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Waspie_Dwarf

NASA to launch new Mars rover in 2020

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NASA Announces Robust Multi-Year Mars Program; New Rover to Close Out Decade of New Missions

Dec. 04, 2012

Dwayne Brown/Sarah DeWitt

Headquarters, Washington

202/358-1726/358-2451

dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov/ sarah.l.dewitt@nasa.gov

RELEASE : 12-420

NASA Announces Robust Multi-Year Mars Program; New Rover to Close Out Decade of New Missions

WASHINGTON -- Building on the success of Curiosity's Red Planet landing, NASA has announced plans for a robust multi-year Mars program, including a new robotic science rover set to launch in 2020. This announcement affirms the agency's commitment to a bold exploration program that meets our nation's scientific and human exploration objectives.

"The Obama administration is committed to a robust Mars exploration program," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. "With this next mission, we're ensuring America remains the world leader in the exploration of the Red Planet, while taking another significant step toward sending humans there in the 2030s."

The planned portfolio includes the Curiosity and Opportunity rovers; two NASA spacecraft and contributions to one European spacecraft currently orbiting Mars; the 2013 launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) orbiter to study the Martian upper atmosphere; the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission, which will take the first look into the deep interior of Mars; and participation in ESA's 2016 and 2018 ExoMars missions, including providing "Electra" telecommunication radios to ESA's 2016 mission and a critical element of the premier astrobiology instrument on the 2018 ExoMars rover.

The plan to design and build a new Mars robotic science rover with a launch in 2020 comes only months after the agency announced InSight, which will launch in 2016, bringing a total of seven NASA missions operating or being planned to study and explore our Earth-like neighbor.

The 2020 mission will constitute another step toward being responsive to high-priority science goals and the president's challenge of sending humans to Mars orbit in the 2030s.

The future rover development and design will be based on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) architecture that successfully carried the Curiosity rover to the Martian surface this summer. This will ensure mission costs and risks are as low as possible, while still delivering a highly capable rover with a proven landing system. The mission will constitute a vital component of a broad portfolio of Mars exploration missions in development for the coming decade.

The mission will advance the science priorities of the National Research Council's 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey and responds to the findings of the Mars Program Planning Group established earlier this year to assist NASA in restructuring its Mars Exploration Program.

"The challenge to restructure the Mars Exploration Program has turned from the seven minutes of terror for the Curiosity landing to the start of seven years of innovation," NASA's associate administrator for science, and astronaut John Grunsfeld said. "This mission concept fits within the current and projected Mars exploration budget, builds on the exciting discoveries of Curiosity, and takes advantage of a favorable launch opportunity."

The specific payload and science instruments for the 2020 mission will be openly competed, following the Science Mission Directorate's established processes for instrument selection. This process will begin with the establishment of a science definition team that will be tasked to outline the scientific objectives for the mission.

This mission fits within the five-year budget plan in the president's Fiscal Year 2013 budget request, and is contingent on future appropriations.

Plans also will include opportunities for infusing new capabilities developed through investments by NASA's Space Technology Program, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, and contributions from international partners.

For information about NASA Mars activities, visit:

Additional information about Armstrong is available on the Web at:

http://www.nasa.gov/mars

- end -

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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Waspie what do you think of a MarsOne project? By the time NASA will send their rover the Marsone project will be already in motion, based on their projects timeline.

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They should be sending supplies there already for a manned mission.

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They should be sending supplies there already for a manned mission.

Of course! IMO they are just wasting money, time and brain power with these toys. If we really want to learn something about Mars we should send people and equipment there. They should stop financing this rubbish and concentrate on a manned mission to Mars and BACK. With the technology available I'm convinced it is possible. NASA please make the next "giant step"!

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Waspie what do you think of a MarsOne project? By the time NASA will send their rover the Marsone project will be already in motion, based on their projects timeline.

In my opinion MarsOne has slightly less chance of getting of the ground than an ostrich.

I think they are hugely underestimating the complexities and therefore the costs of getting a manned mission to Mars and regularly restocking the colonists with food . We have no idea whether it will be possible to grow food on Mars. There are still too many unknowns about how the human body will cope with exposure to reduced gravity. Curiosity is the largest object ever landed on Mars. MarsOne would require vehicles considerably more massive and occurring regularly.

I will be amazed of MarsOne amounts to anything, but I'll be overjoyed to be proved wrong.

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Its our mission as Humans to Explore ,Mars Will be a great place to See where we can go ! Like they say "JUST DO IT " Print more money,send man to Mars See what comes of it !

THis is the way we all should look at Growth! By setting Goals proceeding and then on to the Next Missions ! We might just figure out how to get along on this planet along the way !

Common Goals uncommon Dreams ! :tsu:

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