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Crazyman420

America Unearthed

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I just got done watching the show "America Unearthed" on H2 and was pretty disappointed. The show was about a stone with runic inscriptions in Arizona. They deciphered it and traced a name back to England. The whole show seemed ver speculative. I couldn't find and more info on the stone or the story behind it. Any one else wondering?

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the grave marker? I got the impression at the end that they were going to apply for permits to dig there based on the ground radar hits.

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Chances are this is just one of those other cobbled together shows with very little research and a truck load of assumptions.

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There's another thread about this television program. It's probably on page 2 or 3 of the list of topics for this forum.

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There's another thread about this television program. It's probably on page 2 or 3 of the list of topics for this forum.

Yes, but that thread (the one you started) is about a Mayan connection with Georgia:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=239962

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No, it's about the show in general. I merely pointed out the Mayan thing as an example of what the show is about. But everyone ignored that.

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No, it's about the show in general. I merely pointed out the Mayan thing as an example of what the show is about. But everyone ignored that.

Yeah, I think I'm to blame for that...

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The person doing all this investigation got his start when he examined the Kensington Rune Stone and found it to be authentic. I had to laugh because the Kensington Rune Stone was found to be a fake based on the linguistics used.

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The person doing all this investigation got his start when he examined the Kensington Rune Stone and found it to be authentic. I had to laugh because the Kensington Rune Stone was found to be a fake based on the linguistics used.

Yeah I see where you're coming from. Considering that almost all Runologists and experts in Scandinavian linguistics consider the runestone to be a hoax.

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I got the impression at the end that they were going to apply for permits to dig there based on the ground radar hits.a15.jpg

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I was impressed with the Demonstration of Dowsing however. Rekindled my interest in that area.

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I caught the last 15 minutes of an episode last night about the "Anubis Cave" in western Oklahoma. The cave takes it's name from a crude carving of a dog-ish figure. Other figures noted were a crude man holding something that could possibly construed as a knife or sword and a bull figure, with a sunset depicted between them. The latter was connected to the fact that the sun shines on that spot of the cave wall when it sets at the autumnal equinox (and probably also for a few weeks around that date).

So naturally the host of the show interpreted the cave as evidence for a migration of Celts who practiced Mithraism and also worshipped Anubis. I giggled.

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I caught the last 15 minutes of an episode last night about the "Anubis Cave" in western Oklahoma. The cave takes it's name from a crude carving of a dog-ish figure. Other figures noted were a crude man holding something that could possibly construed as a knife or sword and a bull figure, with a sunset depicted between them. The latter was connected to the fact that the sun shines on that spot of the cave wall when it sets at the autumnal equinox (and probably also for a few weeks around that date).

So naturally the host of the show interpreted the cave as evidence for a migration of Celts who practiced Mithraism and also worshipped Anubis. I giggled.

They actually said "evidence for a migration of Celts who practiced Mithraism and also worshipped Anubis." Bit of a stretch isn't it?

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I got the impression at the end that they were going to apply for permits to dig there based on the ground radar hits.a16.jpgk3.jpg

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hmm... kinda sounds to me like on the autumn equinox the buffalo had them trapped in the cave and they were really really bored sitting there waiting for the buffalo to move so they doodled lol.... why does science always assume these people sat around a campfire and planned out every line drawn on a cave wall?? they never say " well i think they went in here to take a nice private dump and doodled on the wall."... have you ever been in a public bathroom stall or a portajohn?? this is human nature!

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didn't see the "rune" episode but I did see two others. I love the show.

one I did see was where he showed strong evidences that the Maya (or some of them) made it up into Florida and Georgia and are considered

an Indian tribe now.

Another was how he showed that copper mines in Michigan were mined for a thousand years or more during the bronze age

and the bronze artifacts in europe today show that the copper in it is the Michigan variety.

A scientist claimed that som much copper was taken out, that it would have taken 10,000 men 1,000 years to do it.

Obviously this was long before Columbus.

Edited by Earl.Of.Trumps

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They actually said "evidence for a migration of Celts who practiced Mithraism and also worshipped Anubis." Bit of a stretch isn't it?

Aye, quite the stretch. I also liked that they tried to portray it as a migration to take part in the American tradition of freedom from religious persecution following the Christianization of Rome. Obviously Oklahoma was the only place where they could avoid the might of the Roman Empire.

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didn't see the "rune" episode but I did see two others. I love the show.

one I did see was where he showed strong evidences that the Maya (or some of them) made it up into Florida and Georgia and are considered

an Indian tribe now.

