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Australian Gun Ban Video

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I've noticed that all the Australians here who have discussed the gun problems in the US seem uniformly to be FOR gun control. I assumed it was typical of all Ozzies. Guess I was a wee bit mistaken!

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Every country will have those who are pro and anti gun. This report is distinctly one sided, the real telling point was when one guy said to "make sure you are a member of the NRA", right.

Please take note of the following the report "Firearms and Violent Crime 1995 to 2005":

The current analysis shows that the use of firearms in robbery offences peaked in

1997 and has since been steadily falling. Shooting offences have also declined in recent years after a peak

in 2001. The rate of shooting incidents per 100,000 population is higher in Sydney than in the rest of NSW,

with Fairfield-Liverpool Statistical Subdivision recording particularly high rates. The age profile of alleged

offenders involved in firearms incidents has changed since 2000, with markedly fewer offenders aged 15-19

identified in connection with firearm-related incidents in 2005.

INTRODUCTION

In the first half of 2006 there were a

number of shooting incidents in NSW

which were widely reported in the press.

In many of these cases, shots were fired

into cars or houses, resulting in property

damage, injury and, on occasion, death.

For instance, in one tragic incident,

which was apparently domestic violence

related, a bullet fired from a passing car

killed a woman standing near a window

of her home (Sydney Morning Herald,

27 March 2006). The extensive attention

that these types of offences receive in

the media can give the impression that

crimes involving firearms are frequent

occurrences or are on the rise. The

purpose of this paper is to provide

statistical evidence bearing on the

extent to which firearms are used in the

commission of offences and the extent to

which the incidence of firearm offences

have varied over the last 11 years.

This paper

Also take note of the number of gun crimes steadily decreasing on the graph at the top of page 3 of the report:

http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/bocsar/ll_bocsar.nsf/vwFiles/CJB98.pdf/$file/CJB98.pdf

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Gun crimes in Australia, which are rare, are usually between criminals. Home invasions are still fairly rare.

And like libstaK said, the video is very one sided.

Historically, Australia has had relatively low levels of violent crime. Overall levels of homicide and suicide have been in decline for several decades, while the proportion of these crimes that involved firearms has consistently declined since the early 1980s. Between 1991 and 2001, the number of firearm-related deaths in Australia declined 47%.[25] According to a 2011 report from the Australian government, "...the number of victims of homicide has been in decline since 1996. In 1996, there were 354 victims and 260 victims in 2010. This is a decrease of 27 percent." And furthermore, "The proportion of homicide victims killed by offenders using firearms in 2009–10 represented a decrease of 18 percentage points from the peak of 31 percent in 1995–96 (the year in which the Port Arthur massacre occurred with the death of 35 people, which subsequently led to the introduction of stringent firearms legislation)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Australia#Measuring_the_effects_of_firearms_laws_in_Australia

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Ultimately it was the choice of Australians to give away this freedom and so I have no issue - it was done democratically. I merely was pointing to the fact that I was a bit surprised that some there were so vocal about the loss of this freedom. Naivete on my part I guess.

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I've noticed that all the Australians here who have discussed the gun problems in the US seem uniformly to be FOR gun control. I assumed it was typical of all Ozzies. Guess I was a wee bit mistaken!

No, they are right. Most of these video's don't reflect national opinions.

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Individuals' opinions are never their nation's opinion when that nation doesn't respect its individuals' opinions. And that's a shame for such nations.

I'm sure Arthur Field is understandably very one-sided after he lived through the helpless terror of being jumped on, choked, tied up, and robbed. Those objective opinions on the other side of the arms control issue don't care about Arthur Field's opinion because they haven't been jumped on, choked, tied up and robbed.

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Individuals' opinions are never their nation's opinion when that nation doesn't respect its individuals' opinions. And that's a shame for such nations.

I'm sure Arthur Field is understandably very one-sided after he lived through the helpless terror of being jumped on, choked, tied up, and robbed. Those objective opinions on the other side of the arms control issue don't care about Arthur Field's opinion because they haven't been jumped on, choked, tied up and robbed.

Quit making sense.
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Pro gun people being, well, pro gun. Not a lot of sense being made, just a lot of **** being thrown everywhere.

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Ultimately it was the choice of Australians to give away this freedom and so I have no issue - it was done democratically. I merely was pointing to the fact that I was a bit surprised that some there were so vocal about the loss of this freedom. Naivete on my part I guess.

Can you please explain what freedom I have given up ?

TiP.

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The freedom to shoot people obviously.

Can you please explain what freedom I have given up ?

TiP.

The right to shoot people. Duh. You're not really free if you can't shoot people or walk around with massively overpowered assault rifles.

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The freedom to shoot people obviously.

The right to shoot people. Duh. You're not really free if you can't shoot people or walk around with massively overpowered assault rifles.

Your definition of freedom is messed up bro.

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Your definition of freedom is messed up bro.

