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Video game violence

Do video games contribute to violence?   77 members have voted

  1. 1. Do video games contribute to violence?

    • Yes
      6
    • No
      39
    • They might influence to a certain degree, but you don't suddenly forget the difference between right and wrong
      32

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75 posts in this topic

With the US shooting the debate around video game violence has regained attention. I was wondering what everyone's insight is on this topic.

Some articles that might be of interest for argumentation:

Shooting renews argument over video-game violence

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iV5PLztDeORnBW9u_hpanUr6sg4w?docId=093ad8320099466f82b21e3dd4ed7dc4

Power in Games: Why Game Violence is a Red Herring

http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/TaekwanKim/20121219/183838/Power_in_Games_Why_Game_Violence_is_a_Red_Herring.php

Do violent video games lead to real violence?

electronics.howstuffworks.com/video-game-violence.htm

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Only as much as every other piece of Media. Art depicts violence, as does literature, film and music and yet it always comes back to video games.

I think there's a high correlation between troubled teens and seclusion and in seclusion, gaming is a great escape and real-life substitute both visually and as a stimulant and so the mere fact that some messed up kids play games and then go on a shooting spree is probably because they were messed up in the first place. (Although I'd bet one or two nut-bars got a little inspiration from a game..and film,book and painting)

'See that guy who shoot up that mall? yeah did you know he was an avid reader of the Peter Pan books?!'

'Srsly?!1'

'Ya'

'They must be the cause of this whole mess, BAN PETER PAN, BAN PETER PAN.'

We look for reasons and patterns on which to blame to nasty things in life without realising that they've been festering in our heads all along.

Edited by Sean93
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If a person is really that weak, gullible, impressionable and totally out of control with their impulses that they are moved to commit acts of murder because of something they seen on a screen, read in a book, heard in a song or just eavesdropping then they already had a problem long ago.

Lethanial is right, it is always easy to blame outside sources, acting as if we are so weak and vulnerable that we cannot possibly control ourselves and that we are just mere pawns, reacting to whatever we see or hear without any will of our own.

Yes..I agree that individuals need to be far more responsible for their actions and stop acting like they were helpless pawns once they got caught red-handed. (Yes, I am aware there are exceptions but I am speaking in general terms here.)

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Violent games doesn't make people violent, people get drawn towards the things they like. Just because people play it does not mean they will do it unless they have issues. If a person gets influenced by something that easy, it's a personal problem not a media problem. Ok maybe If the majority of the population who played violent video games went out and GTA/Manhunt'ed everything then maybe you could blame video games.

People just want to blame something for things they cannot understand. Just a witch hunt.

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I posted this video before on a different thread. It's an experiment to see if video games involving shooting are 'mass shooting simulators/trainers'.

From Penn & Teller's: Bullsh!t.

http://youtu.be/80hSXb5QRis

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My ten year old son is playing Black Ops 2 as I type this. I have no concern for his ability to be responsible. But I am blessed with a great child. Not everyone is.

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Penn&Teller :tsu:

Anyway:

Why Video Games Don't Correlate to Gun Violence

26ae3fa8e130bd1a591e5bad36638189_623x330.jpeg

Fisher shows that the trend line for the graph actually has a downward slope, meaning more video games do not mean more gun violence. The graph also goes on to show how much of an outlier the United States is when it comes to gun-related murders.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/national/2012/12/video-games-gun-violence-chart/60079/

Ten-country comparison suggests there’s little or no link between video games and gun murders

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2012/12/17/ten-country-comparison-suggests-theres-little-or-no-link-between-video-games-and-gun-murders/

Look at Korea. South-Korea has a game culture like you wouldn't believe. You're treated like Justin Bieber over there if you're a gamer.

And no higher gun related assaults that correlate with that. What can be said is that it's prohibited for a civilian to own a gun there.....

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Penn&Teller :tsu:

Anyway:

Why Video Games Don't Correlate to Gun Violence

26ae3fa8e130bd1a591e5bad36638189_623x330.jpeg

http://www.theatlant...ce-chart/60079/

Ten-country comparison suggests there’s little or no link between video games and gun murders

http://www.washingto...nd-gun-murders/

Look at Korea. South-Korea has a game culture like you wouldn't believe. You're treated like Justin Bieber over there if you're a gamer.

And no higher gun related assaults that correlate with that. What can be said is that it's prohibited for a civilian to own a gun there.....

The graph is interesting. A good illustration of what is obvious to everyone - except more than a few Americans.

It's not about guns. It's not about video games, or TV violence, or just about any other social factor that can be dreamed up.

It's about Americans.

(sorry, but there's no nice way of saying it)

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Maybe video games is more of an outlet and with out them more nuts would be doing it for real.

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My kid is playing Black Ops 2 again. He just turned it back on since my last post 27hrs ago. The last time he played. Should I be seeking help for him. Possibly medication ?

Oh hes 10. Cant wait much longer to address this issue.

Edited by AsteroidX

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I play video games fairly often. I think some of them are a good challenging thing to try. I'm also working hard and learning to play the drums. I doubt video games would suddenly make me want to be violent and shoot people. I've never played a game shooting game and wished I could go do that in real life.

