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Still Waters

The Brontosaurus never existed

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It may have something to do with all those Brontosaurus burgers everyone's favorite modern stone-age family ate, but when you think of a giant dinosaur with a tiny head and long, swooping tail, the Brontosaurus is probably what you're seeing in your mind.

Well hold on: Scientifically speaking, there's no such thing as a Brontosaurus.

Even if you knew that, you may not know how the fictional dinosaur came to star in the prehistoric landscape of popular imagination for so long.

http://www.npr.org/2...ted?ft=1&f=1007

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NPR.org? Never even heard of it. Is it like The Onion?

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What people think of as the Brontosaurus existed, but it was really an Apatosaurus.

More of a synonym at this point, at least in popular culture.

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Well..it is quite possible the Brontosaurus never existed. After all, these fossils have undergone many reconstructions over the years especially when more complete skeletons were uncovered.

I'm not really surprised though.

Maybe someday we'll find that the T-Rex never existed either (could happen)

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Who came up with the idea of giving a name to something that didn't exist ? Why call Hamburghers, Ham when there is no such creature ?

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Just don't tell me Santa Claus doesn't exist.

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Yeah right, next thing I'm going to be told is that Pluto's not a planet.

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NPR.org? Never even heard of it. Is it like The Onion?

National Public Radio, I believe. It's like America's CBC.

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I remember hearing about this a while ago. Bound to happen I suppose when it comes to extinct animals.

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See? Proof that these Evolutionists have been lying all along. :innocent:

Who came up with the idea of giving a name to something that didn't exist ? Why call Hamburghers, Ham when there is no such creature ?

I presume it's after the city, like Frankfurters.

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Thats interesting

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See? Proof that these Evolutionists have been lying all along. :innocent:

I presume it's after the city, like Frankfurters.

Sorry Bro Hamburghers were not invented in Hamburg, they first turned up in the U.S.A.

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Brontosaurus was a made up name for the Flintstones..

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Sorry Bro Hamburghers were not invented in Hamburg, they first turned up in the U.S.A.

Oh, it was invented in the U.S., like the Balti was invented in England, but

220px-Hamburg_Rathaus.jpg

magnify-clip.pngThe Hamburger is named after Hamburg, Germany

The term hamburger originally derives from Hamburg,[2] Germany's second largest city, from which many people emigrated to the United States. In High German, Burg means fortified settlement or fortified refuge; and is a widespread component of place names. Hamburger can be a descriptive noun in German, referring to someone from Hamburg (compare London → Londoner) or an adjective describing something from Hamburg. Similarly, frankfurter and wiener, names for other meat-based foods, are also used in Germany and Austria as descriptive nouns for people and as adjectives for things from the cities of Frankfurt and Wien (Vienna), respectively. The term "burger" is associated with many different types of sandwiches similar to a (ground beef) hamburger, using different meats, such as a buffalo burger, venison, kangaroo, turkey, elk, lamb, salmon burger or veggie burger.[3]

... sorry, Pedant mode is now off.

:santa:

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Well, many believe that the Hamburger derived from this hamburgian snack:

rundstueck-warm.jpg

Rundstück warm. It is also available with a flat meatball (Frikadelle).

Former inhabitants of Hamburg supposedly brought this to the States, and it finally became the Hamburger we now know.

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Oh, it was invented in the U.S., like the Balti was invented in England, but

220px-Hamburg_Rathaus.jpg

magnify-clip.pngThe Hamburger is named after Hamburg, Germany

The term hamburger originally derives from Hamburg,[2] Germany's second largest city, from which many people emigrated to the United States. In High German, Burg means fortified settlement or fortified refuge; and is a widespread component of place names. Hamburger can be a descriptive noun in German, referring to someone from Hamburg (compare London → Londoner) or an adjective describing something from Hamburg. Similarly, frankfurter and wiener, names for other meat-based foods, are also used in Germany and Austria as descriptive nouns for people and as adjectives for things from the cities of Frankfurt and Wien (Vienna), respectively. The term "burger" is associated with many different types of sandwiches similar to a (ground beef) hamburger, using different meats, such as a buffalo burger, venison, kangaroo, turkey, elk, lamb, salmon burger or veggie burger.[3]

... sorry, Pedant mode is now off.

:santa:

So now we know which people Soylent Green is! :innocent:

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Well, many believe that the Hamburger derived from this hamburgian snack:

rundstueck-warm.jpg

Rundstück warm. It is also available with a flat meatball (Frikadelle).

Former inhabitants of Hamburg supposedly brought this to the States, and it finally became the Hamburger we now know.

wow, does that thing still have a pulse !??

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Well, many believe that the Hamburger derived from this hamburgian snack:

rundstueck-warm.jpg

Rundstück warm. It is also available with a flat meatball (Frikadelle).

Former inhabitants of Hamburg supposedly brought this to the States, and it finally became the Hamburger we now know.

There's one crucial difference with that from the hamburger: that has real meat in it. :)

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NPR.org? Never even heard of it. Is it like The Onion?

NPR= National Public Radio .

Completely legit . More like Reuters than the onion

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