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Horror Movies, Do You Like Them?

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Occassionally I may contribute some Turner Classic Movies horror programming like here:

Tomorrow Friday January 18th, TCM Underground will be featuring:

The Baby (1973) @ 11:00PM

The Bad Seed (1956) @ 12:30AM

The Baby is one of those little creepy b-movies that shouldnt be missed.

Wednesday January 23

The Sadist (1963) @ 4:30AM

The Terror (1963) @ 6:15AM

The Reptile (1966) @ 7:45AM

The Nanny (1965) @ 9:30AM

The Mummy (1959) @ 11:15AM

The Body Snatcher (1945) @ 1:15PM

The Haunting (1963) @ 3:00PM

What a nice line-up, three Hammer films, 2 Robert Wise horrors, 1 Roger Corman, and 1 Arch Hall Jr role that horror/thriller fans shouldnt miss. My two favorite Val Lewton produced films are Cat People (Jacques Tourneur) and The Body Snatcher (Robert Wise). Cabman Gray is one of Boris Karloff's finest wickedest horror roles. In fact, my two favorite Val Lewton directors are Jacques Tourneur and Robert Wise whom went on to offer us Night Of The Demon and The Haunting.

All times are Pacific. Check local listings.

Edited by B Jenkins

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I may see if I can get these or not. If not, there is always NetFlix or finding DVDs.

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I may see if I can get these or not. If not, there is always NetFlix or finding DVDs.

Hmm, where do I begin, there are some really awesome classic horror films that put todays to absolutely shame. You may have seen some of these but here goes it.

Boris Karloff's finest horror roles are his monster role form the Frankenstein trilogy (Bride of, Son of).

Hjalmar Poelzig from The Black Cat (1934), where Karloff is a war veteran Satanist who keeps his dead girlfriends preserved in glass (a suggestive subtext of **********) and the film also features one of Bela Lugosi's best roles as Dr. Vitus Werdegast, another bent war veteran character who's petrified of cats and a sworn enemy of Poelzig.

Cabman John Gray from The Body Snatcher (1945), Karloff portrays quite delightfully a Burke and Hare -type villainy.

Other classics were checking into:

Island Of Lost Souls (1932), Charles Laughton is a hoot as Moreau who among other thing attempts to breed his panther woman with a human castaway. The best and most bent film adaptation of H.G. Wells' Island Of Dr Moreau.

Mad Love (1935), Peter Lorre is a fiendish stalker that even keeps a life-size wax work of his subject.

Cat People (1942), an ancient village curse brought on by Satanists manifests itself in contemporary times with tragic results. The final twenty minutes of the film represent some of the finest suspense-filled horror I have ever seen.

Peeping Tom (1960), a serial killer who records his victim's fear with a camera while he kills them. This film was too ahead of its time for its subjective cinematography and tragic portrayal of a serial killer's childhood. It was largely panned by the critics of its day and ruined director Michael Powell's career forever. Now recognized as a genre landmark film.

If you want more just let me know.

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While there are many films listed in this thread that I enjoy... as a rule I do not care for horror movies as such... they just don't frighten me... at best they "startle me" ...

But I do feel that horror that appens just off camera - out of the audiences view - is much more terrifying/suspenceful than just putting it in your face...

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No one's mentioned Friday The 13TH?!

Now, it's gone on forever, and I haven't see those beyond the third one (in 3-d!), but I think the first two had pretty good stories.

Also, I think it's one of the best titles, and it has a really good score.

For me, it's the one that can still come to mind whenever I'm out in the woods...not necessarily there camping, but just there in the woods!

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While there are many films listed in this thread that I enjoy... as a rule I do not care for horror movies as such... they just don't frighten me... at best they "startle me" ...

But I do feel that horror that appens just off camera - out of the audiences view - is much more terrifying/suspenceful than just putting it in your face...

Most horror films today rely upon jumpscares through booming music stings and quiet moments broken by very loud thunderous noises. If not that, it is gratuitous violence or gross-out gore.

That is why I mostly prefer the substance and craft of the classic horror movies as the characters and story can truly be engaging rather than a high bodycount of cyphers (characters) which the viewers have absolutely no emotional investment in. The latter can actually have the opposite effect if the violence is too comic over-the-top and the deaths too silly or ironic.

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One stand-out favorite scene for me is in the Hitchcock movie The Birds... when the lady is sitting on a bench with her back to the school playground and she's waiting for school to let out and she's been sitting there a while when a couple of birds flying near draw her attention and she follows their flight and turns to see them join what appears to be hundreds of other birds that have already gathered on the playground.

I think that's definitely the best scene in the movie, but the scene I always see in reference to the movie follows that one, and is when the children are running from the school and the "playground" birds are attacking them.

I've always thought that that single moment of awareness of the presence of all those birds...and the birds are calm... is much, much scarier than the later scene of the birds actually attacking.

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One stand-out favorite scene for me is in the Hitchcock movie The Birds... when the lady is sitting on a bench with her back to the school playground and she's waiting for school to let out and she's been sitting there a while when a couple of birds flying near draw her attention and she follows their flight and turns to see them join what appears to be hundreds of other birds that have already gathered on the playground.

I think that's definitely the best scene in the movie, but the scene I always see in reference to the movie follows that one, and is when the children are running from the school and the "playground" birds are attacking them.

I've always thought that that single moment of awareness of the presence of all those birds...and the birds are calm... is much, much scarier than the later scene of the birds actually attacking.

Hitchcock was not just a master of horror, he was a master of suspence... and that feeling of pending horror is much more horrible than the actual fact sometimes ...

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LOVE HORROR MOVIES...they dont make em like they used too though.

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LOVE HORROR MOVIES...they dont make em like they used too though.

No, they sure dont. Cinema horror has been on a downward slide since the 90s. Paltry best describes them.

john carpenter, charles band, dario argento, mario bava and lamberto bava (maybe a few more directors I don't remember right now), usually I like to watch their films and my movie taste can be some different.

These men really knew their craft. John Carpenter doesnt make movies much these days because of his sentiments about the business has changed. And the fact he has made a string of really bad ones through the 90s and 00s.

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These men really knew their craft. John Carpenter doesnt make movies much these days because of his sentiments about the business has changed. And the fact he has made a string of really bad ones through the 90s and 00s.

John Carpenter is the most famous name among them, unfortunately, after in the mouth of madness j.carpenter could not make a good movie. Recently I watched his last movie named The Ward. The Ward was not a good and creative movie, in fact today I miss 80s 90s and movies of those decades or years and usually I don't like movies of 2000s. I say the same thing for music (tho I find electronic music of today is successful but as a whole the music of 2000s is not good in comparison with before years). Thanks for your interest and liking.

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