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SubjectDigamma

Congo and New Guinea the monsters den

12 posts in this topic

I've had to do a report bout the Congo and it and New Guinea are the stuff of nightmares

Look at all the possabiltys

New Guinea

Artrellia: Allegedly a 20 foot long tree-dwelling lizard found in Papua New Guinea. Probably some form of monitor possaby the great ripper.

Gazeka: A large tapir-like animal reported to live in the Owen Stanley mountains of Papua New Guinea. Name means "pig devil". Despite the superficial similarity, there are allegedly several key differences between the Gazeka and tapirs: The Gazeka is said to possess a horse-like tail, claws on it's feet, and the ability to rear up on it's hind legs. May be a relict population of the marsupial Palorchestes.

Giant amphibious monitor: An alleged giant monitor species from eastern New Guinea that is said to be semiaquatic.

Large furry lizards: Large lizards - or lizard-like animals – that have been seen near the Aikora River which were covered in a coat of fur. These could be mammals which look reptilian in basic body shape, thus giving the impression of being "lizards", or reptiles that evolved a hair-like integument independently from mammal fur.

Murray: A large dinosaur-like animal reported from around Lake Murray in Papua New Guinea. Reportedly "as long as a dump truck," and as wide as nearly two meters (7 feet). It sports a long neck and a long slender tail, and walks on two hind legs "as thick as coconut palm tree trunks", with two smaller forlegs in front. The head is similar in shape to a cow's head, with large eyes and "sharp teeth as long as fingers." The skin was likened to that of a crocodile, and the creature had "largish triangular scoops on the back." Often identified with Iguanodon, but more likely related to abelisaurid theropods.

New Guinea freshwater shark: A shark which has been seen in the waters of Sentani Lake, New Guinea. This could be a new species, or just a land-locked population of bullsharks like the only known freshwater shark, the Lake Nicaragua shark, turned out to be.

New Guinea giant bird: A large eagle-like bird that was reported by early settlers to the island. It was said to inhabit a certain, hard to reach area of swampland near an inlet. The native Papuans say it can carry off a dugong or sea turtle with ease.

New Guinea Orangutan: Karl Shuker mentioned in his column in Fortean Times a tribal figurine that looked much like an orangutan.

Papuan giant spider: An alleged dog-sized spider from Papua New Guinea. The area where the spider was seen was coated with a sheet of web, like those made by funnel-web spiders. many species of large (eight inches) funnel-web spiders live in Eastern Australia.

Papuan Rhinoceros: Locals have long spoken of "a wild pig that is much bigger than a pig and that has a horn on it's nose" that lives in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. This, and the fact that rhino-like dung heaps, rhino-like grunts, and rhino-like animals have all been seen and heard lends heavy credence to the idea that PNG might harbour a rhino species.

Parker's snake: A 6 foot long venomous snake that allegedly killed 3 children in Papua New Guinea. The natives say it is a rare, aquatic snake with smooth scales, large ventral scales, and a short tail. It is said to prefer small freshwater swamps and inland streams, sometimes being found in marshland or rivers.

PNG Dog-like animal: An animal matching the description of the Thylacine (A supposedly extinct Tasmanian marsupial). Probably a Papuan population of Thylacine.

Ropen: Also known as Duwas, Indava, or Seklo-bali. A bioluminescent pterosaur-like animal reported from Papua New Guinea and neighboring islands. Said to roost in mountainous caves during the day, and emerge at night to fish.

Undescribed Dendrelaphis species: An undescribed snake of the Dendrelaphis genus seen in Papua New Guinea.

I work slow so if I don't reply

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And Congo its all got the saposed Dinosaurs not even gonna let

But the Kali river worth looking into

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Ok thay got nothing but man-eating catfish

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Hi SubjectDigamma,

Sorry for my dark humour, but Congo does have a mythical monster, ever heard of the "Leo-Pold Blanco Homo Erectus" that killed millions? A very dangerous animal!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3516965.stm

No wish at all to pull thread off topic, just my dark humour at play ha ha!

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I've had to do a report bout the Congo and it and New Guinea are the stuff of nightmares

Look at all the possabiltys

New Guinea

Artrellia: Allegedly a 20 foot long tree-dwelling lizard found in Papua New Guinea. Probably some form of monitor possaby the great ripper.

Gazeka: A large tapir-like animal reported to live in the Owen Stanley mountains of Papua New Guinea. Name means "pig devil". Despite the superficial similarity, there are allegedly several key differences between the Gazeka and tapirs: The Gazeka is said to possess a horse-like tail, claws on it's feet, and the ability to rear up on it's hind legs. May be a relict population of the marsupial Palorchestes.

