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Saru

Space station UFO sightings on the rise

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I must admit i only watched this with one eye, the other one is watching football (not the american kind, but real football! :yes::D )

you mean you were watching soccer, silentsinger. football in the united states is real football.

We Americans played soccer in grade school. Usually when you grow up you start playing real sports.

Exactly.

yawn. :passifier:

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We Americans played soccer in grade school. Usually when you grow up you start playing real sports.

Exactly.

You mean when people grow up, they sit on their couch watching the pros play?

Back to the topic. I don't know why NASA have such poor quality footage? You would think they can get better camera, is that the best money could buy?

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What are the criteria that people use to determine that these phenomena are 'otherworldly'? Movement? Speed? How is regular 'dandruff' eliminated using said criteria? I'd really like to know because I have yet to see any criteria put forth that can account for the variables of normal debris/ice particles and how they could behave in space.

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Back to the topic. I don't know why NASA have such poor quality footage? You would think they can get better camera, is that the best money could buy?

lol c'mon. you're watching digital zoom on distant objects on a re-compressed youtube user video of the original compressed nasa public release videos taken from cameras that may have had who knows what purpose other than zooming in on distant space junk...

you can't just look at this end result and say: nasa, you suck. You can't even tell what the original footage looked like.

I think it's highly unlikely their main cameras are logitech webcams, and that they're total idiots.

Edited by ad hoc
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Space debris is in orbit, and that's pretty fast. We're talking thousands of miles per hour. Particles of dust can strike a satellite with so much force that the impact creates a plasma burn. There is so much junk, old satellites and current satellites that we almost have a visible ring around the planet. NASA has to wait for a 'window' in all this junk just to get a launch. This was an image created on BBC's Stargazing Live. Its crowded up there, so I guarantee all these 'UFOs' that people keep spotting from NASA TV etc are just junk.

p013kx13.jpg?nodefault=true

A man made asteroid belt.

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The typical stuff that causes such images is explained here:

www.jamesoberg.com/ufo.html

I've also got the operating manuals for the TV cameras used for most of the shuttle videos, same link.

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lol c'mon. you're watching digital zoom on distant objects on a re-compressed youtube user video of the original compressed nasa public release videos taken from cameras that may have had who knows what purpose other than zooming in on distant space junk...

you can't just look at this end result and say: nasa, you suck. You can't even tell what the original footage looked like.

I think it's highly unlikely their main cameras are logitech webcams, and that they're total idiots.

No I can't tell what the original footage looked like. But the all footage seemed pretty poor, that's all I can judge it by. So NASA kept all the good quality footage to themselves and release poor version to the public?

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Well the way it works is that the ISS is travelling at thousands of Km/h itself, and many of the objects will have similar orbits. So they will appear to be moving slowly in relation to the ISS.

Just like being on a busy highway.

No, random space junk will not be seen. It's when space junk falls off your own vehicle in orbit that you can get video of it. That is when you get a similar orbit and relative motions come into play. That doesn't happen with random space junk. Your welcome for that bit of education.

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No, random space junk will not be seen. It's when space junk falls off your own vehicle in orbit that you can get video of it. That is when you get a similar orbit and relative motions come into play. That doesn't happen with random space junk. Your welcome for that bit of education.

Well, I can't find any info that indicates that there isn't any space junk orbiting near enough to the ISS to be seen, so if you can link that would be good.

Point being that most of the debris comes from activity in LEO, destruction of satellites etc sending stuff in every direction, much of which (unless I'm mistaken) ends up in higher orbits than the original orbit of the satellite. So you'd expect some of that debris to by chance end up somewhat relative to the ISS.

Now, considering that on a clear night I can see a satellite that is 300km away because it's gleaming so brightly in the sun, don't you think a largish chunk of space debris might be visible from a few tens of kilometers away- especially if it has an orbit somewhat relative to the ISS?

On another note, seems that deteriorating orbits send them towards earth quite regularly.

Edited by ad hoc

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DKO do not tarnish Australia with AFL, disgraceful bunch of skirts just jersey slingin eachother, NRL IS THE ONLY WAY!!

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There's so many satellites and space debris up there it could be anything including a UFO.

Indeed. As we've seen in a few shows and movies ships will specifically hide in debris to escape detection. ;)

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Broad statement, pretty sure the more massive pieces are visible.

You could see other actual satellites but not the "billions of bits of junk" you are talking about.

Edited by lost_shaman

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You would if they caught the sunlight for a brief period.

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You would if they caught the sunlight for a brief period.

When the orbits take then through the day side they do get sunlight but you still can't see them because of several reasons. They are too small and distant, their relative speeds are too great, the ambient light conditions are not condusive to visual sightings of these small very fast and distant orbital debris. Bullets and much larger projectiles from cannons also catch and reflect sulight but you can not see them and these are objects that are relatively large and relatively slow, many times slower than orbital debris, and they are completely invisible to the human eye during their trajectories.

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when will somone actually get footage of a ufo close-up.

Every photo/vid on ufo's are always the same.. Out of focus or so far away we dont see anything.

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when will somone actually get footage of a ufo close-up.

Every photo/vid on ufo's are always the same.. Out of focus or so far away we dont see anything.

Reminds me of Bigfoot. ^_^

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No I can't tell what the original footage looked like. But the all footage seemed pretty poor, that's all I can judge it by. So NASA kept all the good quality footage to themselves and release poor version to the public?

So -- you want to believe that because the available evidence is poor, this suggests that better evidence is hidden?

How about a simpler explanation -- there IS no 'better' video and imagery.

What's the evidence for the former hypothesis?

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Must distinguish space-junk from UFOs in order to clarify.

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