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Giant Crows

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I have read somewhere many years ago about giant crows that where meant to be about 2 feet or something like that.

What do people think about them?

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I posted about them.

I found them on a website about cryptids, and it was the only website that mentioned them. Well, it actually talked about giant ravens, somwehere in British Columbia.

These ravens lived hidden away in some valley, and were near flightless and large as eagles. They are also said to have some red in their tail feathers.

Let me see if I can find that thread.

+++

EDIT:

Here it is:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=225232

.

Edited by Abramelin
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The ones they're talking about are cryptids, they're just large and have grown so large they stay on the ground mostly because it's too hard for them to fly unless they have to to escape or evade predators. Although, I have seen some that seemed really big.

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The ones they're talking about are cryptids, they're just large and have grown so large they stay on the ground mostly because it's too hard for them to fly unless they have to to escape or evade predators. Although, I have seen some that seemed really big.

Yes, the further north you go, the larger ravens become. It has to do with an adaptation to the cold, or so they say. The quotient of body volume and body surface area goes up.

But Keninsc, have you read about the source of this 'myth'? The site I started my thread with (see link in my former post) is all I could find.

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Yes, the further north you go, the larger ravens become. It has to do with an adaptation to the cold, or so they say. The quotient of body volume and body surface area goes up.

But Keninsc, have you read about the source of this 'myth'? The site I started my thread with (see link in my former post) is all I could find.

My husband said the ravens that were everywhere and landed on his car a couple hundred miles north of Edmonton, AB, were easily two-feet tall.

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There are crows that big in Japan ,right now.

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My mom had giant crows in Virginia. Her job was refilling their watering-hole and if she slacked, they let her know, and could have easily carried her off.

Anyway, two states later, and I haven't seen ones so large since.

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There are crows that big in Japan ,right now.

You mean jungle crows. That are big alright, but not as big or as or bigger than golden eagles:

British Columbian giant raven (Interior of B.C. NA): A piece of local folklore, the bush mechanics who worked in the interior of B.C. claim that here is a valley, rich in timber, which is populated by enormous ravens bigger than golden eagles. They say these ravens are dangerous animals, very opportunistic, and will not hesitate to tear someones camp apart. they are nearly flightless, and have much red in their tail plumage. These are obviously a specialized species of raven which developed in the isolation of this valley. However, if any introduced predators like dogs or cats make it there these ravens might become threatened.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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You mean jungle crows. That are big alright, but not as big or as or bigger than golden eagles:

British Columbian giant raven (Interior of B.C. NA): A piece of local folklore, the bush mechanics who worked in the interior of B.C. claim that here is a valley, rich in timber, which is populated by enormous ravens bigger than golden eagles. They say these ravens are dangerous animals, very opportunistic, and will not hesitate to tear someones camp apart. they are nearly flightless, and have much red in their tail plumage. These are obviously a specialized species of raven which developed in the isolation of this valley. However, if any introduced predators like dogs or cats make it there these ravens might become threatened.

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Theres this statue right outside....I think the east gate of ikebukero station in Tokyo ,and they congregate there . They are literally terrifying .

Its a hitchcock movie come alive .

I once had one rip food out of my hand ,while walking in Kichijoji park .

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My husband said the ravens that were everywhere and landed on his car a couple hundred miles north of Edmonton, AB, were easily two-feet tall.

Heck, i've seen some around vancouver that are nearly two feet tall. Would make an awesome pet :whistle::innocent:

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What kind of crows are you guys seeing that are smaller than two feet?

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normal i think

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What kind of crows are you guys seeing that are smaller than two feet?

They vary. The crows my mom "watered" made you stop and look twice. They were far larger than the average ones around us in WV.

And I've yet to see a large crow in southern Texas. Lots of bigger grackles, than I'm used to though.

The ravens my husband saw were the largest birds he's seen, as in larger in bulk, heavier.

Edited by QuiteContrary

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oh right. Cool. I think they exist but are just mutants really.

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I don't know people, but I am getting the feeling some here confuse normal ravens for large crows.

About the "two feet" size

The smallest corvid is the Dwarf Jay (Aphelocoma nana), at 41 g (1.4 oz) and 21.5 cm (8.5 inches). The largest corvids are the Common Raven (Corvus corax) and the Thick-billed Raven (Corvus crassirostris), both of which regularly exceed 1400 grams (3 lbs) and 65 cm (26 inches).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvidae

The Golden Eagle is a large, dark brown raptor with broad wings. Its size is variable: it ranges from 66 to 102 cm (26 to 40 in) in length and it has a typical wingspan of 1.8 to 2.34 m (5.9 to 7.7 ft). In the largest race (A. c. daphanea) males and females weigh 4.05 kg (8.9 lb) and 6.35 kg (14.0 lb).