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I've played violent games all the way since doom back when I was 6. I haven't gone on any massacres or attacking people so video games are just a scapegoat for when these situations occur.

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A virtual world is different from a physical weapon.

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It seems likely, but not certain, that violent video games would be some sort of factor in the final equation. I think I've read that the military uses shooting video games as some sort of assessment tool for potential recruits.

If killing people becomes part of a game, can that attitude be transferred to real life?

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It seems likely, but not certain, that violent video games would be some sort of factor in the final equation. I think I've read that the military uses shooting video games as some sort of assessment tool for potential recruits.

Not, video games are not used as potential recruiting material for the military. My brother has been an Army recruiter for the better part of his career after spending 8 years in the infantry.

5 years as a recruiter, 2 years as a recruiting station commander, and is now actively recruiting or AMEDD.

Do they use sims in training? Yes.

Do they use sims as a method of recruiting? No.

There has to be a disconnect between simulation and real world. That is where MILES come in.

If killing people becomes part of a game, can that attitude be transferred to real life?

There is the potential for it to be a possibility. However, it all stems back to parenting does it not?

We live in a day and age where technology pretty much encompass every facet of our lives. There seems to be a lot of disconnect between the parents and children due to it. When I was growing up, there wasn't much to watch on TV, computers had no access to internet just BBS, and video games were limited to 8bit nintendo.

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My kid played NFL 2006 for 45 minutes. He won he super bowl but that game is so so violent. Just like American football. All that hing. Shud I take it away from him ?

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My kid played NFL 2006 for 45 minutes. He won he super bowl but that game is so so violent. Just like American football. All that hing. Shud I take it away from him ?

American Football is Violent?

Holy crap, have to seen videos of the AFL (Australia Football League)?

I never knew that any professional sports league legalized that kind of destructive assault.(sarcasm)

Edited by RaptorBites

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Needs to be added to any ban list Id say then especially off the tele where kids might see it. 21 and over to enter and must pass a background check and psychological testing before being a pass in. You know cant have anyone hit over the head with a bottle or kids seeing that !! :gun:

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It's about Americans.

(sorry, but there's no nice way of saying it)

While I'm inclined to agree on some levels... Let's not forget the millions of loving and concerned people here.

There is a smoking gun baried somewhere in the chaos.

Like most really bad things it's probably a perfect storm of a few factors that include all of the suggestions.

Edited by Seeker79
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I've played violent games all the way since doom back when I was 6. I haven't gone on any massacres or attacking people so video games are just a scapegoat for when these situations occur.

I highly agree with you Iv been playing games since about the same age you said and I think people just use it as a scapegoat.

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While I'm inclined to agree on some levels... Let's not forget the millions of loving and concerned people here.

There is a smoking gun baried somewhere in the chaos.

Like most really bad things it's probably a perfect storm of a few factors that include all of the suggestions.

Absolutely. And I don't want to offend American members. But reading through all the threads about the recent murders, and previous threads concerning gun control, it's pretty clear that whilst the majority of American gun owners are perfectly decent people who take their resposibilities seriously; there also appears to be some serious denial about the causes of these atrocities. The way some people talk on these boards it's as if they cannot comprehend that this is an 'American' phenomenon (not exclusively, sure), and the prevailing attitude appears to be "there's nothing to be done about it. Crazy people are going to do crazy things".

Many nations have guns. Lots of kids playing violent videogames everywhere. But nowhere does this happen as it does in the US.

One of the arguments against gun control is that if someone is deranged enough to slaughter strangers, then they will find an alternative method. But in countries where guns are not as readily available we don't see the crazies letting off pipe bombs in schools and shopping malls.

For every factor that people bring up as being possibly influential, not one is unique to the US. But still, America appears to have almost cornered the market in mass murders.

The only factor I can see that is exclusive to America, is Americans. Once they accept this, then they may start to have some meaningful dialogue about how to reduce it. But I don't think any knee-jerk reaction or gun control measures will work. I believe that for any change to occur it will need to come from the bottom up. I think Americans need to re-evaluate their relationship with firearms, and how this fits with the historical context and their sense of national identity.

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Here's a great example:

http://www.washingto...n-every-school/

The NRA think the solution is more guns. Armed guards in schools. Seriously? Do Americans want that? And why stop at schools? Clearly, using the same logic, you need armed guards in cinemas and shopping malls. And, would you still call this freedom?

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I took one away from my kids, because everytime they would play it they would end up in a fight. I used to wait until they and the wife were asleep so i could play it.

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Parents need to take blame for their poor skills. Video games may influence a younger person to a certain degree but those kind of games are not meant for younger children. Parents need to take responsibility for their children instead of always finding a new scapegoat. MA is only for those 17 or older, not for 10 year old kids whose parents buy "little johnnie" whatever he wants. I believe it should be a finable offense for parents to buy their children MA games. Most parents monitor internet activity to ensure LJ doesn't visit porn sites but allow him unrestricted access to an online video game. The online community for gaming consoles can be a very relaxing place to hang out with virtual friends but it generally is not a place for children.

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