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acidhead

Wal-Mart to Hire 100,000 Veterans

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Only the ones who retire or are medically seperated get pensions BM... Most of the vets they are talking about (I assume) are those who've spent one enlistment period (3 or 4 years) and then got out... And with the economy the way it is, few retiree's (civilian or military) can afford to turn their noses up at additional income...

I realize that many on the military were trained in skills that do not translate well to the civilian world (not a lot of call for an artilleryman on the 'outside' for example)... but quite a few of us did get useful skills (for me, electronics and computer systems)... For those that were not fortunate - or far sighted - enough to get "useful" training, this is not a bad deal... Though I would recommend they couple it with training at a vo-tech or college to be positioned to move into a more stable job...

3 or 4 Years? Thats not a veteran....(well it is, but not when you think Veteran - long serving) They choose to be in the army (most of them Id assume) therefore have to live with the fact they wasted there live getting non cilivan type training and work.

There are many people out there that are wanting just a job - and if a veteran gets choosing over them, jsut becasue of this - then I beleive it is unfair.

Edited by The Id3al Experience

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Only the ones who retire or are medically seperated get pensions BM... Most of the vets they are talking about (I assume) are those who've spent one enlistment period (3 or 4 years) and then got out... And with the economy the way it is, few retiree's (civilian or military) can afford to turn their noses up at additional income...

I realize that many on the military were trained in skills that do not translate well to the civilian world (not a lot of call for an artilleryman on the 'outside' for example)... but quite a few of us did get useful skills (for me, electronics and computer systems)... For those that were not fortunate - or far sighted - enough to get "useful" training, this is not a bad deal... Though I would recommend they couple it with training at a vo-tech or college to be positioned to move into a more stable job...

I want to ask you..( Just to see if you guys worked the same as us ) .. If you are in full time employment, would it be normal for your company to offer it's employees a pension scheme ? I have been saving up in my own pension for at least 10years now...If I get another job some place else, I have the option to carry forth my current pension and keep saving .. It comes out of your wage each month along with tax and your national insurance... So, by the time I am 65 ( and I am currently still in my 30's now ) I should have a good bit saved in my pension... A lot of us will do that over here Some of us will have more than one pension

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3 or 4 Years? Thats not a veteran....(well it is, but not when you think Veteran - long serving) They choose to be in the army (most of them Id assume) therefore have to live with the fact they wasted there live getting non cilivan type training and work.

There are many people out there that are wanting just a job - and if a veteran gets choosing over them, jsut becasue of this - then I beleive it is unfair.

I served from 1991 -2005 before they said your diabeies is way too bad for you to servemhere are you papers,I said a few choice words before I left with a broken heart,I dont see myself as a veteran,I see myself as an American.All I know how to do is shoot and follow orders,but as far as working at wallmart,It's better than sitting here rotting away doing nothing,Nobody want to hire someone who has advanced Diabeties.sometime I wish that gernade killed me,but heck no I had to walk away from it,Darn it.LOL
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GreatmYou know I had a good life when I was in the millitary,I was a Marine snipper and could hit all my targets,Funny thing is I was never really good at anything else,"VERY SAD" I wonder what kind of job they would give someone like me,Im an OLD rusted piece of steal No one wants to hire me due to my advanced Diabeties,I could be dead in the next year or two but that dosent put food on the table,I Need a JOB but I cant see myself working for Wallmart,They discrimminate against women and Blacks,I cant see my self working for that kind of company,still if they hired me I can asure you the sporting good department would be always fully stocked with fishing gear,LOL

I would think a sniper would be great at monitoring security cameras as I take it you would have to have a keen eye and anticipate what people will do and it seems it would be cool to use all the zoom features on the cameras. Hopefully, your diabetes hasn't affected your eyesight, I'm type 2, myself, and it's no walk in the park but I'm still trying to fight it...

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3 or 4 Years? Thats not a veteran....(well it is, but not when you think Veteran - long serving) They choose to be in the army (most of them Id assume) therefore have to live with the fact they wasted there live getting non cilivan type training and work.

There are many people out there that are wanting just a job - and if a veteran gets choosing over them, jsut becasue of this - then I beleive it is unfair.

