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robloc93

La Llorona

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I recently went to Jalisco, Mexico to visit my fathers birthplace and had an unusual experience while I was at my aunts ranch. I was sleeping (January 20 to be precise) and was awoken to a strange sound;like chains dragging and weird moans, keeping me awake all night and it reminded me of an old tale of the one known as "La Llorona", the crying woman. As a child, I always overheard tales and legends about a woman that drowned her children and went insane in search of them. I awoke to a weird sound that made me investigate the area. I saw nothing but it gave me the chills thinking that this might been the famous "crying woman". I have always been fascinated by this urban legend and am just asking if there is any more information to this tale as my relatives always told it to me as if they were scared to death. I have done some research but no credible facts or evidence have been presented to me. I'm just curious if anyone else has been as amused as I am by this.

I've always been told it's a "Grimm Reaper" type of presence but I can't understand why a woman who killed her children would be dragging around chains. Any further info would be greatly appreciated.This video gave me the chills when I stumbled upon it years ago but I am pretty skeptical now and even if its real,I figure it can easily be staged. Thank you all for your time.

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Its just a legend, it's heard in Colombia and Venezuela, a scary one but just a legened

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Its just a legend, it's heard in Colombia and Venezuela, a scary one but just a legened

Yeah, I figured....but I thought I'd ask just in case there was any more info on how the legend originated. Thank you for your reply.

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Yeah, I figured....but I thought I'd ask just in case there was any more info on how the legend originated. Thank you for your reply.

Though i know few people who have seen a women like that, remote in the countryside when it was raining

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My favorite variation on the story is the one where she hides her face as she cries for her murdered children by the riverside. When a man (it's always a guy in the story) approaches her and asks if she needs assistance, she will suddenly turn around and reveal her face to be that of a human skull. Naturally, the guy drops dead from fright.

What amuses me is the fact that if anyone sees her true form and dies on the spot, then how does anyone know what her face really (supposedly) looks like?

Good ole' urban legends. :tu:

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My favorite variation on the story is the one where she hides her face as she cries for her murdered children by the riverside. When a man (it's always a guy in the story) approaches her and asks if she needs assistance, she will suddenly turn around and reveal her face to be that of a human skull. Naturally, the guy drops dead from fright.

What amuses me is the fact that if anyone sees her true form and dies on the spot, then how does anyone know what her face really (supposedly) looks like?

Good ole' urban legends. :tu:

I've never heard that version before. That's a new one on me!

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My favorite variation on the story is the one where she hides her face as she cries for her murdered children by the riverside. When a man (it's always a guy in the story) approaches her and asks if she needs assistance, she will suddenly turn around and reveal her face to be that of a human skull. Naturally, the guy drops dead from fright.

What amuses me is the fact that if anyone sees her true form and dies on the spot, then how does anyone know what her face really (supposedly) looks like?

Good ole' urban legends. :tu:

Yeah, I've heard this version and it still intrigues me. My family (very old fashioned, lol) tried to scare me as a child so I'd come home early, lol.

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I guess that's one way to get your kids home on time.

I've never heard of this before thanks for sharing.

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I recently went to Jalisco, Mexico to visit my fathers birthplace and had an unusual experience while I was at my aunts ranch. I was sleeping (January 20 to be precise) and was awoken to a strange sound;like chains dragging and weird moans, keeping me awake all night and it reminded me of an old tale of the one known as "La Llorona", the crying woman. As a child, I always overheard tales and legends about a woman that drowned her children and went insane in search of them. I awoke to a weird sound that made me investigate the area. I saw nothing but it gave me the chills thinking that this might been the famous "crying woman". I have always been fascinated by this urban legend and am just asking if there is any more information to this tale as my relatives always told it to me as if they were scared to death. I have done some research but no credible facts or evidence have been presented to me. I'm just curious if anyone else has been as amused as I am by this.

I've always been told it's a "Grimm Reaper" type of presence but I can't understand why a woman who killed her children would be dragging around chains. Any further info would be greatly appreciated.This video gave me the chills when I stumbled upon it years ago but I am pretty skeptical now and even if its real,I figure it can easily be staged. Thank you all for your time.

The same sound of chains dragging is also attributed to the UK Black Dog which would walk along the tall walls of Bodmin Jail in Dartmoor before a hanging. I imagine it's the creature purposely dragging it's long four rear claws along the stone. He's a typical story http://www.bbc.co.uk...lack_dog.shtml]The Black Dog of Bouley Bay[/url]

Hey! I just found this too

The "]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadejo]cadejo (Spanish pronunciation: [kaˈðexo][/url]

The cadejo (Spanish pronunciation: [kaˈðexo]) is a character from Salvadoran, Belizean, Nicaraguan, Costa Rican, Honduran, Guatemalan and southern Mexican folklore. There is a good white cadejo and an evil black cadejo. Both are spirits that appear at night to travelers: the white to protect them from harm during their journey, the black (sometimes an incarnation of the devil), to kill them. The colors of the Cadejo are sometimes exchanged according to local tradition. In some places the black cadejo is seen as the good one and the white cadejo the evil one. They usually appear in the form of a large (up to the size of a cow), shaggy dog with burning red eyes and a goat's hooves, although in some areas they have more bull-like characteristics. According to the stories, many have tried to kill the black cadejo but have failed and perished. Also it is said that if a cadejo is killed, it will smell terrible for several days, and then its body will disappear. Some Guatemalan folklore also tells of a cadejo that guards drunks against anyone who tries to rob or hurt them. When the cadejo is near, it is said to bring about a strong goat-like smell. Most people say never to turn your back to the creature because otherwise you will go crazy.

In popular etymology, the name cadejo is thought to have derived from the Spanish word "cadena", meaning "chain"; the cadejo is at times represented as dragging a chain behind him. There is a fairly large member of the weasel family, the tayra, which in common speech is called a cadejo and is cited as a possible source of the legend.

Edited by Rewlahool

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I never heard of La Llorona to drag chains.

The legend actually began in D.F. right before La Conquista. The Aztecs claimed to hear a woman crying. To them it was just an omen that things were going to change. Another omen was a two-headed comet although PBS does not mention this about the comet but about people instead! That is new to me.

http://www.pbs.org/o...1/pop-omens.htm

The legend then turned into a cautionary tale warning females to choose their mates carefully, avoiding drunks since the husband in most versions loves to spend all the money on women and cheap booze, and to endure in motherhood no matter what for failing to this degree means not being allowed into heaven. This is the version I know, she is not allowed and was told to go find her children, so she has to spend eternity crying and looking for her children.

Edited by I believe you

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uhhhh its not even an animal...

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uhhhh its not even an animal...

And.....?

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And.....?

exactly

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