Giant amphibious monitor: An alleged giant monitor species from eastern New Guinea that is said to be semiaquatic.

Large furry lizards: Large lizards - or lizard-like animals that have been seen near the Aikora River which were covered in a coat of fur. These could be mammals which look reptilian in basic body shape, thus giving the impression of being "lizards", or reptiles that evolved a hair-like integument independently from mammal fur.

Murray: A large dinosaur-like animal reported from around Lake Murray in Papua New Guinea. Reportedly "as long as a dump truck," and as wide as nearly two meters (7 feet). It sports a long neck and a long slender tail, and walks on two hind legs "as thick as coconut palm tree trunks", with two smaller forlegs in front. The head is similar in shape to a cow's head, with large eyes and "sharp teeth as long as fingers." The skin was likened to that of a crocodile, and the creature had "largish triangular scoops on the back." Often identified with Iguanodon, but more likely related to abelisaurid theropods.

New Guinea freshwater shark: A shark which has been seen in the waters of Sentani Lake, New Guinea. This could be a new species, or just a land-locked population of bullsharks like the only known freshwater shark, the Lake Nicaragua shark, turned out to be.

New Guinea giant bird: A large eagle-like bird that was reported by early settlers to the island. It was said to inhabit a certain, hard to reach area of swampland near an inlet. The native Papuans say it can carry off a dugong or sea turtle with ease.

New Guinea Orangutan: Karl Shuker mentioned in his column in Fortean Times a tribal figurine that looked much like an orangutan.

Papuan giant spider: An alleged dog-sized spider from Papua New Guinea. The area where the spider was seen was coated with a sheet of web, like those made by funnel-web spiders. many species of large (eight inches) funnel-web spiders live in Eastern Australia.

Papuan Rhinoceros: Locals have long spoken of "a wild pig that is much bigger than a pig and that has a horn on it's nose" that lives in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. This, and the fact that rhino-like dung heaps, rhino-like grunts, and rhino-like animals have all been seen and heard lends heavy credence to the idea that PNG might harbour a rhino species.

Parker's snake: A 6 foot long venomous snake that allegedly killed 3 children in Papua New Guinea. The natives say it is a rare, aquatic snake with smooth scales, large ventral scales, and a short tail. It is said to prefer small freshwater swamps and inland streams, sometimes being found in marshland or rivers.

PNG Dog-like animal: An animal matching the description of the Thylacine (A supposedly extinct Tasmanian marsupial). Probably a Papuan population of Thylacine.

Ropen: Also known as Duwas, Indava, or Seklo-bali. A bioluminescent pterosaur-like animal reported from Papua New Guinea and neighboring islands. Said to roost in mountainous caves during the day, and emerge at night to fish.

Undescribed Dendrelaphis species: An undescribed snake of the Dendrelaphis genus seen in Papua New Guinea.

I work slow so if I don't reply

Excellent work! The Murray is the Congo equivalent mokele-mbembe of course with some added details imo. The Gazeka is most likely the male counterpart to the female Murray. Note the standing on hind-legs. This is a werewolf/dogman-like cryptid imo. Here's the UK version:

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I've had to do a report bout the Congo and it and New Guinea are the stuff of nightmares

Look at all the possabiltys

New Guinea

Artrellia: Allegedly a 20 foot long tree-dwelling lizard found in Papua New Guinea. Probably some form of monitor possaby the great ripper.

Gazeka: A large tapir-like animal reported to live in the Owen Stanley mountains of Papua New Guinea. Name means "pig devil". Despite the superficial similarity, there are allegedly several key differences between the Gazeka and tapirs: The Gazeka is said to possess a horse-like tail, claws on it's feet, and the ability to rear up on it's hind legs. May be a relict population of the marsupial Palorchestes.

Giant amphibious monitor: An alleged giant monitor species from eastern New Guinea that is said to be semiaquatic.

Large furry lizards: Large lizards - or lizard-like animals – that have been seen near the Aikora River which were covered in a coat of fur. These could be mammals which look reptilian in basic body shape, thus giving the impression of being "lizards", or reptiles that evolved a hair-like integument independently from mammal fur..............

I work slow so if I don't reply

All these crazy animals, so diverse and yet all with one key similarity - Not a lick of evidence for any of them, AT ALL. So either the good people of the Congo and New Guinea are really atrociously horrible at collecting evidence or all of these creatures are misidentifications of known animals, fairy-tales, or hoaxes told to tourists for the entertainment of the locals.

