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Still Waters

Extinction of species 'greatly exaggerated'

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In the past scientists have warned that up to five per cent of species are at risk of dying-out as a result of climate change, deforestation and development.

But a new analysis by the University of New Zealand found that this figure was five times greater than reality because the number of animals living in the wild in the first place had been over estimated.

http://www.telegraph...xaggerated.html

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I would have to actually see the study, which there is no link to in the article. What animals were studied, did it include microbes or something.

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In the past scientists have warned that up to five per cent of species are at risk of dying-out as a result of climate change, deforestation and development.

But a new analysis by the University of New Zealand found that this figure was five times greater than reality because the number of animals living in the wild in the first place had been over estimated.

http://www.telegraph...xaggerated.html

Umm, the University of New Zealand has not existed since 1961.... Te Wānanga o Aotearoa (founded in 1984- still going strong) literally means The University of New Zealand, but is never refered to as such. This is because its student base is predominately Maori. The professor quoted in the article is from the University of Auckland. I need more facts before i can have an opinion.

Edited by Professor Buzzkill

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I believe our oceans are at the greatest risk. For losing species do to overfishing but that is only part of the puzzle.

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Right, so this could be good news, but at the same time, hmmm... I worry that articles like this, which as pointed out already don't give links to the actual study, could give people an excuse to write it all off as nonsense and stop giving a hoot about conservation!

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