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Child of Bast

America Unearthed

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"The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla."

Does that resemble any name of a tribe in Florida or Georgia that you know of, Lightly?

Yes. Let me explain a bit. There were a couple of groups of Chontal Maya. The Yokot'an are the group where the Yucatan gets its name from. Another group of Chontal were called the Poton. (Sometimes spelled Putun.) The name of the province in Mexico where they lived was called Acala.

When the first Spanish entered Florida they found three groups of people living around Lake Okeechobee: Mayaimi, Mayaka, and Mayayuaka. Just north of Lake Okeechobee they entered a province named Ocala and found two groups living there. One named Potani and the other named Uqueten.

Thus there were people called Maya living around Lake Okeechobee. And there was a province called Ocala with tribes named Potani and Uqueten living in Florida just as there was a province called Acala with tribes named Poton and Yokot'an living in it in Mexico.

You can read more of my research on this matter here:

http://lostworlds.org/maya-mining-gold-georgia/

To read more of my research on this topic visit:

http://www.MayaInAmerica.com

http://lostworlds.org/category/maya-in-america/

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I thought it was most interesting when this first came out that all of the archeologists yip yapped in unison - Not true, we never found the simalarity of language before. Well guys did you ever think that the language similarities were found by a professor who just happened to be a Native American Crow and who just happened to be translating Mayan text. I wonder if it ever dawned on them those two abilities in an archeolgy professor didn't happen every day?

Their second yap was Mayans couldn't have made it to Georgia. I believe Thor Heyerdahl proved the Egyptians could have made it to the Americas in their reed boats - and they dont'think the Mayans could have made to Georgia?

I have a good friend who is active in her Native American culture and when I sent her the first article, her response was, "Well we have always known that, anyone can see the similarities in the snake monuments, etc. It just seems no one ever thought to ask the Native Americans what they see. Typical.

The migration legends of many southeastern tribes claim they came from someplace else. The Kasihta Creek migration legend includes references to earthquakes and volcanoes. The Hitchiti Creek migration says they arrived on the shore of Florida from a "place of reeds." Place of Reeds is a known Mayan euphemism for a large city. The Cherokee claim that foreign priests who spoke an unknown language resided atop the mounds and the Cherokee warriors eventually massacred them and their families because of all the abuses they suffered from these foreigners.

But white anthropologists think they know more than the very people they are studying and so dismiss these oral histories as fanciful myths with no basis in reality.

You can learn more about my research on these migration legends at my website:

http://lostworlds.org/maya-mining-gold-georgia/

http://lostworlds.org/muskogee-creek-indians-west-mexico/

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Have not had the time to fully evaluate your complete presentation. Nor can Meso-American influences on latter/late Woodland/ Mississippian cultures be ruled out as per latter period southwestern research.

Would, however, wish to bring to your attention a matter related to the above segment. Current research would tend to favor a volcanic causation for the "536 AD" event:

http://www.uibk.ac.a...n-et-al-grl.pdf

The above (2008) does not include the more recent research by Dull, et. al. (2010), which provides additional support in regards to the volcanic causation.

The interpretation of petroglyphs, particularly those of uncertain provenience/age/cultural affiliation, has a tendency to be, at its best, quite speculative.

.

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Yes. Let me explain a bit. There were a couple of groups of Chontal Maya. The Yokot'an are the group where the Yucatan gets its name from. Another group of Chontal were called the Poton. (Sometimes spelled Putun.) The name of the province in Mexico where they lived was called Acala.

When the first Spanish entered Florida they found three groups of people living around Lake Okeechobee: Mayaimi, Mayaka, and Mayayuaka. Just north of Lake Okeechobee they entered a province named Ocala and found two groups living there. One named Potani and the other named Uqueten.

Thus there were people called Maya living around Lake Okeechobee. And there was a province called Ocala with tribes named Potani and Uqueten living in Florida just as there was a province called Acala with tribes named Poton and Yokot'an living in it in Mexico.

