.groups.y...lkspraak/links/

Numbers:

http://en.wikibooks....lksprak/Numbers

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English is the recognised World language,so whats the arguement. ...

Well, to anyone who is not interested in etymology, there is no "argument". That said, my guess is that most etymologists would be very much interested in resolving the questions raised in the OP.

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English is NOT Skandinavian,it is comprised of many different Languages melded together over centuries,to form a fundamental language that people understood,caused by invaders/traders and other visitors.There is for example bits of Anglo,Saxon,Viking,Roman,French,incorporated into 1 language.But even today there are many different dialects in England,that sometimes we have difficulty in understanding,unless listened to intently.So the Linguist who brought this up,can Hadaway an divvent tark umptybacked. hahahahahahaha

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why aye mun

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What was the topic of this thread?

Oh yes, about English, the language. Spoken by people in more countries in the world than any other language, the international language of commerce, international travel...

This Scandinavian academic whatever is just plain dirty that no-one wanders around going ABBA and fjord in their daily lives.

English actively welcomes new words and phrases and incorporates them into common usage. That's why it only takes 4 or 5 words in English to say something than 39 in French or German. Or Danish. Or Swedish.

English - the living language.

The others - use English to survive.

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There is a small element of truth in the OP inasmuch that some of the areas held directly under the Danelaw did form the basis of later forms of English, but I believe the effect was minimal. I think spud's post (#19) has it about right. I could nose-dive into my files and concoct an hour-long lecture on this, but I doubt I'd make many friends on the site!

Long Live the Great Vowel Shift!

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What was the topic of this thread?

Oh yes, about English, the language. Spoken by people in more countries in the world than any other language, the international language of commerce, international travel...

This Scandinavian academic whatever is just plain dirty that no-one wanders around going ABBA and fjord in their daily lives.

English actively welcomes new words and phrases and incorporates them into common usage. That's why it only takes 4 or 5 words in English to say something than 39 in French or German. Or Danish. Or Swedish.

English - the living language.

The others - use English to survive.

Let;s see.....

What was the topic of this thread? (7)

Wat was het onderwerp van deze draad?(7)

Oh yes, about English, the language. Spoken by people in more countries in the world than any other language, the international language of commerce, international travel...(26)

O ja, over Engels, de taal. Gesproken door mensen in meer landen in de wereld dan enige ander taal, de internationale handelstaal, internationale reizen...(24)

This Scandinavian academic whatever is just plain dirty that no-one wanders around going ABBA and fjord in their daily lives.(20)

Deze Scandinavische academicus of zo baalt gewoonweg omdat niemand rondzwerft met ABBA en fjord in hun dagelijkse leven.(18)

English actively welcomes new words and phrases and incorporates them into common usage. That's why it only takes 4 or 5 words in English to say something than 39 in French or German. Or Danish. Or Swedish.(38)

Engels verwelkomt aktief nieuwe woorden en frasen en lijft ze voor algemeen gebruik in. Dat is waarom alleen 4 of 5 woorden nodig zijn om iets te zeggen, in plaats van 39 in Frans of Duits. Of Deens. Of Zweeds.(40)

English - the living language.(4)

Engels - de levende taal.(4)

The others - use English to survive.(6)

De anderen - gebruiken Engels om te overleven.(7)

English: 101 words.

Dutch: 100 words.

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Let;s see.....

What was the topic of this thread? (7)

Wat was het onderwerp van deze draad?(7)

Oh yes, about English, the language. Spoken by people in more countries in the world than any other language, the international language of commerce, international travel...(26)

O ja, over Engels, de taal. Gesproken door mensen in meer landen in de wereld dan enige ander taal, de internationale handelstaal, internationale reizen...(24)

This Scandinavian academic whatever is just plain dirty that no-one wanders around going ABBA and fjord in their daily lives.(20)

Deze Scandinavische academicus of zo baalt gewoonweg omdat niemand rondzwerft met ABBA en fjord in hun dagelijkse leven.(18)

English actively welcomes new words and phrases and incorporates them into common usage. That's why it only takes 4 or 5 words in English to say something than 39 in French or German. Or Danish. Or Swedish.(38)

Engels verwelkomt aktief nieuwe woorden en frasen en lijft ze voor algemeen gebruik in. Dat is waarom alleen 4 of 5 woorden nodig zijn om iets te zeggen, in plaats van 39 in Frans of Duits. Of Deens. Of Zweeds.(40)

English - the living language.(4)

Engels - de levende taal.(4)

The others - use English to survive.(6)

De anderen - gebruiken Engels om te overleven.(7)

English: 101 words.

Dutch: 100 words.

Hartelijk dank,Goedenacht .......Vielen dank,Gutenacht.....Is there a bit of German in your Dutch, or a bit of Dutch in your German ?......Thankyou very much,Goodnight

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This entire topic is double Dutch...

and what is this "Hadaway an divvent tark umptybacked" google does not even see what language it is :wacko:

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