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Golden_Eagle

So a regular sized common raven is as large as the smallest of Golden Eagles (Japanese Golden Eagles).

But this is what I quoted: "enormous ravens bigger than golden eagles", and obvioulsy the Golden Eagle they compared it with is the North American one.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I don't know people, but I am getting the feeling some here confuse normal ravens for large crows.

About the "two feet" size

The smallest corvid is the Dwarf Jay (Aphelocoma nana), at 41 g (1.4 oz) and 21.5 cm (8.5 inches). The largest corvids are the Common Raven (Corvus corax) and the Thick-billed Raven (Corvus crassirostris), both of which regularly exceed 1400 grams (3 lbs) and 65 cm (26 inches).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvidae

The Golden Eagle is a large, dark brown raptor with broad wings. Its size is variable: it ranges from 66 to 102 cm (26 to 40 in) in length and it has a typical wingspan of 1.8 to 2.34 m (5.9 to 7.7 ft). In the largest race (A. c. daphanea) males and females weigh 4.05 kg (8.9 lb) and 6.35 kg (14.0 lb).

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Golden_Eagle

So a regular sized common raven is as large as the smallest of Golden Eagles (Japanese Golden Eagles).

But this is what I quoted: "enormous ravens bigger than golden eagles", and obvioulsy the Golden Eagle they compared it with is the North American one.

.

My mom's huge crows were suburban social creatures that visited regularly in a group (murder) to her birdbath to drink. I thought ravens were more carrion eating, wilderness areas and less social. And they "cawed", even if they may look terribly similar to the untrained eye, do they sound the same? I know crow sounds.

I've seen my husbands pictures of ravens, they don't look that similar to me to crows. Heavier bodied, not so sleek. I don't see confusing the two.

But can I be 100% certain, no, probably not.

Edited by QuiteContrary

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My mom's huge crows were suburban social creatures that visited in groups (murder). I thought ravens were more carrion eating, wilderness areas and less social. And they "cawed", even if they may look terribly similar to the untrained eye, do they sound the same? I know crow sounds.

Ravens are VERY social, but won't show up in large groups in urbanized areas. They prefer to stay away from cities and large groups of humans, as far as I know.

But when you say they 'cawed', then yes, it must have been crows. Ravens don't caw, but they do make lots of weird sounds. In general, they 'quork'..

Now I am getting really curious. Can you (or anyone) show a photo of these crows?

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Ravens are VERY social, but won't show up in large groups in urbanized areas. They prefer to stay away from cities and large groups of humans, as far as I know.

But when you say they 'cawed', then yes, it must have been crows. Ravens don't caw, but they do make lots of weird sounds. In general, they 'quork'..

Now I am getting really curious. Can you (or anyone) show a photo of these crows?

I talked to my mom last night. I though for sure she had taken photos of these birds. She claims she doesn't think she did, but I told her to look anyway. She's good at keeping photo albums up-to-date. This was 1980-1990.

I'll remind her again next time we talk.

I did check and where she lived borders raven range, but these were crows, I've really no doubt. I like crows and watch them whenever I can. Their sounds, behavior, body type, even beaks, I never thought anything else.

I've never seen any so large in my life.

Edited by QuiteContrary

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I talked to my mom last night. I though for sure she had taken photos of these birds. She claims she doesn't think she did, but I told her to look anyway. She's good at keeping photo albums up-to-date. This was 1980-1990.

I'll remind her again next time we talk.

I did check and where she lived borders raven range, but these were crows, I've really no doubt. I like crows and watch them whenever I can. Their sounds, behavior, body type, even beaks, I never thought anything else.

I've never seen any so large in my life.

But were we fooled somehow, idk?

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bigcrow010.jpg
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bigcrow010.jpg

Are you saying this isn't normal?

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I talked to my mom last night. I though for sure she had taken photos of these birds. She claims she doesn't think she did, but I told her to look anyway. She's good at keeping photo albums up-to-date. This was 1980-1990.

I'll remind her again next time we talk.

I did check and where she lived borders raven range, but these were crows, I've really no doubt. I like crows and watch them whenever I can. Their sounds, behavior, body type, even beaks, I never thought anything else.

I've never seen any so large in my life.

Another 'possibility': they are raven-crow hybrids.

I don't even know if it is possible at all, and I have only heard stories about there being raven-crow hybrids, but never seen one.

+++

EDIT:

This is supposed to be one:

[media=]

[/media]

And another one:

But does hybridization also happen in the wild?

,

Edited by Abramelin

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Ravens generally come in pairs (mate for life, IIRC) and sound like ancient winos dying of something with nasty pulmonary complications. Crows come in flocks of up to several hundred and 'caw'; a flock of crows will pound the snot out of any raven it can isolate. A 'murder' of crows is the formal name for a flock, and well deserved.

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