You can read more of my research on this matter here:

http://lostworlds.or...g-gold-georgia/

To read more of my research on this topic visit:

http://www.MayaInAmerica.com

http://lostworlds.or...aya-in-america/

Man, that was great ! Thanks.

+++

EDIT:

And I see that you think what I have also thought: that Cahokia might have been a Mayan city:

http://lostworlds.org/tag/cahokia/

.

Edited by Abramelin

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very interesting Abramelin, i like this bit from your linked PDF : "This discussion of prehistoric Indian mounds has been centered on the Florida Indians, with emphasis on the Calusa, as geographically the nearest and most probable point of contact. However, it should be noted that similar prehistoric mound building was practiced by Indians who peopled the Mississippi drainage plain (consequently known as the Mississippian culture) as far north as Illinois and Ohio (Swanton 1946). The current consensus is that the Mississippian mound building preceded that of the mound builders in Florida, but this study suggests that the first mounds, influenced by the Maya, were built by the Calusa and the mound building culture moved north at a later date. As noted earlier this agrees with Sears s (1982) findings that the cultivation of maize first appeared in the Calusa area then moved north to the Mississippi plain. "

... here are examples of Mississipian platform mound post-86645-0-32805600-1356563642_thumb.j and early Mayan platform mound post-86645-0-31394400-1356563558_thumb.j

Pretty similar huh?

might as well add link:

http://www.examiner....ya-architecture

The problem I have with this is that mounds in the US easily predate the existence of the Mayans. For example, Poverty Point in Louisiana contains at least six earthen mounds that date between 1650 BC and 700 BC, long before the Mayans ever came around.

Watson Brake, another archaeological site in Louisiana, is even older. It is considered the earliest mound complex in North America, dating back to 3500 BC.

If there is a connection between the Mississippian mound builders and the Mayans, I think it is more likely that there was sustained trade and cultural contact between the two groups, but one didn't birth the other. The transfer of ideas, beliefs, art, and tools through trade could explain the apparent similarities between the two cultures. They are after all, not very far apart.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty_point

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watson_Brake

I know those links are from Wikipedia, but Wiki is great for basic info gathering.

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The problem I have with this is that mounds in the US easily predate the existence of the Mayans. For example, Poverty Point in Louisiana contains at least six earthen mounds that date between 1650 BC and 700 BC, long before the Mayans ever came around.

Watson Brake, another archaeological site in Louisiana, is even older. It is considered the earliest mound complex in North America, dating back to 3500 BC.

If there is a connection between the Mississippian mound builders and the Mayans, I think it is more likely that there was sustained trade and cultural contact between the two groups, but one didn't birth the other. The transfer of ideas, beliefs, art, and tools through trade could explain the apparent similarities between the two cultures. They are after all, not very far apart.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Poverty_point

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Watson_Brake

I know those links are from Wikipedia, but Wiki is great for basic info gathering.

Perhaps that means the culture of the Mayans came down to Mexico by way of Louisiana?

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When the first Spanish entered Florida they found three groups of people living around Lake Okeechobee: Mayaimi, Mayaka, and Mayayuaka. Just north of Lake Okeechobee they entered a province named Ocala and found two groups living there. One named Potani and the other named Uqueten.

Thus there were people called Maya living around Lake Okeechobee. And there was a province called Ocala with tribes named Potani and Uqueten living in Florida just as there was a province called Acala with tribes named Poton and Yokot'an living in it in Mexico.

But, might not those people be a left over of colonization, and not the result of migration?

Also couldn't it be a matter of reusing historic names? Atlanta Georgia has nothing to do with Atlantis, but the names are similar.

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Perhaps that means the culture of the Mayans came down to Mexico by way of Louisiana?

I don't know about that, but it made me flash on what the Aztec said about their original home - Aztlan.

It was an island surrounded by swamp.