Another was how he showed that copper mines in Michigan were mined for a thousand years or more during the bronze age

and the bronze artifacts in europe today show that the copper in it is the Michigan variety.

A scientist claimed that som much copper was taken out, that it would have taken 10,000 men 1,000 years to do it.

Obviously this was long before Columbus.

Which is a patent fallacy. The utilization and trade of raw copper extracted from Isle Royale, the Keweenaw Peninsula of upper Michigan and associated areas, or collected from the glacial till of the Lake Superior region, is well documented (Drier 1961, Steinberg 1975, Wayman 1985, Rapp, et. al. 2000). The greatest use of this copper was during the Archaic period and is primarily associated with the mid to late Archaic (circa 5000-3000 BP). This came to be known as the Old Copper Culture (Pulford 2000). This terminology has since been revised, with the term Old Copper Complex being more currently applied. Earlier dates related to the Amerindian utilization of the indigenous copper are reported. Beukens (1992) reports a date of approximately 7000 BP from a site in northeastern Minnesota.

The utilization of these resources continued, though to a lesser degree and with somewhat different application, into the Woodland/Mississippian periods.

The trace element analysis of these resources has been notably well defined by Rapp, et. al., 1980.

The "volumetric" aspect has also been quite thoroughly addressed. The crux of this aspect concerns the early (ca +/- earlier 20th century) recovery bias combined with amateur understandings of the nature of the resource formation. This aspect was further compounded by misinterpretation of early EuroAmerican excavations.

In short, this proposition has never been seriously considered and the credible archaeological research has long ago demonstrated that such fringe "propositions" have no supportable basis.

.

.

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Must admit I enjoy this show but as all these kind of shows tend to do ........... it leaves more questions than answers to the lay man.Everyone likes a mystery and we all have a different degree of belief.If I had to believe everything the presenter tells us then Columbus was one of the last visitors to America!

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A biology professor from Harvard published a book in 1982 called "Bronze Age America" in which he claims an Old Norse king visited Ontario, Canada around 1700 B.C. Since 30 years have passed I'm sure the orthodox legions have since chewed him to shreds but some interesting items in the book. First there is a site northeast of Peterborough, ON where a large stone surface was discovered in the mid-1950s which displayed a great number of ancient symbols as well as a series of dots and lines which appear to be text. The various pictographs look to be Old Norse gods, particularly one of Tsiw, whose hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir and another of Loki, the trickster. It's difficult to pass these off as coincidences as they did the images of a Norse sun god. The Canadian government still lists the site as aboriginal in nature but took the time to build a building over it to protect it from the elements. There's no doubt to its authenticity as the discovery was quickly followed by excavation of an overgrowth layer and subsequent photographic documentation. The author also claims that the writing on the stone is a form of ogam consaine, and also relates it to Berber Tifinag. I'll leave it to the others on this site (linguists and geneticists) to examine the validity of his arguments (he suggests the Berbers were remnants of the defeated "Sea People" who fought against the ancient Egyptians!).

What's remarkable is we have a well-preserved carved-in-stone record dating to perhaps 3700 years ago. You can go visit it and although you can't stick your fingers in the holes, you can observe it first hand. The other remarkable thing about the site (now called Peterborough Petroglyph Park) is that its on an aboriginal trail that allows for a fairly easy water route from Lake Huron to Lake Ontario. If you take into account that Lake Huron was likely at a higher water level and the overall country was still rebounding from the weight of the ice age glaciers, the trail would ahve been a little easier than it is today. Lake Simcoe, near the western end of the trail is about 180 feet higher in elevation than Huron, and after that its almost entirely downhill to Trenton, Ontario on the eastern end. Of course, the author claims that the 1700 BC visit was to obtain coper ingots. I do not know if any such ingots have been discovered along the trail but that would be an obvious confirmation of its use.

Swede, the author also claims that by breaking the linguistic "code" he was able to interpret a number of stone carvings in Sweden. Place names are Fossum, Bohuslan and Backa, Brasted and Finnstorp, Bohuslan and others as well so you may have a personal interest in checking that out.

I'm hoping to take a drive up there (Peterborough) this summer as its not too far from my home. It can't be a hoax, but it may be argued that the site is later than 1700 BC so it can be attributed to the later arrival of the Vikings. Still, if the linguists can affirm his decoding of old Norse writing and language that would be huge.

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Another was how he showed that copper mines in Michigan were mined for a thousand years or more during the bronze age

and the bronze artifacts in europe today show that the copper in it is the Michigan variety.

In fact, that is simply not the case. Don't swallow everything the fringe tells you. No Michigan copper from the Bronze age has ever been found in Europe or anywhere else in the Eastern Hemisphere.

