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Mentally ill undertreated for physical issues

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Many people with severe mental health problems miss out on the care they should receive for physical illnesses, researchers say.

A British Journal of Psychiatry paper found those with severe mental illness were less likely to get drugs for conditions such as high blood pressure.

*snip*

'It is a scandal that this group of people die on average 20 years younger than the general population, mostly due to preventable physical conditions.'

Full story here: http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-20539159

I have lots to say about this :angry:

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Not all but in some cases it's very difficult for the medical profession to determine what exactly is wrong with someone to start with. Like my late mother-in-law for example, she had dementia and was unable to communicate. On top of that she didn't like 'strangers' handling her and she'd push them away and be very uncooperative. Only because she didn't understand what was happening but it didn't help any, Doctor's rely partly on being told what's wrong and she couldn't tell anyone anything.

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Many people with severe mental health problems miss out on the care they should receive for physical illnesses, researchers say.

A British Journal of Psychiatry paper found those with severe mental illness were less likely to get drugs for conditions such as high blood pressure.

*snip*

'It is a scandal that this group of people die on average 20 years younger than the general population, mostly due to preventable physical conditions.'

Full story here: http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-20539159

I have lots to say about this :angry:

They dont look at their diets either.

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Not all but in some cases it's very difficult for the medical profession to determine what exactly is wrong with someone to start with. Like my late mother-in-law for example, she had dementia and was unable to communicate. On top of that she didn't like 'strangers' handling her and she'd push them away and be very uncooperative. Only because she didn't understand what was happening but it didn't help any, Doctor's rely partly on being told what's wrong and she couldn't tell anyone anything.

With all due respect dementia is not the same as a mental illness, even though they are both treated by the psych teams sometimes. People with dementia cannot express themselves granted, my nan was incoherant towards the end of her life. However someone with a mental illness is not necessarily that incapable of expressing themselves, they are simply sidelined because the general doctor is not a mental health professional and may think they are time wasters or their symptoms are a byproduct of their psych medication. I speak from recent personal experience and am currently in the process of receiving diagnoses of several conditions which I now know I've had for sometime, and I have reported to my General Practioner in the past year. It wasn't until a new doctor joined the medical practice recently and on our first meeting recognised my problems, sent me for tests and has found several life changing illnesses. Needless to say I am furious and upset. My health whether physical or mental is not a lottery! I get more test results on Friday for a condition which could affect my life expectancy. Just because I have been emotional in the past while telling my old doctor how I felt, does not mean she should have ignored my symptoms or put it down to my other meds. Sorry to rant, but not all mentally ill people are inarticulate - but many are misunderstood.

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We simply need more holistic approaches in medicine. Not just how to treat someone with cancer but what in their environment, diet, lifestyle gave it to them. If doctors or teams that support them were better able to integrate background information into their charts then perhaps we could make progress on this front too.

Many dismiss mental illness as a real sickness, they would treat someone in a wheel chair with respect, but disdain the depressed or someone with a worse disorder.

As a result they also dismiss the mentally ill and anything they say is simply not given proper, dignified consideration.

I understand the general population has ages to go before it matures in both provision of information and course of action when it comes to best understanding and interacting with the mentally ill but we should expect more from our primary physicians.

Edited by I believe you
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With all due respect dementia is not the same as a mental illness, even though they are both treated by the psych teams sometimes. People with dementia cannot express themselves granted, my nan was incoherant towards the end of her life. However someone with a mental illness is not necessarily that incapable of expressing themselves,

I said -

Not all but in some cases it's very difficult for the medical profession to determine what exactly is wrong with someone to start with. Like my late mother-in-law for example, she had dementia and was unable to communicate.

Mental illness comes in various forms and dementia is one of them.

The term ‘mental illness’ is generally used when someone experiences significant changes in their thinking, feelings or behaviour. The changes need to be bad enough to affect how the person functions or to cause distress to them or to other people.

http://ispsuk.org/?p=312

As a family we watched her mind deteriorate over the years until eventually we watched her die....literally, we were at her bedside at the time. There's no way she didn't have a mental illness.

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Ok. People with dementia are normally elderly, whereas this article is mainly talking about younger people not being treated early.

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Well, I have issues.

I have high blood pressure, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, PTSD and alcohol substance abuse.

The PTSD is not "military" related. Never was is the "service" Rather, apparently a result of multiple molestations when I was a child, and also being involved(many years later) in an accidental home explosion that nearly costs me and another our lives.

Anyway, my point being is that over these years I have been treated with medications, and, as I mentioned, drinking.

Curiously I was most concerned with high blood pressure(knowing it's dangers for stroke and such), and am grateful that I seem to be under the proper meds for that.

The anxiety/panic disorder is FINALLY under control, after many years, trying many meds, and seeing many docs.

I would like to express my sympathy for anyone who has suffered like I have. It CAN take a long time to find what works for YOU.

What I can say is that I did not give-up, and all seems well now.

Edited by pallidin

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