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Still Waters

German WWII parachute stolen to make knickers

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The story of how a band of women confronted a downed German airman with pitchforks to steal his silk parachute to make knickers from has emerged after 71 years.

The women saw the Luftwaffe bomber crash two miles from their village before they decided to go on a raid of their own.

Grabbing pitchforks, brooms and textile scissors, they marched across the countryside towards the wreckage to find wounded wireless operator Rudolph Budde lying in a ditch.

http://www.telegraph...kerbockers.html

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You too did that?! :lol:

My grandma would tell me WWII stories so I can confirm, parachutes were very prized over here, not only fine underwear but also nice blouses were made of them too.

They’d make new soles for old shoes from tyres, blouses from parachutes, used helmets to feed and water chicken and other farm animals... recycling at its best :D

(Believe it or not, I’ve encountered three still recognizable farm helmets in my life. German quality. One was Italian, though. I also found old Italian boots in the attic and donated them to local carnival enthusiasts :lol: )

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Got to make use of what is at hand.

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Got to make use of what is at hand.

True. I'd say that poverty can be very environment-friendly.

My grandma’s generation would use, reuse, nothing was ever deemed useless and simply thrown away - like my generation does. We are, in fact, spoiled.

On the other hand, they had no cheap plastic, stuff was made of durable materials, meant to last. Which reminds me I once managed to bend a hammer. Guess where it was made.

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I doubt it matters much, but the photo in the article is of a Feldwebel, not a Gefreiter!

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I doubt it matters much, but the photo in the article is of a Feldwebel, not a Gefreiter!

Because the photo was taken before he was demoted for surrendering his parachute.

(Yes, I just made that up.)

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You too did that?! :lol:

My grandma would tell me WWII stories so I can confirm, parachutes were very prized over here, not only fine underwear but also nice blouses were made of them too.

They’d make new soles for old shoes from tyres, blouses from parachutes, used helmets to feed and water chicken and other farm animals... recycling at its best :D

(Believe it or not, I’ve encountered three still recognizable farm helmets in my life. German quality. One was Italian, though. I also found old Italian boots in the attic and donated them to local carnival enthusiasts :lol: )

,WW2 .So many stories from all parts of Europe ,that have all but been lost .

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My mother was a member of the Belgian Resistance during World War II. Her group was primarily concerned with gathering intelligence for the allies, and smuggling downed allied fliers along a route that led back to England.

I still have the blouse she made from an allied nylon parachute. She often wore it on the street, under the Germans' noses, without them ever realizing what it was.

She was small, about 5 feet tall, and it's a small blouse.

Mom died in 1983 after battling cancer for nine years.

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And while I'm picking holes in that article - the He111 had a crew of 5, not 4 as stated! Shoddy journalism!!!!

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