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The Blob

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William B Stoecker: The Blob, a horror film starring a young Steve McQueen, came out in 1958. The film begins with an old man watching a meteorite fall to Earth. He goes to investigate, and prods the meteorite with a stick, whereupon it breaks open and a small, living blob leaps onto his hand, and begins to consume him, growing steadily larger, until he is completely eaten alive. The blob then eats the doctor and nurse who had tried to treat him, and goes on from there, consuming more and more victims and growing steadily larger, seemingly indestructible, until, finally, the heroes of the story discover that it can be frozen solid with CO2 fire extinguishers. It is then dropped onto the Arctic ice, to await a sequel that never came.

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I don't remember the exact date, but I lived in Frisco, Texas during 1977 and 1978. I know it was those years because I went to 5th grade in the city.

We had the jellies in our yard one morning and were told later in the day that they were the result of the battery plant down the road. Though, no mention was ever made of what the jelly actually was or how it had flown or sublimated back into a solid at that distance from the plant.

I can't be more exact on the date than that, but I do know it was in either 77 or 78 because we moved in late 78.

Either that or there was more than one jelly occurrence.

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I can't remember what it was called, but a couple of years ago I watched a program where it was claimed that human DNA had be discovered in either a blob sample or a fall of red rain, and that further testing would be conducted. Sadly, I've been unable to find any follow up to that claim.

If it was true, then the implication would be both interesting and unsettling.

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It's water retention granules. Tiny sugar-like grains when dry but they expand many times and become translucent when wet. Gardeners use them to keep soil or compost moist for plants during the summer and the dry grains are easily spread.

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