Sounds like the Bayou to me! LOL

Harte

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The problem I have with this is that mounds in the US easily predate the existence of the Mayans. For example, Poverty Point in Louisiana contains at least six earthen mounds that date between 1650 BC and 700 BC, long before the Mayans ever came around.

Watson Brake, another archaeological site in Louisiana, is even older. It is considered the earliest mound complex in North America, dating back to 3500 BC.

If there is a connection between the Mississippian mound builders and the Mayans, I think it is more likely that there was sustained trade and cultural contact between the two groups, but one didn't birth the other. The transfer of ideas, beliefs, art, and tools through trade could explain the apparent similarities between the two cultures. They are after all, not very far apart.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Poverty_point

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Watson_Brake

I know those links are from Wikipedia, but Wiki is great for basic info gathering.

Heh, I found your other website, Lost Knowledge:

http://therealmayanprophecies.com/why-the-maya-calendar-starts-in-3114-bc/#.UOGDl6whZag

Someone in another forum here (Astronomy) suggested that the Maya Calendar may have started with the sighting of some comet, and when I googled I ended up on that site.

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The problem I have with this is that mounds in the US easily predate the existence of the Mayans. For example, Poverty Point in Louisiana contains at least six earthen mounds that date between 1650 BC and 700 BC, long before the Mayans ever came around.

Watson Brake, another archaeological site in Louisiana, is even older. It is considered the earliest mound complex in North America, dating back to 3500 BC.

If there is a connection between the Mississippian mound builders and the Mayans, I think it is more likely that there was sustained trade and cultural contact between the two groups, but one didn't birth the other. The transfer of ideas, beliefs, art, and tools through trade could explain the apparent similarities between the two cultures. They are after all, not very far apart.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Poverty_point

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Watson_Brake

I know those links are from Wikipedia, but Wiki is great for basic info gathering.

Thanks Lost Knowledge, Good to have you here. "Sustained contact" .. i like that. I suppose the peopling of the Americas was a much more complex and multi directional process than is currently fully understood ? With people moving back and forth in all directions? Cultures must have changed in TIME as cultures do. Basically the same people could have become known by different names , then and now, as cultures changed and moved about ?

The difference between an 'Olmec' and a 'Mayan' might be, more than anything else, .. time?

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Thanks for all the input about a television show.

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Sorry we wondered off TOPIC Lady Kasey... it seems that's what we do as interesting ideas are interjected and interesting facts are exchanged. I didn't see the show myself.

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Thanks Lost Knowledge, Good to have you here. "Sustained contact" .. i like that. I suppose the peopling of the Americas was a much more complex and multi directional process than is currently fully understood ? With people moving back and forth in all directions? Cultures must have changed in TIME as cultures do. Basically the same people could have become known by different names , then and now, as cultures changed and moved about ?

The difference between an 'Olmec' and a 'Mayan' might be, more than anything else, .. time?

Absolutely. There is so much we don't know about the ancient history of the Americas because of the lack of a historical record. For example, just look at how complex the barbarian migrations of bronze age Europe were. I have no doubt that we have a simplified understanding of the settling and migrations of ancient America.

Heh, I found your other website, Lost Knowledge:

http://therealmayanp...c/#.UOGDl6whZag

Someone in another forum here (Astronomy) suggested that the Maya Calendar may have started with the sighting of some comet, and when I googled I ended up on that site.

Thanks for the link. I was mostly referring to the start of Mayan civilization, the beginnings of the Mayan culture and people could be much older. I just have doubts that they started the Mound Builder culture or vice versa.

Thanks for all the input about a television show.

Sorry, I can get caught up in an interesting topic sometimes. :unsure2:

I've seen both episodes so far and I treat it the same way I treat shows like Ancient Aliens. I watch them to learn new interesting ideas, theories, etc. that I hadn't heard before, but it can be hard to take seriously sometimes (that music!).

Edited by Lost Knowledge

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