I think you missed the joke :-*

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Thing is, unless you're a convicted criminal or under psychiatric care you can buy a fire arm.

There are some styles of guns you can't buy, but I could apply for and get a gun within a few months - except the law also says things about securing the guns, mandatory training etc etc.

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Your definition of freedom is messed up bro.

Point missed massively.

Of course, my definitions of freedom are different to yours because I actually know what freedom is.

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Can you please explain what freedom I have given up ?

TiP.

It wasn't intended as a remonstrance, just an observation. At one point an Australian citizen had a right to own firearms and now they no longer have such a right, is this not correct? Can you, if you were so minded today, go and purchase a firearm?

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It wasn't intended as a remonstrance, just an observation. At one point an Australian citizen had a right to own firearms and now they no longer have such a right, is this not correct? Can you, if you were so minded today, go and purchase a firearm?

That's a good point about the freedom, two different ways to look at it.

But today, like Wearer of Hats said, it's not impossible to purchase a gun, just not easy. It would involve a lot of paperwork, a lot of verification by many groups, constant checkups and possibly even training would have to take place. Plus all the secure lockups you would need to be installed in your home.

They didn't totally ban guns, just made ownership extremely stricter. And since then, crime rates have dropped dramatically, not just gun crimes.

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It wasn't intended as a remonstrance, just an observation. At one point an Australian citizen had a right to own firearms and now they no longer have such a right, is this not correct? Can you, if you were so minded today, go and purchase a firearm?

I could. That of course, granted that it was an air rifle.

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It wasn't intended as a remonstrance, just an observation. At one point an Australian citizen had a right to own firearms and now they no longer have such a right, is this not correct? Can you, if you were so minded today, go and purchase a firearm?

Could you? Or would you have to go through background checks and so forth?

We have background checks etc. We restrict the type of guns allowed to be brought. But as I said, if I wanted to, I could. I even know where I'd go to get a weapon.

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It wasn't intended as a remonstrance, just an observation. At one point an Australian citizen had a right to own firearms and now they no longer have such a right, is this not correct? Can you, if you were so minded today, go and purchase a firearm?

Of course we can have firearms , I have 3 of them in my gun safe at home :gun:

The only thing we can't do is own semi-automatic , pump action weapons or pistols ( pistols you can have if you have a special licence , security guard , target shooting etc) .

We can't just go into the gun shop and walk out with a gun in the same day , you need to first have a shooters licence and then apply for a permit for the specific gun you want to buy . It's been a while but from memory the permit takes a few weeks to a month to come back , a pain in the ass but thats the law !

Hope this clears it up

TiP.

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For the record I have no problem with gun owners being required to take a safety course as long as it isn't prohibitively expensive. Nor do I have a problem with making hi capacity magazines no longer legally available - or so expensive that they are almost impossible to come by. If a citizen is in a firefight and ten rounds at a time isn't enough then they probably are done anyway. Some compromise is necessary. But banning a weapon that is responsible for the tiniest fraction of killings while leaving the major offenders (handguns) untouched is outrageous and is purely a sop to the crowd that is scared of their own shadow about the handling and use of something that is essentially a tool.

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For the record I have no problem with gun owners being required to take a safety course as long as it isn't prohibitively expensive. Nor do I have a problem with making hi capacity magazines no longer legally available - or so expensive that they are almost impossible to come by. If a citizen is in a firefight and ten rounds at a time isn't enough then they probably are done anyway. Some compromise is necessary. But banning a weapon that is responsible for the tiniest fraction of killings while leaving the major offenders (handguns) untouched is outrageous and is purely a sop to the crowd that is scared of their own shadow about the handling and use of something that is essentially a tool.

It's a band-aid solution that's worked incredibly well....

The people agitating for gun control got something.

The PM at the time looked like he was doing something about crime.

The criminals made a few bucks on gun buy-backs.

People who didn't own a gun didn't have to worry about it.

The Police looked pro-active about policing for once.

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An air rifle isnn't a firearm lol There's no fire. Just a lot of air.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_gun

Just as lethal as an ordinary firearm.

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At the time of when this all happend I had a semi auto and a pump action.. ok i was a bit miffed that I was loosing my hunting guns.. but in all reality.. that was just me being lazy :) .. I just had to end up digging out the old bolt action and the under and over ..

dont have my guns anymore.. got to the point where it was dead money.. lost interest in shooting so sold them to my nephew..

Have had a few run ins with NRA supporters on a couple of forums re the aussie attitude towards guns.. and the misconceptions that gun related crime is on the rise.. which it isnt :D and most aussies really dont give a rats about owning guns..

if someone breaks into your house with a gun.. and you have one.. its not going to make a difference on how powerful it is.. how many bullets it will fire.. it will come down to who pulls the trigger first.. personally.. the advocates I know for the return of the semi auto's and like the NRA really are not that good of shooter :) if you cant hit it the first time.. then you may as well give up shooting.. because your still going to waste more bullets each time you try to hit what your shooting at afterwards..

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