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I could see one or two max turning out to exist or have existed but it would be highly unlikely they all were. The Murray seems the least likely to me and the large snakes the most or maybe the rhino like creature. That's not the first I've heard about that one. There are still 1000s of unknown species in the world but a tiny portion of them are big. Stuff over a certain size just doesn't go unnoticed forever. Thanks for the list by the way. Great read!

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I've had to do a report bout the Congo and it and New Guinea are the stuff of nightmares

Look at all the possabiltys

New Guinea

Artrellia: Allegedly a 20 foot long tree-dwelling lizard found in Papua New Guinea. Probably some form of monitor possaby the great ripper.

Gazeka: A large tapir-like animal reported to live in the Owen Stanley mountains of Papua New Guinea. Name means "pig devil". Despite the superficial similarity, there are allegedly several key differences between the Gazeka and tapirs: The Gazeka is said to possess a horse-like tail, claws on it's feet, and the ability to rear up on it's hind legs. May be a relict population of the marsupial Palorchestes.

Giant amphibious monitor: An alleged giant monitor species from eastern New Guinea that is said to be semiaquatic.

Large furry lizards: Large lizards - or lizard-like animals – that have been seen near the Aikora River which were covered in a coat of fur. These could be mammals which look reptilian in basic body shape, thus giving the impression of being "lizards", or reptiles that evolved a hair-like integument independently from mammal fur.

Murray: A large dinosaur-like animal reported from around Lake Murray in Papua New Guinea. Reportedly "as long as a dump truck," and as wide as nearly two meters (7 feet). It sports a long neck and a long slender tail, and walks on two hind legs "as thick as coconut palm tree trunks", with two smaller forlegs in front. The head is similar in shape to a cow's head, with large eyes and "sharp teeth as long as fingers." The skin was likened to that of a crocodile, and the creature had "largish triangular scoops on the back." Often identified with Iguanodon, but more likely related to abelisaurid theropods.

New Guinea freshwater shark: A shark which has been seen in the waters of Sentani Lake, New Guinea. This could be a new species, or just a land-locked population of bullsharks like the only known freshwater shark, the Lake Nicaragua shark, turned out to be.

New Guinea giant bird: A large eagle-like bird that was reported by early settlers to the island. It was said to inhabit a certain, hard to reach area of swampland near an inlet. The native Papuans say it can carry off a dugong or sea turtle with ease.

New Guinea Orangutan: Karl Shuker mentioned in his column in Fortean Times a tribal figurine that looked much like an orangutan.

Papuan giant spider: An alleged dog-sized spider from Papua New Guinea. The area where the spider was seen was coated with a sheet of web, like those made by funnel-web spiders. many species of large (eight inches) funnel-web spiders live in Eastern Australia.

Papuan Rhinoceros: Locals have long spoken of "a wild pig that is much bigger than a pig and that has a horn on it's nose" that lives in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. This, and the fact that rhino-like dung heaps, rhino-like grunts, and rhino-like animals have all been seen and heard lends heavy credence to the idea that PNG might harbour a rhino species.

Parker's snake: A 6 foot long venomous snake that allegedly killed 3 children in Papua New Guinea. The natives say it is a rare, aquatic snake with smooth scales, large ventral scales, and a short tail. It is said to prefer small freshwater swamps and inland streams, sometimes being found in marshland or rivers.

PNG Dog-like animal: An animal matching the description of the Thylacine (A supposedly extinct Tasmanian marsupial). Probably a Papuan population of Thylacine.

Ropen: Also known as Duwas, Indava, or Seklo-bali. A bioluminescent pterosaur-like animal reported from Papua New Guinea and neighboring islands. Said to roost in mountainous caves during the day, and emerge at night to fish.

Undescribed Dendrelaphis species: An undescribed snake of the Dendrelaphis genus seen in Papua New Guinea.

There have been individual threads on many of these...

1) Artrellia - Supposedly a ton plus arborial lizard. That lives on the coast. I call this one possible, but very, very unlikely.

2) Gazeka - Haven't heard of this one before. Will look it up for my collection of useless knowledge.

3) Giant Aquatic Monitor - Maybe, but probably not giant. Maybe 4 to 6 feet long.

4) Hairy Lizard - I'm just going to go with No on this one.

5) Murray - I'm going to say either misidentification, or just No. Giant critters are hard to hide even in a seldom traveled jungle.

6) Freshwater Shark - Good chance. They (bull sharks) do already exist after all.

