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Still Waters

Why Is a Baker's Dozen 13?

15 posts in this topic

The next time you get the gift of an extra doughnut added to your dozen, thank crooked 13th-century bakers for the bonus treat. In the 1260s, British breadmakers were notorious for shorting customers with skimpy loaves.

http://www.mentalflo...bakers-dozen-13

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England has a long history of regulation of trade, and bakers were regulated by a trade guild called The Worshipful Company of Bakers, which dates back to at least the reign of Henry II (1154-89). The law that caused bakers to be so wary was the Assize of Bread and Ale (Assisa panis et cervisiaeIn) 1266 - and in force until the late 19th.Cent. Henry III revived an ancient statute that regulated the price of bread according to the price of wheat. Bakers or brewers who gave short measure could be fined, pilloried or flogged, as in 1477 when the Chronicle of London reported that a baker called John Mundew was 'schryved (forced to admit his guilt) upon the pyllory' for selling bread that was underweight.

The bit of the Act that I like is.......

brewers in cities could afford to sell two gallons of ale for a penny, and out of cities three gallons for a penny; and when in a town three gallons are sold for a penny, out of a town they may and ought to sell four.

And they tell me life's got better! Bah!!!

(My files)

Edited by ealdwita
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Great to know! For trivia, of course.

I had always thought(don't ask how, I don't know) that the 13th was a old-school courtesy extra for buying twelve as opposed to just one or 6.

So much for my thoughts!

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Great to know! For trivia, of course.

I had always thought(don't ask how, I don't know) that the 13th was a old-school courtesy extra for buying twelve as opposed to just one or 6.

So much for my thoughts!

I thought the same! Looking for the best in people I guess... nice little tidbit to know though -
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ya.. i always thought it was a gesture of generosity . Maybe bakers are trying to make up for their stingy fore bakers?

I've wondered too if it might have been based on a twelve disciples and the head bun type thing ..

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Im with all you guys ^^

I thought they were being generous , turns out they are just paying us back for ripping off our ancestors :tu:

TiP.

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OK, now I'm mad.

Wait 'till those bakers find-out my 12 ounce T-Bone is now only 10. <_<

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OK, now I'm mad.

Wait 'till those bakers find-out my 12 ounce T-Bone is now only 10. <_<

Off the subject but some what related , I saw that Subway got into trouble the other day because the old foot long was not quite a foot long.... !

Back on subject !

TiP.

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Off the subject but some what related , I saw that Subway got into trouble the other day because the old foot long was not quite a foot long.... !

Back on subject !

TiP.

Yeah, heard that also!

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Hmm I always thought it was for taste test to see if its worth buying.

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The Worshipful Company of Bakers,

Best organisation name, ever. I'm sure it's because they were so Christian. ;)

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Best organisation name, ever. I'm sure it's because they were so Christian. ;)

You're nearly right, Kasey. The original Medieval Guilds (from the Anglo-Saxon word gilden=to pay) were closely were closely associated with religious activities, notably in support of chantry chapels and churches and the observance of ceremonies, notably the 'mystery plays'.

The accolade 'Worshipful' is granted to a guild after it has successfully applied for 'livery status'......This refers to the elegant robes that the guild members wear on ceremonial occasions.

There at present 108 Livery Companies (all 'worshipful') in the UK, ranging from the senior...The Worshipful Company of Mercers, to the youngest...The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals.

s10649.gif

Sorry.

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That's so cool. Thanks for the information Eald. I'm always glad to learn something new. Do they still wear the robes?

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That's so cool. Thanks for the information Eald. I'm always glad to learn something new. Do they still wear the robes?

Some of them do, Kasey. Usually on special occasions such as a Coronation or Lord Mayor's Show.

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Thanks for the information. :)

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