A scientist claimed that so much copper was taken out, that it would have taken 10,000 men 1,000 years to do it.

Obviously this was long before Columbus.

No scientist made that claim, since it's absurdly impossible to calculate how much copper came out of hundreds of empty holes. If you look into the Old Michigan Copper Culture, on the other hand, you'll find that they did dwell in the area for longer than that.

Harte

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A biology professor from Harvard published a book in 1982 called "Bronze Age America" in which he claims an Old Norse king visited Ontario, Canada around 1700 B.C. Since 30 years have passed I'm sure the orthodox legions have since chewed him to shreds but some interesting items in the book. First there is a site northeast of Peterborough, ON where a large stone surface was discovered in the mid-1950s which displayed a great number of ancient symbols as well as a series of dots and lines which appear to be text. The various pictographs look to be Old Norse gods, particularly one of Tsiw, whose hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir and another of Loki, the trickster. It's difficult to pass these off as coincidences as they did the images of a Norse sun god. The Canadian government still lists the site as aboriginal in nature but took the time to build a building over it to protect it from the elements. There's no doubt to its authenticity as the discovery was quickly followed by excavation of an overgrowth layer and subsequent photographic documentation. The author also claims that the writing on the stone is a form of ogam consaine, and also relates it to Berber Tifinag. I'll leave it to the others on this site (linguists and geneticists) to examine the validity of his arguments (he suggests the Berbers were remnants of the defeated "Sea People" who fought against the ancient Egyptians!).

What's remarkable is we have a well-preserved carved-in-stone record dating to perhaps 3700 years ago. You can go visit it and although you can't stick your fingers in the holes, you can observe it first hand. The other remarkable thing about the site (now called Peterborough Petroglyph Park) is that its on an aboriginal trail that allows for a fairly easy water route from Lake Huron to Lake Ontario. If you take into account that Lake Huron was likely at a higher water level and the overall country was still rebounding from the weight of the ice age glaciers, the trail would ahve been a little easier than it is today. Lake Simcoe, near the western end of the trail is about 180 feet higher in elevation than Huron, and after that its almost entirely downhill to Trenton, Ontario on the eastern end. Of course, the author claims that the 1700 BC visit was to obtain coper ingots. I do not know if any such ingots have been discovered along the trail but that would be an obvious confirmation of its use.

Swede, the author also claims that by breaking the linguistic "code" he was able to interpret a number of stone carvings in Sweden. Place names are Fossum, Bohuslan and Backa, Brasted and Finnstorp, Bohuslan and others as well so you may have a personal interest in checking that out.

I'm hoping to take a drive up there (Peterborough) this summer as its not too far from my home. It can't be a hoax, but it may be argued that the site is later than 1700 BC so it can be attributed to the later arrival of the Vikings. Still, if the linguists can affirm his decoding of old Norse writing and language that would be huge.

Lakeview, is the book written by Barry Fell by any chance? Because if it is, please do read through this article. Might be a bit of an eye-opener, it boils down to one thing, Fell is trying to sell us runic inscriptions, two thousand years older than any known runic inscription found in Europe. That is in my eyes a bit of a problem.

Edited by TheSearcher

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Lakeview, is the book written by Barry Fell by any chance? Because if it is, please do read through this article. Might be a bit of an eye-opener, it boils down to one thing, Fell is trying to sell us ‘Bronze Age’ Scandinavian texts, two thousand years older than any known runic inscriptions in Europe.

Now, now. You have hurt Fell's little feelings, and he surely can attest to having been there when those texts were written! :devil:

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Now, now. You have hurt Fell's little feelings, and he surely can attest to having been there when those texts were written! :devil:

Be nice now Questionmark....

......besides Fell identifies scratches on rock, he doesn't make them ...... I think..... :innocent:

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.

Swede, the author also claims that by breaking the linguistic "code" he was able to interpret a number of stone carvings in Sweden.

As alluded to by both Questionmark and Searcher, your referenced source is one Barry Fell. The credibility of said individual in regards to the relevant topic has long ago been thoroughly discounted. Can go into more detail, but the following are provided as a brief overview. First, in regards to Fell:

http://ydli.org/dakinfo/celticp.htm

http://www.ramtops.co.uk/loslunas.html

http://cwva.org/cont...gham_intro.html

http://cwva.org/ogam...utal/wirtz.html

And one more in regards to the Old Copper Complex. This one is actually a bit dated, but should provide perspective.

http://www.ramtops.co.uk/copper.html

.

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