7) Giant Bird - I'm just going to go with No again here. Sea turtles and dugongs are ton heavy critters and a bird to fly off with one would have to be two plus tons in weight, and thus would have to have a wingspan of 200 or 300 feet.

8) Giant Spider - I'm again going to say No. At least to a spider bigger then any conventionally known spiders.

9) Rhino - Good chance. They do (did?) exist in Indonesia.

10) Parker Snake - Sure why not. Just a poisonous snake. Australia is full of them.

11) Dog Monster - No as a Thylacine. Possibly something else. Dingo breed maybe.

12) Ropen - Not as reported certainly. Giant flying glowing reptiles? Maybe as some kind of large fruit bat or some such.

13) Dendrelaphis snake - WIki says the green tree snakealready exists in Papua New Guinea. So, I don't see why a sub-species could not live there too.

Edit: I think the Gazeka would have a chance at being a tapir species. It might be very similar to the Mountain Tapir of South America. Just as the Malaysian tapir is similar to the Brazilian tapir.

Edited by DieChecker

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Hi SubjectDigamma,

Sorry for my dark humour, but Congo does have a mythical monster, ever heard of the "Leo-Pold Blanco Homo Erectus" that killed millions? A very dangerous animal!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3516965.stm

No wish at all to pull thread off topic, just my dark humour at play ha ha!

Wow ok add a crazed old man to the Kali list of monsters

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All these crazy animals, so diverse and yet all with one key similarity - Not a lick of evidence for any of them, AT ALL. So either the good people of the Congo and New Guinea are really atrociously horrible at collecting evidence or all of these creatures are misidentifications of known animals, fairy-tales, or hoaxes told to tourists for the entertainment of the locals.

In all due respect but to dismiss them all as fairy tales and hoaxes is a bit silly IMO.

No one doubts that there are many undiscovered animals that exist and remain undiscovered in the world and in the sea.

only 1 per cent of the congo rain forrest has been explored by scientists. Same goes for amazon rain forrest and many other out of reach jungles.

Every year scientists discover new animals.

Admittedly most animals discovered are small animals, such as lizards, frogs, insects, small birds and small mammals.

But I think some of those animals are likely to exist. Some are likely to be hoaxes.

personally I think the rhino is real and some of the lizards and snakes. But the size estimates are way smaller. the dinosaurs however are IMO hoaxes

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In all due respect but to dismiss them all as fairy tales and hoaxes is a bit silly IMO.

No one doubts that there are many undiscovered animals that exist and remain undiscovered in the world and in the sea.

only 1 per cent of the congo rain forrest has been explored by scientists. Same goes for amazon rain forrest and many other out of reach jungles.

Every year scientists discover new animals.

Admittedly most animals discovered are small animals, such as lizards, frogs, insects, small birds and small mammals.

But I think some of those animals are likely to exist. Some are likely to be hoaxes.

personally I think the rhino is real and some of the lizards and snakes. But the size estimates are way smaller. the dinosaurs however are IMO hoaxes

I'm talking primarily about the examples of megafauna - such as the dinosaurs you mention. The likelihood of there being undiscovered megafauna living anywhere on the planet, honestly, is quite minimal. The biggest animals are the easy ones to find, because they make the most impact of their environments, and are quite simply BIG.

Do I think that there are undiscovered snakes, lizards, monkeys, insects, etc in the world's rainforests - sure. But they are going to be small ones. That doesn't make them any less significant either. Nature is wonderful and wondrous. It also has rules.

That is why I don't believe in cryptid megafauna species - they break all or most of nature's rules by supposedly existing, yet not leaving behind evidence like all other animals eventually do.

Edited by orangepeaceful79

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I'm talking primarily about the examples of megafauna - such as the dinosaurs you mention. The likelihood of there being undiscovered megafauna living anywhere on the planet, honestly, is quite minimal. The biggest animals are the easy ones to find, because they make the most impact of their environments, and are quite simply BIG.

Do I think that there are undiscovered snakes, lizards, monkeys, insects, etc in the world's rainforests - sure. But they are going to be small ones. That doesn't make them any less significant either. Nature is wonderful and wondrous. It also has rules.

That is why I don't believe in cryptid megafauna species - they break all or most of nature's rules by supposedly existing, yet not leaving behind evidence like all other animals eventually do.

I totally agree with you.

The megafuna are not likely to exist because a dinosaur or any other huge animal isn't likely to exist due to the fact it's big, and the fact that the food they'd have to eat amongst other things proves it;s not real.

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