A veteran is anyone who served in the military. A war veteran is anyone who served in the military in support of a war.

Because unemployment for veterans was 3% higher than the normal populace there have been tax incentives and what not passed to promote hiring of veterans over civillians. I am fairly certain that these tax advantages are the real reason for Walmart's generosity in hiring veterans over civillians.

Fair- Probably not.

America- Land of the Free (Highest % of population incarcerated in the world)

and home of the brave (40% of homeless men are veterans)

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I want to ask you..( Just to see if you guys worked the same as us ) .. If you are in full time employment, would it be normal for your company to offer it's employees a pension scheme ? I have been saving up in my own pension for at least 10years now...If I get another job some place else, I have the option to carry forth my current pension and keep saving .. It comes out of your wage each month along with tax and your national insurance... So, by the time I am 65 ( and I am currently still in my 30's now ) I should have a good bit saved in my pension... A lot of us will do that over here Some of us will have more than one pension

Power to you B.M. I had a personal pension scheme (portable) for 20 years, and after that time I was seeing only 1.5 to 2.0 % annual increment in the value. I immediately withdrew the funds (no small amount by then) and have seen 7 to 8 % annual increments since then. I am no NOT an Independent Financial Advisor, so will not tell you how I achieved that return, but it was legal and simple. At 7% annually, then every 10 years your fund doubles in size - this means a huge difference at maturity.

I dont take risks with my pension, but neither do I get suckered into the schemes offered by most Financial Institutions. i took an early withdrawal 2 years ago of 200,000 euros and have bought a property for my retirement already - it is currently let out through an agent, fully insured and bonded, and have 1000 euros net, a month going back into my funds.

From talking to my USA Friends this is not so different to what they do - if they are self - employed. If you are employed by another company (rather than as a contractor) then they seem to get the worst additional Pension Rights - same as UK.

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Power to you B.M. I had a personal pension scheme (portable) for 20 years, and after that time I was seeing only 1.5 to 2.0 % annual increment in the value. I immediately withdrew the funds (no small amount by then) and have seen 7 to 8 % annual increments since then. I am no NOT an Independent Financial Advisor, so will not tell you how I achieved that return, but it was legal and simple. At 7% annually, then every 10 years your fund doubles in size - this means a huge difference at maturity.

I dont take risks with my pension, but neither do I get suckered into the schemes offered by most Financial Institutions. i took an early withdrawal 2 years ago of 200,000 euros and have bought a property for my retirement already - it is currently let out through an agent, fully insured and bonded, and have 1000 euros net, a month going back into my funds.

From talking to my USA Friends this is not so different to what they do - if they are self - employed. If you are employed by another company (rather than as a contractor) then they seem to get the worst additional Pension Rights - same as UK.

My pension is with the Kingfisher group, we used to be able to draw it out when we wanted, but now it is all changed, you cannot touch it until you reach the age of pension..

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The US still has a few different retirement formats. I personally have a defined benefit pension plan which is structured somewhat like social security in that it pays me X dollars a month per year that I worked. I also have a 401k which has pre-tax contributions. The 401k's value will be whatever I put in plus interest, minus taxes when I retire. If I withdraw money early I pay a penalty. Both of these are through my company and the Union I belong to. My wife owns her own company but she in the sole employee, so she hasn't set up any retirement plans for herself yet. We are going to set up a Roth IRA for the both of us. The Roth is similar to the 401k except you put in after tax dollars and don't have to pay taxes later when you retire. The downside is, you are only allowed to put in a small amount of money each year into the Roth. As side investments, we also have a stock portfolio and own some real estate.

We are not typical though, many people only have whatever their company offers. (If they offer anything at all) Many of the people I have spoken to say that Social Security is their retirement plan!

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We are going to set up a Roth IRA for the both of us.

If you were to post that one single line right there, on an Irish forum, you would stomp a lot of people and most likely see -> You're going to set up what now? :blink::wacko: Those three letters mean something completely different over here lol

Edited by Beckys_Mom
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IRA= Individual Retirement Account. Sorry for the use of he acronym.

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IRA= Individual Retirement Account. Sorry for the use of he acronym.

I thought it had something to do with pensions ( Retirement funding ) I was just sharing how the letters alone would look on our side of the fence lol :P

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